Smoke in the Kitchen

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by brandonknill, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. brandonknill

    brandonknill

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    Hey,

    So I prepared a simple Baked paprika chicken dish today (Smoked Paprika/garlic/olive oil paste on flattened a chicken breast) and cooked it in the oven on the broil (450F) for 6 min each side (on a tin foiled cookie sheet). The chicken came out splended, however, at about 5 min in on the first side, I managed to fill my kitchen full of smoke to the point that the smoke alarm went off. I'm pretty sure that it was the excess paste burning. I was wondering if there is any tricks or techniques I could use to reduce/eliminate the excess smoke. I was thinking of putting the chicken on the rack and placing a tray with water under it to catch the excess and reduce the smoking, does anyone know if this would work? By the way, I dont have any windows in my kitchen and the fume hood sucks (yes it was on).

    Sincerely,

    Brandon
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    When cooking at this hi a heat on a broiler with no ventelation and no windows I don't know if anything would work. Maybe if you did whole process in oven?
     
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    All hoods, to function effectively, have to have make-up air, i.e. a source of ait to replace what is being exhausted, no make-up air, no exhaust, period.
     
  4. brandonknill

    brandonknill

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    Yah I thought as much, ahh well. I guess I'll just pull the batteries out of the smoke alarm before cooking.
     
  5. alergkvegtarian

    alergkvegtarian

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    Your number one problem might be your marinade. Extra Virgin Olive Oil has a smoking point of between 200 F (100C) and 400 F (200 C) depending on brand. The higher the quality, the lower the smoking point. You need to use a Light Olive Oil instead. This has a smoking point of about 460 F.

    My kitchen does not have a window. I open the nearest window in the other room. You'll still have to take the battery out, but at least it does help a little with ventilation. We are suppose to prevent smoking as much as possible as this means that a fire is very likely, which instills fear in the fire chief when its inside a house.

    A broiler pan is used to help the drippings fall away and not burn. However, the oven still needs to be watched and the temperature adjusted because when broiling, foods can burn easily.

    What you need to watch out for is that water and oil/grease can cause fires. This is why I don't recommend using plain water. Also, if its smoking, then the food is getting too hot. I'd lower the temperature. The door to the oven also needs to be left open ajar or the oven will reach full temperature, which we need to prevent. This is what keeps the oven from baking the food, instead of "grilling" it. Lastly, the more fat you have, the more smoke you can get.

    Hope this helps you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Not sure what resources you refer to, however:
    • 200°F = 182.2°C
    • 400°F = 382.2°C
    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil smoke point = 320°F/160°C
    • Virgin Olive oil = 420°F/216°C
    • Extra light olive oil = 468°F/242°
    x°C = (y°F-32)/1.8

    y°F = (x°C * 1.8)+32
     
  7. brandonknill

    brandonknill

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    Okay, I hadn't thought about the oil smoking but that is something worth trying. I think that the main source of smoke came from the excess paprika in the marinade was causing the burning. I'll try lowering the temperature.
     
     
  8. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Leaving oven door open just increases the amount of oxygen to fuel the inferno also keeps oven running at high capacity to make up for lost heat. Also what Pete pointed out your smoking point temps are all off. You cannott possibly do what we do in a restaurant with house stoves and  broilers, you will die from the fumes and burn the place down and all of your nicely painted walls will turn color and be coated with a layer of grease plus your house wioll smell forever. So don't even try.
     
  9. brandonknill

    brandonknill

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    @chefdb I wasn't going to leave the oven open; the electrical bill is high enough!
     
  10. chefedb

    chefedb

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    You were not but read Alergkveg above answer to you Re"leave door ajar"
     
  11. brandonknill

    brandonknill

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    Yah, lol I kinda just glossed over that ;) It sounded kinda silly to me
     
  12. alergkvegtarian

    alergkvegtarian

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    Personally, I would never use the broiler for something best done on a grill as I do not like the smoke or fire risk.  http://bbq.about.com/cs/cookingtips/a/aa112302a.htm has information on BBQing and grilling in the oven. However, depending on what type of oven you have, broiling with the door open can damage the control panel (especially on some Thermador Ovens). And, some ovens now turn off when the door is open. And, like I said, the fire risk is not worth it. When a food is smoking, the fire risk is just too great! (Side note: Many mothers used to broil in their oven with the door left ajar. The oven was never left unattended and the result worked well. They adjusted the temperature as needed to help prevent smoke. Houses did not burn down. Newer ovens may not allow this method. They also didn't use Water as Oil dripping into water can cause fires!)

    Like I said, different brands of Olive Oil will claim different smoking points.

    Apparently, there is a difference of opinion as to which temp is correct. Cooking sites say I am correct, but one Scientific site says you are correct.

    EDIT: I read one chart wrong. I should know better then to comment at 1am! Oops!

    This link says that you convert 400 to 204.4 C. And 182.2 = 356 F.

    http://www.reawire.com/Products/Tec...version/tabid/164/language/en-US/Default.aspx

    http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/134/Oven-Temperatures

    http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/convert/measurements.html

    http://cookingwithshirley.com/CONVERSIONCHARTFROMFAHRENHEITTOCELSIUS.htm

    http://www.cooks.com/rec/dnd_nf2c.html

    At any rate, if its smoking, the temp is too high, regardless of what the thermometer says. (And no, I do not believe everything I read online. However, I do not use my broiler for grilling.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
  13. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    You might try searing the chicken in a pan first and then finishing in the oven at a lower temp.