Some Wine History

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cape chef, Mar 9, 2002.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I wanted to start this thread as to not get to far of topic with "symposium"

    Their is incredible debate over where the first wine fermented.
    I hope we can discuss, and learm from eachother about this nector I love so.

    as Devotay, said in the symposium thread about Huge Johnson, I would also like to start this thread with a quote from Mr Johnson

    " To live in the golden age of one of life's great pleasures is something we must all do, but few of us seem to realize. There never has been a time when more good wine, and more different kinds of wine, were being made. It was 150years ago that Cyrus Redding, a London wine merchant, wrote his

    History and decsription of modern wine.

    To him the word "modern" distinquished the wines of his times from those of the ancients, still then reverentially supposed to have been, like their architecture, of a quality of that could be only humbly imitated.

    Redding asserted the new world of nineteenth-century wine, based on the technology of the industrial revolution. If the great mass of wine in his day was still made by medieval methods, the leaders were setting the styles and standards and devising the techniques that today we accept as classic.


    These methods are now old. Our understanding of wine and our techniques for making it have moved into a new phase, led by sciences that were not dreamed of in the last century. It is time to use the word modern again with a new meaning to describe the brilliant new age of wine that opened in the past generation"

    Writen by Huge Johnson 1983 from (Hugh Johnsons Modern Encyclopedia of Wine)

    So, any one want to try tracing some wine?
     
  2. athenaeus

    athenaeus

    Messages:
    1,389
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Cape chef could you please define the subject a bit.

    Are we interested in who fermented wine first on generally on history of wine?
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Athenaeus,

    I was hoping to get deeper into the history of wine.
    With that research the fermentation question will answer it's self.

    Thank you in advance for any help.
    cc
     
  4. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    935
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Allow me to pose the first specific question in regards to this topic. Which beverage do you believe was first invented? Wine? Beer? or Mead (honey wine)?
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Pete,

    Thoughtful question,

    Let me explain what I was hoping for in regards to this thread.

    Although, I love a good “pop quiz”, just look at the ones I have posted in this forum,
    What I was truly after was a sharing of imformation, a little “history networking”about wine.

    The reason I see it this way is because; I would love to have any members of cheftalk, regardless
    Of wine knowelage, feel comfortable to read and perhaps post to this thread.

    As always, thanks for your input
    cc
    :chef:
     
  6. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    935
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Cape chef, I was not posing this as a pop quiz kind of question. I really am interested in the very origins of these three products. There as been numerous debates about which beverage was the first one produced as a matter of intent rather than just a matter of allowing nature to run its course. I was hoping that someone had an insight into this debate.

    The other reason I posed the question is to get people thinking about the history of some of our most ancient products. Many cultures considered the production of alcoholic beverages (ie beer, wine, & mead) as important, if not more important than the production of bread. I am also amazed that every single, ancient society, no matter how far spread, learned to harnass fermentation.

    As for wines beginnings that is about the extent of my knowledge, at this point. I have a much better understanding of the history of beer. My knowledge of wine doesn't pick up again until Roman times.