Shell Out, Serving Lobster

595
70
Joined Jun 28, 2010
To serve lobster for a sit-down dinner without all the surgical implements. Crackers, scoops, picks, bibs, finger bowls
[hr][/hr]
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Just knives and forks

dcarch
 
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3,208
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Joined Aug 25, 2009
I don't know where to begin ? .............it's beyond amazing. How long did it take you if I might ask to cut those lines so perfectly ? I did a lobster last week (soup) and cutting the claws was just a pain. Not hard to do, but a pain.

You can come and serve my boss one these any day. He refuses to use a knife for alot of things. (why ?)

At home though, its all the lobster utensils and garlic butter fingers, a bib, a few oyster shooters , an expected shell flying somewhere

across the table, a squirt of juice.....its the joy of biting into the shell and getting that sweet meat between your teeth....does it for me.

The scallions serving as antennae.....great idea.
 
2,753
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Joined Feb 26, 2007
Now how the heck did you do that?

Makes more work for the kitchen, but I bet the customer is happy.
 
595
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Joined Jun 28, 2010
I used a rotary tool with a cutting blade. I wouldn't say it was very easy, but it was not that difficult.

If you want to serve lobsters in the shell for a nice elegant dinner party, that seems to be the only way.

dcarch
 
2,261
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Joined Oct 9, 2008
In Japan, it's very common to do something sort of similar to crab legs. You use a smallish deba knife, a very heavy, stiff, single-beveled Japanese knife used for just about anything seafood that involves bones. And basically you shave a fat strip of shell right off along the leg, exposing the meat to chopsticks. The claws can be shaved or cracked with the same knife. But it would take a heck of a steady hand to do it anything like as neatly as you've done this lobster.
 
1,691
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Joined Dec 23, 2000
Nifty technique but...

When you use a saw, you get sawdust.  Or shell dust, in this case.  How do you dispose of it? I would not think it is very good to eat.

Mike  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/confused.gif
 
595
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Joined Jun 28, 2010
Thanks guys.

First, I never cook lobsters in boiling water. I cook them in 170 degree water. The meat always comes out very juicy and tender.

The cutting of the shell does not create a lot of dust. Just some. A quick rinse takes care of any dust. No flavor is lost because the meat is never damaged and nothing is leak out.

If you are going to try this, make sure you plug your electric tool in a GFP outlet, or use a cordless tool.

dcarch
 
1,691
38
Joined Dec 23, 2000
"...make sure you plug your electric tool in a GFP outlet, or use a cordless tool."

Yeah... God forbid you would electrocute the lobster!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

Mike
 
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595
70
Joined Jun 28, 2010
"...make sure you plug your electric tool in a GFP outlet, or use a cordless tool."

Yeah... God forbid you would electrocute the lobster!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

Mike
LOL!

Shell shock? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

dcarch
 
 
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