Single bevel question

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by markos sdranis, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. markos sdranis

    markos sdranis

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    Hello, I've been considering adding a single bevel gyuto to my knife roll. I considered an usuba but I have a santoku and I prefer my chef's knife, and from what I gather a santoku is close to an usuba. I read it's easier to make paper thin cuts with a single bevel, which makes sense considering it's thinner. I also read it takes time to get used to it and make straight cuts.

    What I'd like to know from people who've used them is, is the difference really noticeable and did you struggle with using double bevel knives after getting used to a single bevel? I really don't want to have to replace every knife.

    Thank you for your time,

    Markos
     
  2. markos sdranis

    markos sdranis

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  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    If you want to do this


    Go for an usuba. Otherwise stay away from single bevels.
     
    rick alan likes this.
  4. markos sdranis

    markos sdranis

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    Is that all single bevel knives are good for? Can I not use a single bevel gyuto/usuba instead of a double bevel knife? There was a thread explaining single bevel vs double bevel and from what I understood you get less stickage and you can make fine brunoise easier than with a double bevel as it is thinner. I don't really need a new chef's knife/gyuto but after I tried my first gyuto I just really really REALLY like japanese knives.
     
  5. rick alan

    rick alan

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    You have to spend real money to get a good single bevel, one that's ground properly so it will sharpen properly. But any decent gyuto with a good amount of flat area gives you about 90%. There are many youtube vids showing katsurumaki being done quite well with ordinary gyuto. But what that guy above is doing, real paper thin and consistent, well that's what an usuba is for.

    I cut real thin with a gyuto, and a petty for the small stuff like garlic, shallot and celery. Celery is the easiest, like down to 0.25mm. Onions I could consistently get down to between .5-1mm with a bigger flatter knife. I still keep it under 1mm pretty much. Nice for salads and they make a nice garnish when they fold up under their own weight.
     
  6. markos sdranis

    markos sdranis

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    I'm not blaming my tools, I don't need a new knife, by easier I meant I got addicted to getting my knives sharper and sharper, and I'm interested in the novelty of a single bevel knife. I don't want to burn my money though, and I have no experience with an usuba which is why I was looking at a gyuto.

    If I do go the usuba way, I see there are two types, the kama usuba and the usuba. Which way should I go?
     
  7. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    I'd avoid the usuba. You'll have to relearn more or less everything. I've never seen a single bevel gyuto before, but it might work, though it seems kind of pricey just to experiment.