So is frozen food really as awful as Gordon Ramsay makes it sound on TV?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by Jonathan K, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    No one knows where in Italy marinara originated. But, it is traditionally accepted that marinara is Italian in origin. In fact the first recorded marinara recipe was written by an Italian chef by the name of Antonio Latini in the 1690's. There are other bits and pieces of history that strongly suggest marinara originated in Italy as well. :)
     
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    You’re right we don’t really know. And I haven’t been everywhere in Italy so it may exist in this form somewhere aside from where I’ve been.

    First try Marcella’s recipe then form an opinion about it.
     
  3. drirene

    drirene

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    Yes @halb, opinions, opinions. I tried Marcella's recipe and just gag. As much as I love butter, I can't do it it tomato sauce.
     
  4. halb

    halb

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    I was waiting for you to try it first. :p
     
  5. harpua

    harpua

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    Oh wow I tried that recipe a few months ago! I did not care for it. I love butter but it was too rich. I would like to try it again when it gets really cold here (about 65 I’m so cal, lol) and see if I appreciate it more then.

    Thanks for the reminder!

    As for the Amy’s Baking Company episode, I believe it was frozen raviolis that Ramsay went off about. I’ve seen that episode about 20 times. I think it was edited to death and the producers really pushed those two to their limits. Anyway, I could talk about that one forever.

    So, yes to frozen ravioli at home, but don’t try to sell them to customers!
     
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  6. loomchick

    loomchick

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    I understand where Gordon Ramsay is coming from . . . at least to a certain point. However, the quality of frozen products is all over the place. Take frozen hamburger patties for example. Some is so inferior that one would have to pay me a significant sum of money to eat one. On the other hand, there are some higher end frozen hamburger patties that are superior to a burger made with a patty where the 'fresh' meat was inferior to begin with and/or wasn't mixed properly with ingredients to help it hold its shape, et.

    'Fresh' doesn't always mean better. Frozen on the other hand can depend on when and how it was frozen . . . and how it was packaged and how long it's been frozen. Frozen ravioli? Fresh ravioli is pretty easy to make. If I'm eating ravioli in a halfway decent restaurant, they better have made it themselves.

    There are also some items . . . like puff pastry . . . that most restaurants would have to be insane to to make from scratch on a regular basis. For the highest end restaurants, they may have the money, space, time, etc. to have a full time pastry chef. But, for most restaurants, they are more than likely going to make do with the resources they have. A quality frozen puff pastry should work okay in most situations.

    Ramsay is a respectable chef . . . however, he's also a character and plays for the camera. I'm sure the producers encourage an occasional tirade it at times. I do think he's behaved better on Master Chef the past few seasons . . . especially in a season's early episodes when they're slogging through and separating the decent home chefs and from the ones that were lucky. And, he can be especially kind and considerate when he's working with kids.
     
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  7. oober

    oober

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    Having a garden, I always have an excess amount of tomatoes. I core and freeze and store in bags in the qty of what I may need for a sauce.

    The cool thing about this is, when I am ready to use, I rinse under hot water and the skins peel right off...

    I cannot tell the difference in sauces when using fresh vs frozen, but then again I haven't done a side by side comparison with tomatoes and nothing else. Maybe next yr I will.
     
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  8. eastshores

    eastshores

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    Sheesh.. people talking about tomatoes like they are somehow fruits of Italy and Italy has some purview over them. Nope. Marinara yea probably.. but get over yourself.
     
  9. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Why can’t you make your point without being rude. So what’s your point regarding frozen food or Ramsay... or tomatoes or marinara?
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2018
  10. eastshores

    eastshores

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    It's not meant to be rude, and not meant to be taken personally. I was responding to the general feeling of superiority in some of the replies.. examples:

    "With less effort you could make a proper sauce."
    "I have no idea why you are using mushrooms, celery, parsley etc. They have no place in a marinara or any other tomato sauce."

    Basically I was replying in the same vein of thought you did "let’s not be snobs and put down the rich traditions of Italian-American variants" .. but my point was that Italians don't have a birth right to the tomato. It didn't even originate in that region of the world.
     
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  11. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Oh, okay. I get it now.
     
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  12. osamaru

    osamaru

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    Honestly, at least when it comes to Veggies, frozen veggies are almost ALWAYS better than fresh.
    That is as long as you are getting good quality frozen veggies. The reason is simple.
    "Fresh" Veggies are not really fresh, they are continuously breaking down. Its much harder to control the "freshness" of fresh veggies, while frozen veggies (if used properly) is much better.
     
  13. osamaru

    osamaru

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    Note, I say almost always, because there ARE veggies that just don't freeze well, and are better of fresh.
     
  14. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I would change "always" to "sometimes". It's hard to say that frozen is better than fresh, in season produce, especially if, since it is "in season" isn't being shipped thousands of miles. I would almost always choose fresh, over frozen, in these cases. But, in the middle of winter and I need sweet corn then I would be using a high quality sweet corn as any corn that I find fresh up here, in winter, will have been shipped thousands of miles and lost all of its sweetness. The same goes for a number of other out of season vegetables. But, in general, I am of the belief that fresh is better than frozen, or canned, with some exceptions.
     
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