Shrimp and Grits.

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Grits is made from even more coarsely ground hominy-dried corn treated with food grade lime, an alkali.
This is true of hominy grits, but not all grits are hominy grits.
 
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Call it what you want, it looks like a pretty solid dish to me. Personally, I'm not a huge fan of bacon in shrimp and grits. Get's a bit overpowering. The recipe I always use is pretty similar with the addition of white wine and a touch of cream in the sauce.
 
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Where is your restaurant I want to try your shrimp and grits!

blsenf98
Were Big Daddy's Ship Store, a floating marina restaraunt on Grapevine Lake near DFW airport in Tx.  Mind you, being on a lake means our menu is seasonal.  Shrimp and Grits usually only fly durin the warmer months ;) 

PM me for details
 
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I've never really messed with grits before, I would like to have them on our menu this spring but I have a couple questions. First off, how can you hold the grits once they are cooked? Can you par-cook them to certain point then finish in a saute pan? I assume that if I make a big pot for service they will set up right? I want to stay away from instant for sure but was thinking about using quick grits... I was also thinking that if I use "real" grits I would have a better chance of par-cooking without them turning to shit as they sit. Anyway, any help from you fine southern folk would be appreciated!
 
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I'd really need a good southern cook to hold my hand and teach me how to make proper grits. To be honest, everytime I had some, I was rather underwhelmed, but I think there is something to it when done right.
 
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A friend of mine gave me some grits from Booneville Flour & Feed.  So good we placed a joint order and they came in last week.  These are some of the best grits I've made in a long time.  Better than Red Mills IMO.  Also got some other product.  Take a look - I am not affiliated just a happy customer.

http://www.boonvillemill.com/Products.html
 

dillbert

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there's the "mechanical" aspect and the "flavoring" aspect.

using Quaker Oats "Old Fashion" grits - not the instant cooking kind....

I make two sizes:

55 grams grits to 375 grams of water

85 grams grits to 565 grams of water

get the warm warm to simmering, add salt to taste

using a whisk, slowly stir in the girts

switch to wooden spoon after grits set up a bit.

add 2 tsp (small batch) / 1 tbsp (large batch) butter - optional

simmer gently for about 10 minutes

care required; it gets thick it will burn on the bottom; flame tamer good idea...

you can 'adjust' the consistency to your preference at the end.

longer they cook, thicker they get - a lot of folk fine pasty thick grits unappealing, me included.

but I find 'thinning down' grits that have gone to glue not a workable solution.

grits are corn; some salt needed

must be thousands of different "flavorings" -

grated cheese topping one of our favs

you can also mix cheese into the girts in the pot

eggs bacon grits with a dollop of maple syrup

(breakfast) gravies of every sort - white, red-eye
 
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Old post but a good one at that. The whole Grits, corn meal, polenta discussion has been covered so.............

When you are talking about grits, the hands down place to purchase them from is.......Logan Turnpike Mills in Blairsville, Georgia! Their website is easily found on the web and they will ship everywhere.

There are many versions to this so I don't want to say this is not an authentic version. One thing about shrimp grits is, they have a deep heritage completely rooted in the South's Low-Country so I would say the topping with whole shrimp is a more modern version. Yet, the method I'm most familiar and fond of doesn't use whole shrimp as a topping, but rather the shrimp is made into a paste and then topped on the hot, steaming grits.

I learned this from a Chef I worked with in Atlanta, Scott Peacock. He called for us to stir the shrimp paste into the grits and per his quote, "this gives the grits a very nice coral hue". I believe Edna Lewis was the one who inspired this on his menu and she has some wonderful and in many cases very simple old southern recipes. I even believe some date back to before the "war between the states". Anyhow, the flavor is carried through the grits and is out of this world!

It's typically served with toast points for dipping but have used warm or toasted flat-bread and also, grilled flat-bread (raw dough grilled over wood fire) with success. This version of the dish makes a great side-dish, accompaniment or appetizer. For an entree, I would suggest sticking with the version of whole shrimp and other ingredients as a topping. I would tend to believe this is the version most of our guests would picture in their minds when ordering.
 
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When you are talking about grits, the hands down place to purchase them from is.......Logan Turnpike Mills in Blairsville, Georgia! Their website is easily found on the web and they will ship everywhere.
No it isn't.  I get mine, Yelton's Best Stone Ground, from Lakeside Mills in North Carolina.  Actually there are a number of places such as these two that do real good grits, the way they have been doing them for the last two - three hundred years.

Don't waste your time with grits produced west of the Mississippi.

mjb.
 
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Peel and clean about half a pound of shrimp.  Shrimp go in a bowl,
shells go into a sauce pan.  Put shrimp in fridge, cover shells with
water.  Add a bay leave, some black peppercorns and a dash or two of
Old Bay type seasoning.  Put on a back burner, bring to barely a simmer.
Set temp on oven to 400 F. put 9" cast iron skillet in there to heat up as well.


Pour some wine, waste a bit of time on Facebook.

Mix up the cornbread batter. Remove skillet, put in a nice knob of butter, swirl
it around, put batter in skillet, put skillet in oven.  Strain the shrimp stock.
Put back in pot over medium high heat, reduce for a bit.  Put small fry pan over
medium heat.  Add about two tablespoons butter, maybe a tablespoon olive oil.
When butter melts, turn off heat.  Add a couple smushed garlic cloves and a nice
sprinkle of crushed red pepper.  Let steep.


More wine, more computer.  Zip out to garage fridge, grab bowl of pickle meat.
Along the way grab a green onion from the patch north of the garage.

Measure out 2 cups of the shrimp stock.  Bring to boil.  Add 1/2 cup grits,
slowly whisking them in.  Mince shallot and small dice on a little piece of
the pickle meat.  Put the the pan with the butter back on medium low heat.
Sweat the shallot.  Add the pickle meat.

How's the cornbread coming along?


Looks a little dry - perhaps I misjudged on the amount of wine?

Put the shrimp in the pan with the shallot and pickle meat.  Turn the heat off the grits.  Stir in about half a cup of grated cheddar.  Stir the shrimp.  Put a blob of grits on the plate, along with a wedge of cornbread.  Top with some shrimp, garnish with the green onion.


Oops, a little too much butter from the shrimp - whatever will I do?
 
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I'm gonna regret putting this up, but I was the CDC of a small Southern inspired restaurant in SF for a hot minute and the Jazz center that we were connected to wanted to do a video on a classic southern dish.  Here's our take on shrimp and grits.  I still havent watched it all the way through because I cant stand watching myself on video.

 
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Peel and clean about half a pound of shrimp.  Shrimp go in a bowl,
shells go into a sauce pan.  Put shrimp in fridge, cover shells with
water.  Add a bay leave, some black peppercorns and a dash or two of
Old Bay type seasoning.  Put on a back burner, bring to barely a simmer.
Set temp on oven to 400 F. put 9" cast iron skillet in there to heat up as well.


Pour some wine, waste a bit of time on Facebook.

Mix up the cornbread batter. Remove skillet, put in a nice knob of butter, swirl
it around, put batter in skillet, put skillet in oven.  Strain the shrimp stock.
Put back in pot over medium high heat, reduce for a bit.  Put small fry pan over
medium heat.  Add about two tablespoons butter, maybe a tablespoon olive oil.
When butter melts, turn off heat.  Add a couple smushed garlic cloves and a nice
sprinkle of crushed red pepper.  Let steep.


More wine, more computer.  Zip out to garage fridge, grab bowl of pickle meat.
Along the way grab a green onion from the patch north of the garage.

Measure out 2 cups of the shrimp stock.  Bring to boil.  Add 1/2 cup grits,
slowly whisking them in.  Mince shallot and small dice on a little piece of
the pickle meat.  Put the the pan with the butter back on medium low heat.
Sweat the shallot.  Add the pickle meat.

How's the cornbread coming along?


Looks a little dry - perhaps I misjudged on the amount of wine?

Put the shrimp in the pan with the shallot and pickle meat.  Turn the heat off the grits.  Stir in about half a cup of grated cheddar.  Stir the shrimp.  Put a blob of grits on the plate, along with a wedge of cornbread.  Top with some shrimp, garnish with the green onion.


Oops, a little too much butter from the shrimp - whatever will I do?
What is "Pickle Meat"?
 
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   2 pounds boneless pork butt, cut into 2-inch cubes
    1 quart distilled white vinegar
    1/2 cup mustard seed
    1 tablespoon celery seed
    2 tablespoons Tabasco sauce
    1 bay leaf
    6 cloves garlic, peeled and cracked (not smashed)
    1 tablespoon kosher salt
    12 peppercorns 

Put it all in a suitable container, stash in the fridge for a few days, maybe a week. I'm sure it will be ruined if you use 11 or 13 peppercorns /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

mjb.
 
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   2 pounds boneless pork butt, cut into 2-inch cubes
    1 quart distilled white vinegar
    1/2 cup mustard seed
    1 tablespoon celery seed
    2 tablespoons Tabasco sauce
    1 bay leaf
    6 cloves garlic, peeled and cracked (not smashed)
    1 tablespoon kosher salt
    12 peppercorns 

Put it all in a suitable container, stash in the fridge for a few days, maybe a week. I'm sure it will be ruined if you use 11 or 13 peppercorns /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

mjb.
I see - thanks!
 
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