Sharpening stone

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15
Joined Nov 22, 2015
Hi, hopefully this is the right category. I just got me self a pair of wusthof classic ikon. Now i'm thinking of getting a sharpening stone so I can give them the love they deserve and serve me for many years to come. However, I'm not sure what to get. I'm looking at wusthofs own stones, trying to figure out if 1000/3000 or 400/2000 is the better one to get. Help please?
 
65
52
Joined Jan 21, 2016
Hi, hopefully this is the right category. I just got me self a pair of wusthof classic ikon. Now i'm thinking of getting a sharpening stone so I can give them the love they deserve and serve me for many years to come. However, I'm not sure what to get. I'm looking at wusthofs own stones, trying to figure out if 1000/3000 or 400/2000 is the better one to get. Help please?
Hi Totte.

I would encourage you to contact your knife manufacturer or do some research on your knife's blade style i.e. what sort of edge it has and its metal makeup.  Some of the more expensive knives are made up of a softer inner core wrapped by a harder outer layer of steel.  The metal composition will determine what sort of sharpening stone should be used.

Having said that, the style of your knife's edge will determine how it is sharpened when using the sharpening stone.  The edge of the knife will also determine the exact angle in which the blade makes contact with the stone when it is being sharpened.  Sharpening the blade at the wrong angle will likely damage your knives or possibly ruin them.  Here is an image of some different knife edges.  As you can see, the edge is going to determine how the stone is used.

 
Using the stone itself is not something just anyone can do right off, especially with quality kitchen knives.  Different knife edges call for different sharpening techniques.  Otherwise, the blade can be damaged, as I have already said.  It takes practice and skill to properly sharpen a quality blade with a wet stone. 

If you are not familiar with sharpening blades with a wet stone, I would highly recommend that you have your knives professionally sharpened at first and practice with the wet stone on lesser quality knives.  

Good luck!

-V 
 
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51
15
Joined Nov 22, 2015
Hi Totte.

I would encourage you to contact your knife manufacturer or do some research on your knife's blade style i.e. what sort of edge it has and its metal makeup.  Some of the more expensive knives are made up of a softer inner core wrapped by a harder outer layer of steel.  The metal composition will determine what sort of sharpening stone should be used.

Having said that, the style of your knife's edge will determine how it is sharpened when using the sharpening stone.  The edge of the knife will also determine the exact angle in which the blade makes contact with the stone when it is being sharpened.  Sharpening the blade at the wrong angle will likely damage your knives or possibly ruin them.  Here is an image of some different knife edges.  As you can see, the edge is going to determine how the stone is used.

 


Using the stone itself is not something just anyone can do right off, especially with quality kitchen knives.  Different knife edges call for different sharpening techniques.  Otherwise, the blade can be damaged, as I have already said.  It takes practice and skill to properly sharpen a quality blade with a wet stone. 

If you are not familiar with sharpening blades with a wet stone, I would highly recommend that you have your knives professionally sharpened at first and practice with the wet stone on lesser quality knives.  

Good luck!

-V 

Thanks for the info. I was actually thinking of practiceing on less expensive knifes first, I got a whole bunch of those who need some love and a few I don't really care if they get completely ruined.
 
65
52
Joined Jan 21, 2016
Here is a great video that I found from Wusthoff about their tristone wet stone and the technique for sharpening a knife. 

I hope this helps.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

Good luck!

-V

 
51
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Joined Nov 22, 2015
Here is a great video that I found from Wusthoff about their tristone wet stone and the technique for sharpening a knife. 

I hope this helps.  :)

Good luck!

-V

Thanks but I've been looking for that one and I can't find a single store who ships it to Sweden... :(
 
51
15
Joined Nov 22, 2015
Here is a great video that I found from Wusthoff about their tristone wet stone and the technique for sharpening a knife. 

I hope this helps.  :)

Good luck!

-V

Can't find a single place which ships to Sweden. I've been trying to find one of these for some time now :-(
 
65
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Joined Jan 21, 2016
Not even Wusthoff in Germany will ship to Sweden?  Sounds like you may have a road trip in your future!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
 
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Joined Jan 21, 2016
Try Maksim at http://www.japanesenaturalstones.com  He has for a long time been a regular and respected contributor to many of the forums I participate in. It's critical to note that I am not affiliated with him in any way. He definitely ships to Sweden, and has all sorts of stones, natural and synthetic, at many price points. 
 
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857
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Joined May 27, 2013
Don't mean to be a contrarian, but I prefer one sweeping motion that covers the whole edge at once, through the length of the stone, instead of the short throw. I also only own a two sided stone. 
 
1,061
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Joined Aug 6, 2015
400 may be too low for your purposes having a new knife. 1000 is a decent starting point.

Can you find Naniwa chosera (professional) stones in Europe?
 
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Joined Jan 25, 2016
I am using diamond sharper as they are easier and less messy to use. One thing which I have notices is they are cheap and reliable. One can easily drop without any problems. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/mullet.gif
 
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Joined Jan 25, 2016
Due to the aggressiveness of diamond may be. As a new user for any sharpening medium, one must have to be careful not to overdo it, not pressing too hard, or the edge can be damaged./img/vbsmilies/smilies/surprised.gif
 
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Joined Nov 22, 2015
Hum, I've been doing some more reading. So many options. Lets say I just want to maintain my blades sharpness and keep them in mint condition. What's the best way to go? Honing rod or wet/sharpening stone? (With practice on less expensive knifes first.)

How does them electric sharpeners work? Any good?

I got a ceramic honing rod from IKEA at the moment, tho I haven't dared using it on my new knifes yet, is there a big chance of ruining the edge? I've managed to make my other knifes sharper at least, so I believe I'm using it correctly.

We also got this service in Sweden called knife letters, you send the knifes in some special letters they send you and you send them back to professional sharpers once or twice a year and they sharpen them and send them back to you. It costs about 13,88£/knife.
 
1,061
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Joined Aug 6, 2015
Stones are the better option if you want this knife to still cut well for you in the long term (after a few months). They are certainly the better option for improving knives' sharpeness. Understand that new knives can be improved upon a good deal with the right tools.

After 2-3 usages of those knife letters you could have purchased a stone. If you are willing to learn and plan to keep your knives for more than 1-2 years, stones are pretty convincingly a better option.
 
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Joined Jan 12, 2013
Ok.  Here goes.

You have purchased some quality knives made from relatively soft stainless steel.  During normal use, the still sharp edge will roll slightly and become wavy or out of true.  In order to keep the blade straight and cutting well, you'll need to 'steel' the knife on a honing rod, and your ceramic rod is fine for that.  A few gentle passes on each side of the knife whenever the knife seems to not be cutting quite as well will straighten everything up and you find that knife will feel sharp again.

 
After a while, you'll notice that you need to go back to the rod more and more frequently, and the results will seem not as good as they were.  This is when you need to sharpen the knife and a stone is best for that.  As long as the knife has no chips, or significant damage (inspect the edge with a loupe) all you'll ever need for that knife is a medium grit stone (800-2k) to sharpen on.  A 400 grit stone will be good for removing chips and fixing damaged blades, but are not necessary unless you need to do this.  Also, being new to sharpening you'll want some practice before taking a very abrasive stone t your knife because you can alter the profile easily and quickly and if you don't know what you're doing cause damage.  Conversely if you polish a softish knife too much (3k+) you'll find you're taking away too much bite from the edge and the blade will slide on tomatoes for example instead of digging in.

For how to sharpening instruction check out Jon's videos on youtube Japanese Knife Imports channel.  

 

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