So just how Brilliant/Stupid is the idea of a kitchen being built strictly to rent out wekly or so?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by gunnar, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. gunnar

    gunnar

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    The above about says it all....except.... Now what limitations would you have about it's location or functional size? I know what kind of  commercial kitchens I have worked in and they have ranged from over 2,000 sq ft to just about 400sq ft.

    Also, would a converted warehouse on the edge of a town be fine (if it passes Health inspection)  or is it worth the effort (and cost)  to try and get a more central location?  And if you were to rent this kind of place what equipment would you expect to be on hand for your use?
     
  2. amazingrace

    amazingrace

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    Probably the first thing you need to do is contact environment health services in your area and find out if this is something that can be done.  Naturally,  the kitchen and equipment would have to meet the local health department standards.  Then comes the question of your renter's also being certified,  and meeting heath regulations.   I suppose you could insist they have their certification before renting to them,  but most often this document is tied to a specific location.  I'm not saying it's a bad idea...but I do think it could be complicated.  
     
  3. mikelm

    mikelm

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    "I'm not saying it's a bad idea...but I do think it could be complicated.  "

    Yes.

    You need to do a lot of research about this, even beyond the health requirements.

    For four years I ran a consulting company specializing  in questions of real estate development, location, and financial analysis..

    When asked about a project, we always started with the question..."Who needs it?" You need to find out about this, first-hand.  Most all the caterers in your area undoubtedly have their own kitchens already. So, who might your customers be?

    What is your competition?  Around here, there are several big churches that have near-commercial size kitchen facilities who would be happy to rent them out on a daily basis, and a local community center also does this.  My Rotary club has used this kitchen and common-room spaces for years of annual buffet celebrations - Tex-Mex, or New England lobster boils.

    Frankly, this sounds like a doubtful enterprise to me, unless you can actually identify a specific customer base.  The "If you build it, they will come" proverb probably only works in the movies.

    Mike