Should I exchange my knife? Shun to Moritaka

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by bradh, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. bradh

    bradh

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    My parents really made me happy with purchasing a very expensive Shun Kaji 7" Santoku for Christmas this year. Within their ability, it is essentially the best knife they could have purchased for me.

    However, I feel like while it looks amazing and seems like I could make it perform perfectly well over the years, I might be happier with something like this guy in my hands:

    http://www.chefknivestogo.com/moritaka8.html

    I have read many forum posts about different knives and different perspectives. As a mechanical engineering student, I understand the steel differences and I am ready to invest in a sharpening stone (Still trying to decide which will be best) as well as a honing steel or ceramic not to mention the time investment for regular use. Any preferences on this would also help out.  Currently looking into norton or shapton stone, and looking into idahone for a honer.

    The cost difference is about $50 which could go towards the stone, but I am not sure. Would the moritaka be a much better blade? Is it just up to my personal skill level anyways? Does Shun still have lifetime sharpening going on? A little feedback in this regard would be great. I was also looking at a Tojiro, but I love the kurouchi and classic look of the moritaka and the reviews and what I have read are splendid.

    Thank you very much, and Merry Christmas / Happy Holidays all. As you can imagine part of the equation is to make sure I dont upset my parents or make them feel like they failed me at picking out an awesome knife, they did an amazing job which I will make sure they know.

    -Brad
     
  2. ordo

    ordo

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    No possible comparison. First check with CKTG that the Moritaka is flawless (there're some stories about Moritakas) and go for it.
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Just a suggestion, but it seems to me that you are overthinking the situation.  You received a very nice knife from your loving parents.  To return it would be an insult to them.  There is no way around that even if they "give you their blessing" to get what you really want.  Suggest you put that new knife to good use and let them know how much you enjoy it.  Get a job and save some money and THEN buy the knife of your dreams.  You WILL enjoy it.  It won't take long to save 200 bucks.  The knife you want is a beauty, but...
     
  4. dhmcardoso

    dhmcardoso

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    If the Shun is your first good knife, I agree with Brian. If it is not, if you already have a really good one, talk to your parents and exchange it. the Moritaka is for shure, much better. but there are also some other really good options.
     
  5. chrismit

    chrismit

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    Im not sure how many people here have actually used the shun you are talking about. The info I saw indicated it was made with sg2 and not vg10. The complaints about shun knives are usually in regards to the heat treat on the vg10. I'm not telling you to keep the knife I just want you to be sure you know what you have. I don't know what the heat treat on the sg2 is but I'm guessing it will hold an edge for a long time. If you are interested in the moritaka make sure you are ready for the maintenance of carbon. That is not a knife that can be left lying around without proper maintenance. If carbon is not your thing you may want to consider a semi stainless or stainless if you decide to swap it (your shun is stainless)
     
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I wasn't planning on bringing that up, mostly because I always seem to be on the "other" side of the argument... but since you mention it I hope you don't mind me using your comment to add a few potentially contrarian thoughts: 

    VG10 will perform exceptionally well in a home kitchen and retain a blazingly sharp edge for a long time.  It really doesn't require more than steeling and occasional touch up on stones.  If one is clumsy and drops it there is a risk of breaking a tip.  If one uses it to slam-chop like a cleaver or has a tendency to twist  to break bones there is a risk of chipping the blade.  If one uses it correctly and responsibly then it is a fine tool.

    Ask me how I know; I have several VG10 knives all of which are Shun and never had the problems some seem to encounter... and I work them hard in a home environment, and I'm rather discriminating about performance, and I've had plenty of years to compare with German steel and American Carbon and French Carbon.

    My personal feeling (if you don't mind me using your comment to launch into a minor rant) is that sometimes there is a tendency to get "geek" on the topic of knives with wonton disregard for the basic requirements.  Other times there is a tendency to confuse and erroneously compare the needs of a professional kitchen with that of a home kitchen.  It has been a long time since I was in a professional kitchen... but I remember well the differences.  The environments and tools are totally different.  Oh... and then there is the ego factor.  Mind you, I have no problem with ego (mine or anyone else's) so if that is how one wants to choose a knife then I'm okay with that too.  :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2013
  7. chrismit

    chrismit

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    Brian, I wasn't making a comment about shun vg10 I was merely trying to point out to the OP what he is likely to hear about shun vg10 and that he doesn't in fact have this steel. I have owned shun vg10 and had no real complaints.
     
  8. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Understood... and good clarification.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2013
  9. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    This many times over...yes, yes, yes...couldn't agree more. Also after putting the gift to use for a while, your knife skills, your sharpening skills, and your knife knowledge concerning your own personal preferences will have increased tenfold and you will be in a much better posiition to make an informed acquistion when it comes to your next knife.
     
  10. benuser

    benuser

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    +1! Use it, and enjoy it.
    Once you've earned the money get the knife you want. But stay away from the Moritaka as long as its reseller is unable to correctly address the numerous serious overgrind issues.