Smoked Christmas Goose

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by dineandcook, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. dineandcook

    dineandcook

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    There are several recipes out there for smoked goose but the one that I'm most interested in seems to have the least amount of information.  Larousse Gastronomique mentions the famous smoked pomerania goose, but again a Google search and my library of old cookbooks makes no mention of this dish.  Is anyone familiar with how it is prepared?

    Thanks!
     
  2. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Since nobody else has posted, I'll tell you what I remember, but I make no promises.

    I think this thing is cured and smoked fairly gently, until it is just barely done. The fat does not mostly render out in the process. Then you roast it gently, sort of like a baked ham, and the skin crisps up while the fat pours out in a puddle under the rack.

    I have no idea how precisely the bird is cured, however. If I were going to try that, I'd start by making a brine with lots of herbs and lemon, then brine it for whatever is standard for a turkey of equivalent weight. Pat well dry and let stand uncovered in the fridge for 24 hours to develop a pellicle. Smoke it low and slow with a mild wood like apple, and pull it when the thickest part reads 160F, allowing for carryover to 165F+. Let cool to room temperature, then wrap and chill. Then roast it briefly at 425F until very golden brown and then slowly, maybe 275F or something, until it reads about 155F.

    That's my guess, but I really don't know. Did Google turn up nothing?
     
  3. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    A little surfing, and I'm back.

    1) A Pomeranian goose is a breed popular in Europe. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomeranian_Goose

    2) The recipes I see online just serve it straight out of the smoker. But I'm quite sure I have heard of dishes in Alsace and the like which bake the smoked goose: you buy a smoked goose from the charcuterie and then bake it at home, and then you use all leftovers in cassoulet or choucroute garnie. I know for darn sure this is done with smoked duck, so why not goose?
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Why not goose, you ask? For the same reason goose is not popular at all in America: Cost. At a certain big box store, for instance, I happened to be looking at them earlier this week. At $50+ (more than 6x the price of a similar turkey), they surely don't sell too many of them.