So,What up?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cape chef, Jan 13, 2001.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

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    I remember when I first got involved with Wine I had so many Questions, Some times I was embarrassed to ask because I didn't want to seem ignorant,Big mistake, I found a lot of people willing to help me get my feet,I mean my lips wet.Does anyone have any questions that they might not otherwise ask?
    I don't claim to be a you no "master" of wine, but I may be able to help. I also have learned that there are some folks who visit cheftalk that also have a great deal of wine knowledge.
    cc
     
  2. david jones

    david jones

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    Wine is for everyone. No language of discourse should exclude those who have no knowledge.
     
  3. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Thank you both for making this thread less intimidating than it could be if run by snobs.

    I know of a wine instructor who suggests that you should point to a price range on the wine list adn let the sommeilar (sp) pick a wine in that range.....thoughts?
     
  4. david jones

    david jones

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    Interesting approach.... In the last couple of wine lists that I did for restaurants, I added less mark-up on the wines that I felt complimented the cuisine. The obligatory cabernet and chardonnay placements were priced to make the restaurant money. But the diner who was willing to try Gruner Veltliner or a Tuscan Pinot Noir were going to get a great wine and a great deal.

    When I teach a green staff about describing wine, I compare it to describing how blue the sky is.... The description is relative to the life experiences of the parties involved. A sincere description of a wine based on your own experience, to me, is more worthwhile than an excersize in using the wine wheel. Wine is one of those subjects where there is always someone who knows more than you - as a server, you can never tell who that may be! And a server who admits to his/her guests that they are "just learning about wine" has gained a powerful, long-term sales tool.

    (If it's not obvious, I could pontificate for hours on this subject.)
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Pontificate all you like!

    Very positive concept you just described.
    And as a chef I like the approach you use on your mark up structure to menu friendly wines.
    I am sure that the Chefs in these restaurants we're happy to see that. The fact that so many wonderful exist today for the consumer to enjoy...is just another reason for the FOH staff to be well trained.
    If your customer is pleased with your choice then that bods well for your bottom line (tip)There are some people that probably always drink cab and chard because they think it is the only thing worth while,oh well there lose. I have a magnet on my fridge that says "life's to short to drink bad wine" I agree 100 percent but good doesn't need to be expensive. By the way David,Thanks for your informative post
    cc
     
  6. cape chef

    cape chef

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    MissyK, I want that tee shirt!!

    Great saying
    cc
     
  7. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Okay, this is a toughie...

    This coming weekend, we are cooking dinner for my mother's 60th birthday. She requested steamed lobster and prime rib. I asked her yesterday if she likes wine, because I never see her drink it. She replied that yes, she does like 1 in every 6 or so wines that she tries, but she doesn't like wines that are too dry. Also, she does not like red wine. Soooo... can you think of any white wine that's not too dry that will match well with this food??
     
  8. cape chef

    cape chef

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    momoreg,

    that is a challenging one!
    whites are great with the little "homard"
    But with the big beast Prime rib Ouch!!
    The estate series chardonnay from Columbia Crest is pretty tasty and highly available, the problem is the upfront acidity.But if you are looking to have a good time and not bet the bank on the wine a chard can work. Has Mom ever had wines from the Beaujolais region of burgundy? Village,Fleur etc are lovely reds that are made free flow style so they are not to heavy (maybe Fleur not free flow)But I know many people who are not red wine drinkers but have had some Beaujolais wines and have been pleasantly suprised
    cc
     
  9. momoreg

    momoreg

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    No, I'm quite sure my mother hasn't had any Beaujolais wines. I will check out those two wines. I agree with you, white wine and prime rib--yuck! I will definitely offer a bolder red wine to whomever wants it, but at least there's SOMETHING for her to enjoy, if she wants to drink wine with her dinner. And if all else fails, she can switch to water when the food comes out!!!

    In my experience, Chardonnay is on the drier side, but yes, it is light and easy to pair with many foods. I was wondering, I don't know much about Reisling from Alsace. I know it is less sweet than German Reisling, but is that always the case? And is that totally off the mark for this particular meal? I bought a nice bottle of it once, and all the guests finished it before I had a chance to taste it!! I guess it was good.
     
  10. isa

    isa

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    I don't like red wine either. Even if I ate prime rib I would drink white wine. I have one white wine that I really love. I'll have it with everything. It's Muscadet de Sevres et Maine. I can't describe it to you in wine terms because I'm not familiar with the vocabulary. Suffice to say it’s a very fresh wine that is not too sweet.
     
  11. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Yeah, I think that's more what she's familiar with. That and Manishewitz. Oh brother.

    How is the P.G.S.?
     
  12. cape chef

    cape chef

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    momoreg,
    about the Alsatian wines,there are generally dryer then those of Germany,If I recall there are only a few grapes that can be used In "varietal"wines.gewurtz,Riesling,Sylvader,Pino t gris,Pinot gris and pinot Noir Oh yeah and Muscat. dryer yes,higher in alcohol yes [​IMG]they also have a very ripe and scented aroma.sweeter wines from Alsace are vendage tardive,but they are vinified totally dry.Grains noble are produced similar to sauternes and have been affected by botrytis.But in general the wines of Alsace are dry,perfumed and yummy
    cc
     
  13. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Sisi, Thank you for that suggestion.. I was just reading about Muscadet, and there's another one that I've never tried. You don't need to use terminology. What does it taste like to you?
     
  14. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Hi Sisi,

    the best muscadets come from serve-et-Maine
    I believe in southeast Nantes in the Loire region.I have not had one in a while but i remember enjoying them
    cc
     
  15. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Thanks for all that info., CC...

    There's one thing I'm not understanding.. You said the sweeter Alsatian wines are vendage tardive , but they are vinified totally dry. Can you explain this to me in more simple terms, please?
     
  16. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I prefer red too. The fuller body the better. (I guess that goes with our New Year's resolution). Hmm...maybe I'll check out that PGS.
     
  17. isa

    isa

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    Momoreg,


    Sometimes white wine seems to have a sour after taste. Muscadet doesn't and yet it isn't too sweet or overly fruity. It's very fresh in the mouth with a little crispness.
     
  18. cape chef

    cape chef

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    momoreg,
    I'm sorry if that was a little confusing.
    Vendange tardive are made from grapes that are "late harvast" but through the vinification procces "making wine" the yeast eats the suger starts fermantation reduces the suger content put increases the intense flavor of the wine.
    Make sense?
    cc
     
  19. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Oh, gotcha. So all in all, would something like that fit the bill, or is it too dry?
     
  20. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Sisi, that one sounds like somewhat of a friendly wine for someone who doesn't drink much wine.