So... what are you growing this year?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by genemachine, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Since it is this time of the year, I gotta ask - what's up in the garden? My seedlings are coming along nicely. For tomatoes, I will grow San Marzano, Brandywine, Subarctic Plenty, Oxheart, Cherokee and Sweet Currant this year. Chilis, I got Serrano, Tabasco, Jalapeno, Habanero, Ancho, Bird's Eye and Scotch Bonnet. Show your works, folks!
     
  2. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I put in a brandywine plant last year, got nothing.  What a shame, a favorite of mine.  This year I'll probably do cour di bue ( oxheart ) sweet 100s, and maybe cherokee purple or green zebra.

    I just volunteered to assist with the setup for the annual Wasatch Community Garden's plant sale.  Still 6 weeks away, I usually get my plants there.

    I want to walk outside and grab a tomato off the vine right now!

    mjb.
     
  3. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Oh yeah, can't wait until they get ready - and this year I have a sheltered, south-facing garding which should have a seriously good microclimate for tomatoes. Thanks for reminding me of green zebra - got none this year, but they are great, too. But there is only so much space....
     
  4. thatchairlady

    thatchairlady

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    Have a perfect place for some tomatoes, pepper, cukes, string beans, etc... BUT local critters (groundhogs, especially) would just be lined up to mow everything down.

    Have a nice sized patch, right outside front door that I'm planning on converting into an herb garden.  Have a bay laurel (that I thought I killed last year, but made a come back) that I plan to put IN the ground.  In my area of NJ, odds are in its favor to survive winter, as long as not SEVERE and protected.  Want to put in a few rosemary plants and other stuff.  Want a few basil plants... or coking AND for the wonderful aroma that'll drift thru open windows... until it get too hot to do without AC.  Have sad, but till kicking, clumps of chives and oregano that managed to make it thru the winter indoors.  Also want some parsley, dill and cilantro.

    If I don't do anything with this patch of ground, it'll be a weedy mess by mid-summer.  Having a BIG (dangerous) maple tree taken down in next week or so.  Was thinking about the mounds of chipped branches that will result... maybe mulch??  Then did a little googling and found out that's NOT a great idea??  NOT good near house... home for insects and cause of somethiing called "artillery fungus"??
     
  5. genemachine

    genemachine

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    In my experience, mulching is good, but wood - and especially bark - mulches tend to acidify the soil a bit too much. I tend to mulch with straw. Perhaps don't chip the branches, but just leave the smaller ones intact and pile them up in a hidden corner? Hedgehogs and lizards love such piles and tend to eat insects and slugs which are after your vegetables.

    As for the herbs - just cleared a couple of meters of space which has been used for useless stuff by the previous tenant - gonna replace it with a wee little herb garden. Sage and rosemary and parsley and chives and thyme and laurel and basil are already sitting in pots ready to go out, oregano and savory have wintered well, gonna plant some lovage, chervil, borage, mint, dill, too :D
     
  6. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    TC Lady...I've heard the same about pine bark mulching.  People working where it's manufactured are required to wear masks and gloves, so there's got to be something in that.  Also, if you read the fine print on most bags of mulch (here at least) you may notice instructions not to touch it with the hands.  Perhaps this has got something to support what you say. 

    Personally,  I ignore that part :)  A large part of gardening is getting down and dirty (in a nice way!).  I'm still alive and kicking, so it could depend on individuals reactions to it, don't know.

    Summer just gone I had cherry tomatoes...so many!  Grazing in the garden is good fun.  I've got a big bush of sweet basil which is going absolutely nuts, and the smell of it fills the garden.  Then there's baby sage and marjoram, just seeded some curly leaf parsley.  It may be too late in the year, although there's some mild weather yet to come and it gets no way near as cold as northern climates.

    Just for sun I seeded some zuccinis.  Way to late for them, but they took, so we'll see what happens.  Also sprinkled some flower seeds about the beds to brighten it up during the quiet season.  I could plant winter veg but they take forever to yield.

    I'm just a relaxed chuck it in and see what happens gardener, no stress and sometimes I get something worthwhile :)
     
  7. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Here in the middle of the desert, it has proven difficult to grow very much.

    I met a gentleman recently who is also from Hawaii and we started to talk about just this.  The types of plants that we would typically have in our yards back home must be planted in pots and brought in during the Fall/Winter seasons.  I noticed that he had a pot of on his patio and commented on it.  A few days ago he brought he a cutting.  We use, green never red, Tī in cooking, so I am quite excited to give this a whirl… 
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
  8. wurzel

    wurzel

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    I've got a lot going on this year. In the perennial beds I should be seeing the first fruiting year on my plum, hazelnut and almond trees. My blackcurrant and redcurrant bushes are coming on nicely, whitecurrant is looking sickly as hell for some reason. Wolf berry and honey berry probably need another season to fruit but fingers crossed. Going to get some cranberries and blueberries in pots as well.

    As for perennial veg, jerusalem artichoke love my garden so I'll only put down half what I did last year, there's only so many we can use. Perennial kale has recovered from the slug mauling they received last year, hopefully they'll survive. Tree spinach, welsh onions, walking onions, wild garlic, skirret for root veg and walking stick cabbage because it looks awesome and tastes good enough.

    I've got attris and bendigo peppers along with tomasa and moneymaker tomatoes coming on in the growhouse and spaghetti and twonga squash going waiting for the last frost to go out on the frame.

    In the annual bed I've got a load of varieties of radish, lettuces, asian leaves, parsnips and a few herbs to sow as soon as the last frost date has passed. Then I've got about 8 varieties of brassica growing on the growhouse to put out as I harvest the early salads.

    God this seems like a lot of veg when I write it all down, there's only 2 of us and eat more meat than anything else /img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif
     
  9. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Hehe, wurzel - I know the feeling. White and red radish, salad, spinach and carrots are coming along nicely in the cold frame now, Onions and garlic are peeking out. Put in some sunflower seeds last week. Soon it's time to sow some courgettes and aubergines indoor. Rest of the space is going to be borlotto beans, peas, two kinds of corn, butternut squash, assorted salads and fennel and some potatoes for the heck of it. Some more exotics for the raised herb bed arrived in the mail too yesterday - thai basil, vietnamese coriander, lemongras etc.

    In the fruit department, I got old apple, cherry and pear trees in the garden and my girlfriend went nuts in the berry department - gooseberry, black and red currant, blueberry, each in at least two varieties...

    Lots of veg and fruit for a determined carnivore indeed /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  10. chefross

    chefross

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    At the moment it's 10 degrees outside. There's still large piles of snow all over the backyard. Right up against the house, the very first flowers are starting to come out.

    It's going to be awhile before I grow anything.
     
  11. kccjer

    kccjer

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    Last year my garden produced zilch...nada....nothing.  It was sad.  I have a bed of asparagus that I'm hoping is still viable this year.  Then I'll plant: beans, broccoli, cucumbers, melons, tomatoes (san marzano, if I can find them; cherokee purple....love these!; and don't know what others), okra, chard, carrots, peppers (both sweet and hot), and anything else I can think of!  I have a really nice area that I can use and we built beds using railroad ties.  It's awesome.  Just have to perfect the watering issue.  Chickens ate my rhubarb so gonna have to get another root from my mom.  

     
  12. jessicaskyler83

    jessicaskyler83

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    I have lettuces, radishes, beets,carrots. and something else out there that I can't remember what it is oops.
     
  13. wurzel

    wurzel

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    LOL I've got that too. I'm looking at my annual bed and trying to figure out if all the little green shoots are something I put there or a weed taking over. I wish it was easier to tell what's what when they're small.
     
  14. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Haha, well - I am a biochemist. During my studies, I have been professionally trained to make scientifically accurate determinations of plant and animal species. Think I could tell you what the heck grows in my beds?? No way. At least I the red and white radishes are big enough now so that I can actually discern them! 
     
  15. countrykook

    countrykook

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    tomatoes,onions, zuchinni, beans & ancient native corn 
     
  16. jessicaskyler83

    jessicaskyler83

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    LOL well, It's good to know I am not the only one!
     
  17. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    Last edited: May 9, 2013
  18. bill methatswho

    bill methatswho

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    Our garlic crop was already coming up through the snow in early April and should be a bumper crop this year--nothing beats the garlic we grow in our back yard--the supermarket stuff pales in comparison. We'll plant tomatoes of course, as well as basil, parsley, thyme, rosemary, etc. and maybe some beans, but the herbs are the most important thing after the garlic.
     
  19. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Today I planted two self-watering containers of salad bowl lettuces, Italian flat leaf parsley, sweet basil and oregano (I'm just plain tired of paying for these).  We’ll see how they do on the screened in porch, away from all them critters here in the middle of the desert!  My Ti is almost ready with shoots!!!
     
  20. butzy

    butzy

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    We are going towards winter, so it is time to start sowing coriander (it bolts within a week in summertime), basil, chives and garlic chives.

    My chili's are going strong and I just harvested my first madam Jeanette, a beautiful fragrant and hot pepper.


    My Marjoram and Oregano are still alive and so is my lemon grass and my djeruk purut.