Souffle questions...

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by offtopic, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. offtopic

    offtopic

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    At home cook
    Hello everyone, for my cooking class, I need to make a poster by tomorow about the chemical reaction that takes place when baking a souffle and why it collapses (chemically). It's already 8:20, any and ALL help would be greatly appreciated....BTW I've been trying google for about an hour and a half, this is my last place to turn.
     
  2. anneke

    anneke

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  3. offtopic

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    Thanks so much, I was searching for different versions of: ("chemical reaction" souffle collapse) in google and came out with crap...from taht website, I can use "
    Molecular gastronomists believe that cooking would improve if cooks understood more about the processes involved, abandoned the misconceptions of the past and embraced improvements based on rational models. How many amateurs have watched dejectedly as yet another soufflé has failed to rise? The key, according to This, is to heat the soufflé from the bottom because evaporating water pushes the other parts of the soufflé upward, and to whip the egg whites as much as possible to achieve maximum firmness.
    A soufflé is based on a viscous preparation, for example a Bechamel sauce made of butter, flour and milk, to which is added cheese, egg yolks and whisked egg whites. It used to be thought that soufflés rose as the air bubbles in the egg whites grew bigger as they got warmer. However, This has measured the temperature and pressure inside a soufflé and calculated that the bubbles can swell by 20 per cent at the most whereas soufflés can double in volume.
    In fact, the soufflé rises as water from the milk and yolks evaporates, and rises to the top of the soufflé, pushing the layers of mixture upwards. This means that heating the container from the bottom produces the best results. He has also found that the stiffer the egg whites, the more the soufflé rises. The firmer egg whites have a greater volume to begin with, but the firmness of the foam also prevents the bubbles from passing quickly through the soufflé and escaping; slowly rising bubbles are better at pushing up the layers of mixture."

    Thanks so much..anyone else got any other sites?
     
  4. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Try Googling "Harold McGee + souffle" and see what you get. He's the food science guru, with Alton Brown being his most noticeable acolyte.