Should I Wing a Line Cook job?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by tomg, May 28, 2014.

  1. tomg

    tomg

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    I have cooked at home for years, and part-timed being a short-order cook during the summer. A job recently came up for a line cook at a local restaurant and I applied, thinking that it was a beginner position, since no school or anything was required. I have zero experience in a real kitchen (a concession stand doesn't count) and it turns they want a real line cook. Scarily enough, it seems I will get the job. Do you think it would be possible to wing it and learn on the job, or should I remind them I don't have line cook experience. Because the money's pretty good... :( Any replies would help a ton!
     
  2. minas6907

    minas6907

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    I would be upfront with them. If you want to try to wing it, they'll find out easily enough, I'd just be honest so as to set their expectation. But that doesn't mean that with some time on the job you can't learn some skills.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
     
  3. vic cardenas

    vic cardenas

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    They gave you the job. It sounds like they decided to give you a try despite your resume (which I'm assuming they actually looked at). 
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
  4. theperegrine

    theperegrine

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    Agreed. Hopefully they at least took the time to look at your qualifications before making the hire.

    I'd make sure they know, but I'm sure they hired/are going to hire you for a reason. Everyone has to start somewhere - if you're willing to learn I'd recommend you do it.
     
  5. shadrap jones

    shadrap jones

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    If you told them your experience, then there is no reason to remind them. Line "short order" cooks will know with-in minutes, of your skill level. Learn, "Hell yeh",but be pro active. Asked questions, learn the menu, where is the products you'll need to do your job. Prep is a big part of the battle. Help, help and help some more, pay attention to the best cooks there. Don't complain about any task(s).Show up 15 minutes before you have to. Don't call-in, work when ever you are asked, days off, overtime. Good luck ! you'll do fine.
     
    tweakz likes this.
  6. tweakz

    tweakz

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    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  7. westbigballin

    westbigballin

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    I can definitely relate and offer my experiences/advice

    Cliffs:

    -Love cooking

    -Applied last summer to a little "restaurant" back home in Hawaii (plate lunch place, as they call it)

    -3 man crew: salad person to take orders, carver/cashier, and grill cook (basic grilling and prep)

    -Worked it for 2 1/2 months, so easy a caveman could have done it. I don't consider it a true high volume restaurant / line cook setting 

    Fast forward to last month

    -Applied for line cook at a gastropub

    -Got the job, was pretty upfront about ^, and omitted a short gig I did at the campus watering hole as a cook (which was way more relevant to this current gastropub gig)

    Now

    -Currently rocking this current line cook gig, and I love it.

    Conclusion: (in my opinion/words anyways)

    Cooking isn't hard. Just go in with an open mind and be willing to learn and work hard since they gave you the opportunity. They're taking the risk/chance by offering you a job, make the most of it. IMO learning on the job is the best way to learn things.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  8. hypotheles

    hypotheles

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    I too will be winging a line cook job.  Fortunately, they know that I am a rookie on the line and only have about 6 months experience at a chain restaurant in the back of the house.

    I am also coming from 24 years of experience in the construction industry, but I am done running that rat race.  Too many hard time resulting from layoffs.  Too much time away from my family.  So, needless to say, I am a 41 year old starting over in an industry that I have a passion for.  I love to cook, mind you the only experience I have is from my own kitchen.  I should have started this a long time ago.

    Anyways, I have done my research and know the ups and down of not only the culinary arts profession as well as starting at the bottom as a short order chef.  I understand the pay is minimal, long and late hours, and the conditions behind the line.  But what I am most looking forward to is not only doing something that I have wanted to do for a long time, but the chain I will be working for wants to put me through a Kitchen Professional program and thinks we all can benefit from my years of management experience, albeit in the construction industry.  Sounds great to me.  My goal is to learn all facets of the kitchen, learn about food and food prep, and put in the hours and effort to be great at my new career.

    With that said, I would appreciate any positive and motivating advice to help me transition into my new role and how to get good at it quick.
     
  9. jimmy lauria26

    jimmy lauria26

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    shift is very important most shifts overlap breakfast into lunch, lunch into dinner and dinner into perhaps a bar menu. you should find out what shift you would be working. Usually lunch or late night bar food would be good for someone with no line experience. the rushes are not as long people usually get in and out cause of it being a break not a leisurely dinner. Bar food is usually deep fried items and maybe burgers and steaks. these shifts will greatly familiarize you with not only the line but the kitchen it will also allow you to ask many questions to learn as much as you can. never turn down hours, always complete tasks and when there seems like theres nothing else to do clean clean clean. remember ther is never any downtime in a kitchen. with this always in mind you should be fine. one more thing a lot of restaurants would rather have someone hard working then with tons of experience that way they have no bad habits and they can train them their own way.

    GOODLUCK
     
  10. hypotheles

    hypotheles

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    thanks Jimmy.  i will be working 60 hours a week and from 3 or 4 pm until late night bar is clean.  
     
  11. grande

    grande

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    Are you working 6 days or are you working until 4 in the morning?
     
  12. hypotheles

    hypotheles

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    I found out today that the program I will be in will be 4 12's from 7 am to 7 pm.  I am sure at some point that will change.
     
  13. hypotheles

    hypotheles

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    The good thing is that I will be in a training program, Kitchen Professional, and will train in all phases in the back of the house. 4 12's from 7am to 7pm
     
  14. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Yeah, it should be more like 5 or 6 twelves /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif   The days will get shorter when you retire /img/vbsmilies/smilies/chef.gif  
     
    grande likes this.
  15. cheffred

    cheffred

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    Wow.
     
  16. lagom

    lagom

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    @cheflayne

    The days get shorter when you die.

    FTFY :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2014
  17. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    The day I die is probably the day I can finally retire. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
     
  18. lagom

    lagom

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    Exactly, and then we will still get calls to work extra shifts.