Slow dry-baking HUGE short ribs in the oven

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by french fries, May 9, 2019.

  1. french fries

    french fries

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    So here in France we're getting those HUGE short ribs (while most everything is bigger in the States vs in France, cows seem to be the exception).

    Just got two short ribs (just about 4 lbs).

    So nostalgia here we go, now that I live in France I'm craving good old American barbecue, and I'm trying to somehow imitate a barbecued beef rib with barbecue sauce.

    So far I made a rub of:
    • Smoked paprika
    • Onion powder
    • Garlic powder
    • Cumin powder (very little)
    • Salt
    • Black pepper
    • White pepper

    I placed them in a dish covered with foil and they're now in a 300F oven. I'm guessing for about 4 hours total.

    I'm going to make a barbecue sauce with chipotle peppers in adobo and... not sure what else. Maybe apple cider vinegar, ketchup...?

    I suppose for the last 1/2 hour I'll uncover, baste with sauce and continue baking to glaze.

    Sounds like a plan?

    Wondering if I'm missing anything or how they will turn out.
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Sound like a good plan. I’m jealous that you can get good beef ribs.
     
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  3. maryb

    maryb

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    IMPS 123A beef short rib plate, I have to order them by the case when I want them because nobody carries them. For some reason stores only have these beef ribs with no meat...

    [​IMG]

    Great slow smoked(not my picture... I haven't made these for 2 years due to cost of a case)

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. french fries

    french fries

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    Guess I'm really lucky. This is a cheap cut here. Must have been less than $10 for the 4 lbs. And they're MUCH bigger and meatier than on your photographs. I'll have to take a pic next time.

    Well they turned out good. Not great, but very good. Not great because I felt that while some parts were the desired "fall of the bone" texture (I'm rarely looking for fall of the bone but this time around that's exactly what I was going for), other parts were a little on the dry side.

    After the 3h1/2 mark I removed the foil and the ribs, which were tightly nested in a dish, were sitting in their own juices (mostly fat?) up to above half their height. I removed all liquid/fat, basted, and put back in the oven uncovered for about 45mn.

    Still, very good, and I'll do it again. And I'll take pics next time.
     
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  5. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Forget about pictures... just send a rib an I’ll let you know how you succeeded!
     
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  6. french fries

    french fries

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    :lol:
     
  7. butzy

    butzy

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    Guess that makes 2 of us FF...
    They are reasonably prices here at around 3 U$ per kg. They just cut them differently, but I actually don't mind that.
    (Mind you, beef fillet is currently 6.5 U$ per kg :) )
     
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  8. french fries

    french fries

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    Wow your prices are even lower. Crazy. I think those were about $5 per kg.
     
  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Now I know for sure the French are insane. ;-)~ Would have to be to think these to be relegated to cheapest cut, especially considering the high price of beef in France $2.50/lb is insane.

    The Scandinavians don't care for pork ribs, though they grow mighty meaty ones, and they sell these comparatively cheap.

    The amount of meat on the rib depends on the place it is cut from, I've seen meat sticking up about 2" from the bone.

    If you are cooking open and dry you need to be very careful with temp/time. There is a very small window between a perfect gelatinous breakdown of tissue to much less satisfying stages of dryness. I don't make them often enough to be consistant here.
     
  10. french fries

    french fries

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    Pork ribs are ridiculously inexpensive here as well (about the same price $2.50/lb) which means I'm constantly cooking pork ribs. :rofl:

    For the short ribs I got it was closer to 4" or 5" from the bone. Really huge. But then again cows are much bigger here so every cut is bigger. Last time I ordered a bone-in rib-eye from my butcher it came at about 4lbs.

    I'd love to but have never tried that, these were cooked covered in parchment and foil.
     
  11. maryb

    maryb

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    Wish I could find them here! This is all they carry around me and they are more bone than meat and stupid expensive

    [​IMG]
     
  12. butzy

    butzy

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    Strange how things go....
    Real expensive here (compared to the other meat cuts) are oxtail and pork ribs.
    I can buy fillet or rump steak for less per kg than oxtail or pork ribs
     
  13. teamfat

    teamfat

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    The beef back ribs such as the ones Mary B. posted I basically only use for making stock anymore, rarely meaty enough to make a meal.

    The short ribs available at the major mega market here in Salt Lake look like these, this was actually one o the better looking packages:

    short_ribs.jpg

    When roasting low and slow I usually give them a generous rub of kosher salt, put in a plastic bag and let sit in the fridge for an hour or two or so. Rinse, pat dry, light dusting of black pepper, garlic powder, maybe hot or smoked paprika. Into a cast iron skillet, bone side down, roast at 275F for about 2.5 - 3 hours depending on thickness. Not falling apart, melt in your mouth tender, they still have a bit of "tooth" to them. Here's one from a batch I did a couple weeks ago, along with some parmesan dusted braised leeks:

    20190426_093955.jpg

    In general, a tasty cut of beef.

    mjb.
     
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  14. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Well actually you can find really big ribs in the States, but not so much here in the North East. But meat 5" high before cooking, that does seem to sound of a genetically modified beast.
     
  15. french fries

    french fries

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    Hmmm no, none of those here. Like I said, cattle is different here from cattle in the states. MUCH bigger. Every cut of meat is bigger. You'd never dream of eating a T-bone alone here, it would be a meal for several people.

    A quick google search turned out:
    • Average weight of a Charolaise cow is 2,000 lbs
    • Average weight of an Angus cow is 1,150 lbs