Smoked Prime Rib Ribeyes

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Joined Dec 21, 2012
Hello.  Thinking of trying something with a boneless rib.  Normally, I'd just do it and chunk it if I didn't like it, but this is a wee bit expensive for that.

Thinking of pit-smoking a whole ribeye roast for a length of time, then cutting it into ribeye steaks and finish on the grill.  I've heard of it, but never tried it.

Any of you ever do much experimenting along these lines?

Thanks, folks.
 

pete

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I have smoked whole Prime Ribs for eating, but have never cold smoked one to then cut into steaks.  I have done it with tenderloin though and have ended up with a great product.  Just make sure you cold smoke it so that you aren't cooking it while smoking.
 
289
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Joined Dec 21, 2012
Hi.  Thanks for the reply.

I've never done cold smoking, so this is what I have:

My pit will probably not go below around 125 or 130.  Is this too hot?

Possibly, I could get the smoke going and shut temp down all the way to "0" and let the ribeye absorb what it will for as long as the smoke is there.  Then crank it back up to the 125 or so and repeat as needed.

I assume from what you said, the idea is to not let it "cook" at all, right?

If I try this, how much time in the smoke do you think the piece needs to obtain a light smoky flavor?

Thanks for the help, I appreciate it.

I could also cause more smoke in several ways, but in my experience too much smoke will mean at least some bitterness.
 
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pete

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What kind of pit do you have? Is it strictly wood fired or does it have heating elements to create the smoke.  If it has heating elements, oftentimes you can just fire up the element that is used for creating smoke while leaving the other element (more powerful) that is used to heat up the chamber to cooking temp.

If you can't control heat that way, then keep your rib as far from the heat as possible.  I also often use ice when cold smoking to help cool down the smoke an air that is coming off of the burning wood.  No matter what you do you want to keep your smoke moving up and through your smoker.  Don't let it get trapped in there are you will end up with a bitter product as more particles in the smoke have time to land on your meat and give at bitter flavor.

While cold smoking is the best for this, you could do it at the temps you suggest, but just make sure that the outside of the rib doesn't get too done.

If doing a full cold smoke (less than 100°F-preferably around 80°F) I would smoke the whole rib for 2 hours, but if you can only get your chamber down to 120-130°F then I would probably only smoke for about an hour.  Should still give you plenty of smoky flavor.
 
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I think it is unnecessary to cold smoke before grilling steaks the grill should add plenty of that flavor anyway.  A lot of attempts at cold smoking on non cold smoking equipment ends up tasting like dirty smoke. 

For me, it depends if you are cutting thin steaks or thicker steaks.  If you are cutting 2.5"+ steaks, you can smoke at 225-250ish with a charcoal and wood mix.  Then do a reverse sear when you are close to the internal temp you want. i.e. when I see it near 120F I will crank the heat and sear.  The reasons are many:  the steak surface will dry a bit during this indirect cooking time, allowing it to sear better and on my charcoal grill it is much easier to increase the heat than cool it down.  

If you are doing thinner steaks that don't need the indirect heat time, mix in a fist sized chunk of wood or two into the charcoal mix.  Your goal should be to have these burning cleanly.  You can get a lot of smoke flavor into a steak during normal grilling time with charcoal.  If you are using stronger smelling woods it will definitely up the smoke smell-  think hickory, mesquite, pecan

If you're set on trying cold smoke,  my recommendation is to build a legitimate clean burning fire (blue smoke not billowy white smoke) and on your grill's top vent put a dryer vent out to a box on the ground.  You'll get the smoke smell out there but it will be cooler.
 
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Joined Dec 21, 2012
I have a 100% wood-fired rotisserie smoker.

I think for the first time I'll try this:  Smoke in coolest area at 120 for one hour, wrap in butcher paper and smoke for another hour, then to the cooler.  It'll take around 10 minutes to reach 120.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.  Should be fun to see what I wind up with.
 
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166
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Joined Aug 26, 2016
Why are you trying to figure out how "not" to cook it?

Why not cook it to the temp you regularly would?

If anything, cook it to an internal temp of around 110...pull, cool, store.  Then you can slice and bring to temp on your grill.
 

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