snickerdooler and misc question

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by pastrycake, Jun 27, 2012.

  1. pastrycake

    pastrycake

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    I just started reading the Bakewise book to understand the science of baking.  I have a few questions.  I would like to try making snickerdoodle cookie.  I am planning to use the America's test kitchen recipe but compared it with martha's stewarts recipe.  both are identical execept martha's has more cinnamon and slightly less flour.  I did noticed that both uses 1 stick of butter and 1/2 cup of shortening.  Can anyone explain why shortening in snickerdoodles compared to other cookies? 

    Also, second question is devils chocolate cake.  I noticed that a dark moist chocolate cake calls for strong coffee.  Since I do not drink coffee, can I use day old coffee rather than brewing some up just for baking? I may ask my coworker to save me a cup or use coffee from work. 
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    You can use instant coffee
     
  3. rlyv

    rlyv

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    Using day old coffee is fine.  Instant would work as well, but if you don't use it much, why buy it?

    As far as the Snickerdoodle question, I think a lot of old time recipes used shortening more, cost, availability, etc.  Shortening will give you a softer cookie, but adds no flavor.  Butter makes a cookie that is more crisp, but adds a lot more flavor.  I think the combo helps with the texture, since Snicks are usually a softer cookie, at least I like them a little soft in the middle.  I'm usually an all butter person, but some cookies, like this one, I will do the combination. All butter can be used, I've done it before, just personal preference.
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Butter melts at a lower temperature than shortening, thus affecting the spread and texture.

    Butter = thin, crisp cookies

    Shortening = thicker, chewy cookies