Smoked Brisket!!!

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by petermill, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. petermill

    petermill

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    Heyyy food lovers!!! I wanna try my hand at preparing a smoked brisket. Please give me the best recipe possible. Awaiting responses from all of you. Thanks a lot !!!
     
  2. maryb

    maryb

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    Salt, pepper, smoke... onion/garlic powder are good, some ground celery seed is good...
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Low flame and lots of time.
     
    flipflopgirl likes this.
  4. butzy

    butzy

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    Make sure you got lots of time...
    And it is done, when the meat tells you it is done....

    What type of smoker do you have?
     
  5. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    First I want to welcome you to the new and improved Chef Talk.
    Then I will offer up the fact that smoking meat (even the common brisket) is more of a procedure than a recipe and ask what you already know.
    Have you perused the many threads here on the site?
    Followed any of the TMTC blogs/forums out there?
    Read any books?
    Done something crazy like experimented on your own?

    Not at all trying to avoid your request for advice but if you just dig around a bit...find a technique that looks simple enuf...and just jump in with both feet and then come back with specific questions... helping you would be so much more efficient.

    mimi
     
  6. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I rub my brisket down with lots of salt and pepper and a little granulated garlic. Sometimes, I will also use some ground ancho for just the slightest kick. Then into the smoker, at about 225-230°F for as long as it takes. I've had some whole briskets only take 10-12 hours and others that took 16. Once it's done I like to wrap in foil and let it sit in my oven for about 45-60 minutes with the oven turned on to 150°F. While the cooking is slow and low, I feel that the resting period helps improve it a bit.
     
  7. happyhound

    happyhound

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  8. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I just happen to have a brisket on the smoker right now, went on at eight this morning, most likely be babysitting it well past bedtime.
    I go simple, kosher salt and cracked black pepper in equal amounts.
    I try to cook at about 250. Currently using a mix of briquettes and alder logs, because that's the only hardwood I can get here.
    I also agree with Pete on the rest period.
     
  9. maryb

    maryb

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    Liquid smoke? BLECH!
     
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  10. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    That's a no go area for me. I bought a pork dish from a local place the other day, took one bite and threw it into the garbage. Loaded with liquid smoke. I had that nasty smell in my nose hairs for hours after.
    BBQ sauce is the only place that stuff belongs.
     
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  11. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I rarely use liquid smoke, but I do have a bottle of it and I find uses for it, occasionally. The most important thing with the stuff is to use it super sparingly-I'm talking a drop or 2. It is powerful stuff and can easily overpower a dish, and a person's senses, as chefbuba described.
     
  12. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    IMG_1877.PNG
    I just figured out how to post photos on the new platform and there seems to be a size requirement that was not there before. This is straight from iPhone.
    @nicko, @phatch
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2017
  13. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the alert.
     
  14. MarieKitchenGirl

    MarieKitchenGirl

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    I love spending time in the kitchen :-)
  15. LZ365

    LZ365

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    Welcome to chef talk!! I agree that it’s more about technique than a recipe. Brisket, pork butt, ribs, roast etc.. are tough tough cuts, so long and slow cooking is best for breaking down connective tissue. I wouldn’t go over 225 for brisket and make sure to put it fat side up on your smoker. You can use a Texas crutch as well which is wrapping it in plastic wrap ( make sure it’s thick like from a restaurant supply store) and foil, or red butcher paper after about 6 hours on the smoker. Traditional seasoning for brisket in Tx ( mostly East Tx) is just salt and pepper and lots of each. I generally go 12-14 hours on a 10-12lb brisket, also spraying with apple cider vinegar about halfway through and at the end does wonders for flavor and moisture retention. Another good tip is DO NOT peek at it let it cook at least 10 hours if not doing a crutch then check it. If your looking your not cooking. Have fun!!!