Sharpening practice knife Tojiro DP Gyuto 240 or Suji 270

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by victorero, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. victorero

    victorero

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    Hello all,

    I got a King 1000/6000 combination stone from amazon but in my first try at the whetstone with my Masakage Kiri I scratched the damascus at the end of the bevel (not too badly but enough that I notice it). Subsequently I realized I don't want to learn from scratch with my babe so I decided to get a cheaper JK to practice my sharpening before giving the Kiri another go. I am in a conundrum as to whether to get a Tojiro DP Gyuto 240 or Suji 270. The Gyuto would be redundant to certain extent with another knife I plan to buy (that's a different thread) and I don't currently have a Suji which would make it a sensible choice. But but but... I just don't know if that's going to be too different since it is so much shorter (as in tall or short not long or short).

    Any opinions on this? 

    Thx
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    It's a tool, just use it. A normal part of proper sharpening is thinning and that WILL require scratching up the side. You didnt need to do it on a new knife of course, but it would happen eventually.

    Might as well learn how to remove scratches and polish now.
     
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  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    The first scratch always hurts the most... whether a knife or a car.
     
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  4. mike9

    mike9

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    A 270mm suji is not a practice blade especially with a VG10 core.  Get a carbon blade to practice on, watch videos - Murray Carter, Jon Broida, etc.  Actually this is the first sharpening video I ever watched and it explained a lot to me.  The others honed my technique so to speak.

     
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  5. victorero

    victorero

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    Maybe my post wasn't clear enough in a couple of point. I am using my Kiri and will keep doing so, just don't want to wreck it learning how to sharpen. I agree, I see myself browsing the forums and youtube to learn how to remove scratches and polish. As for the two knives I mentioned, I do have a use for them, not just sharpening practice. The Suji is something I want, I originally wanted a full carbon Suji but it will probably have to wait as anything over 100 CAD is going to blow my budget this month (hobby/passion budget). The Gyuto would be able to double as my workhorse for a while and once I'm done it I will probably move it to my apartment in Cuba to have something nice to cook with when I go visit the family in the coming couple of years and would even make an incredible gift for my father or my brother (there is no way to get a nice knife there). 
    Sure enough! I haven't experienced the car one but the first scratch in either my Motorbike, my first Le Creuset french oven and my MacbookPro all made me suffer.
    I had my suspicion about the Suji not being a good practice blade. The full carbon is a bit tricky because it would have to be a cheap one (see above) and probably wouldn't double as something I want to leave unattended or gift to someone in Cuba with the insane level of humidity and salt in the air (my and my dad's apartments are both less than 500 m from the sea). However, if you have any suggestions or if you think the Tojiro Gyuto would work by all means share. 

    The video is very much appreciated, I'm already subscribed to Jon's channel but will look at Carter Murray too. Thx for the advice, it's quite helpful and now I'm sure I will wait to get the Suji further down the road.

    Thanks all for the words of wisdom
     
  6. victorero

    victorero

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    I'm now thinking I am going to go with a functional yet more cost effective alternative and just get the Tojiro DP Petty 150 since it comes at less than $40 in amazon and it's something I could even let my wife touch (not that she is overly interested in getting too close to any kitchen-related tool but from time to time she cuts an apple or orange lol). Something else I wanted to mention, my King combination stone came from amazon and after some reading it seems it's a bit small at 18.5 x 6.3 x 2.5 cm. Is that a concern or I can get away with it?

    Thx

    Carlos
     
  7. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    First of all, stop with the whole "practice blade" thing. If you go slow, use a fairly high-grit stone, and think about what you're doing, there is very little damage you can do. Any knife you could really screw up fast is a piece of crap: a masterpiece can always be brought to a genius level. So cool it, stop worrying.

    Your King stone is standard. It doesn't matter. Let it teach you: don't push, don't fight. Go back and forth gently and feel/listen to the stone. Kings have HUGE feedback. Pay attention to it, and let the stone work.

    Grinding stainless is a little more annoying because it fights back, but in the end, you know what? You're rubbing metal on a rock. Don't over-think it.

    Start with sharp and clean. Over time, you'll get more confident and can start agonizing about faces and angles and all that. For now, enjoy listening to your stones.
     
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  8. victorero

    victorero

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    Thx, I'm looking forward to improving my sharpening.
     
  9. foody518

    foody518

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    A little pricier than the Tojiro 240mm, but Kanetsugu Pro-M would work for being a sharpening practice knife that cuts well and can be sent off to family later (a little softer than the Tojiro, has some more toughness, likely to be more thinly ground, fit and finish is fine). http://japanesechefsknife.com/ProMSeries.html#ProM

    Personally I like when I can get 70mm+ width sharpening stones, but I only tend to really struggle with 60mm and under. If you're already using the combo stone fine then don't worry about it.

    I am highly doubtful you'll wreck your Kiri Santoku learning to sharpen. Have to refinish the blade face? Probably. But that's not an impact to the knife's actual usage.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
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