Shopping ...

2,757
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Joined Jan 4, 2011
We made a coupla-3 videos today. Before you can cook anything ... you gotta shop. Anyway ... Here I am shopping ...



PLEASE ... Watch the whole video ... and MAKE COMMENTS.


"We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
 
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It's "Jeannie's Table", not Julie.

Back when I started cooking ... in 1966 ... my very first instructor was named Genevieve. Everyone called her Jeannie. She has been the most influential person in my culinary life.

My show was first called "Jeannie's Kitchen", but we found out that that name was already functional by a video chef in NewYork. If by some odd lucky chance that I get big enough to have enough views and followers, I don't want to have to deal with any legal actions. That's why the change. ... Anyway ... that's the basis of the name.

Thank You for asking.
 
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Great job! I really liked the content, how your approached the subject, and your presentation. Speaking as a a life-long video professional, I noticed some technical aspects, particularly in the editing, that could easily be improved.

Some of the pans were too quick and some, too long. Editing needs to be tighter. Consider using some soft edits, where you start talking while still on the onions, for example.

One little thing — your camera op needs to be more decisive. For example, when you brought out your shopping list, he/she couldn’t decide whether to focus on you or the list, and ended up in the middle, shooting your tummy. Your shooter needs to decide quickly, and commit to that decision.

Overall, I think you have a great video! I enjoyed it. Lots of good tips, too,
 
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Nice job. I'd appreciate knowing the name of the dish you're cooking at the beginning of the video; What dish you're shopping for.
And what summer57 said.
Otherwise I'm enjoying your videos and looking forward to more. What part of the country are you in?
 
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Thank You so much summer57, for your opinion and commentary. Let my now just reply to those comments ... LOL.

First off ... as for the editing ... We don't "edit". ... We shoot and publish. High quality technical easy. As for the "tummy" shot ... It's a nice tummy ... we were going for the "hungry while shopping" idea.

Thank you again my friend. Be aware that I've got I think a half-dozed videos up. ... PLEASE ... watch those too and let me know your thoughts.

*** chefwriter ... I'm pretty sure I mentioned the dishes a coupla times in the vid. I know I mentioned it when getting the shrimp. ... Thank you too for your commentary.​

CHICAGOLAND.


"We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
 
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Iceman, great video. One other technicality I noticed. Remember as mentors we are trying to show the younger ones about safety, and sanitation. On that note Chef coats should only be worn in the kitchen and nowhere else. If you were wearing it to show the world you're a Chef, I'm sure you have coats specifically for work and some for show.
 
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Well ... My Chef coats are sorted in many categories ...

A.) ... those that FIT.
B.) ... those that FIT and are CLEAN.
C.) ... those that FIT and are DIRTY.
D.) ... those that my wife likes to wear around the house.
2.) ... those that DON'T FIT.
 
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You aren't aware of this? I was taught that in the 70's
No. I honestly never gave it any attention. I don't carry an extra set of clothes with me, I go to work in my uniform and leave in it. If I have to run to the store for work or for after I just wear what I have on.
 
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Okay, I get it.
There was a time, and perhaps it's still done that street clothes were never allowed in the kitchen and that you changed at work.
Didn't want you bringing in any contaminates.
Many places provided your Chef's coats and pants plus one apron.
Many had cleaning companies come pick up the dirty clothes and bring clean ones.
Those days are long gone, unless you might work in corporate.
Many places issue you one or two sets and it's your responsibility to keep them clean.
(this was always impossible after a few weeks.)
 
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Okay, I get it.
There was a time, and perhaps it's still done that street clothes were never allowed in the kitchen and that you changed at work.
Didn't want you bringing in any contaminates.
Many places provided your Chef's coats and pants plus one apron.
Many had cleaning companies come pick up the dirty clothes and bring clean ones.
Those days are long gone, unless you might work in corporate.
Many places issue you one or two sets and it's your responsibility to keep them clean.
(this was always impossible after a few weeks.)
Yeah this is pretty much the case, plus we don't have like an employee locker room so they would have to change in the bathrooms which kind of defeats the whole purpose.
 
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[SIZE=18px]chefross[/SIZE] ... You are absolutely correct on your points. I am usually a personal/private chef. This is how I was working when we made the video. As you pointed out, almost every commercial kitchen that I work in provides coats for everyone in the kitchen. I can't remember any that didn't, but I don't want to be wrong so I said "almost every". As it was, the coat I'm wearing in the vid came from a place I worked that closed. I was at the time the in-house chef for a deli-butcher shoppe. Great job except for the boss's wife. Nobody could stand her, boss included.

brianshaw ... As per category "D" ... My wife does look great in my coats. ... She fills them up/out much differently than I do.




"We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
 
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This thread got me thinking. I'm trying to remember what I wore when I last worked in a kitchen. Back around 1975 or so. I think the restaurant provided me with a white jacket to put over my jeans and T shirt garb. The diners never saw me, well maybe a glimpse when I went out to check on the status of various items on the salad bar, as I recall. So I did look somewhat professional. I know when I was working the employee cafeteria at the downtown Salt Lake Sears store I wore whatever I wanted, no sort of dress code or uniform there.

And as for shopping, yes, I actually spend a few moments hefting onions, for example, to ascertain their relative density, going for the heavier, firmer items. And picking bell peppers based on how easy they look to slice and dice. Odd little things that many shoppers don't care about.

mjb.
 

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