sharpening and patina tips

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by mrbushido, Apr 26, 2014.

  1. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Hello i ordered a tojiro shirogami 210mm gyuto. I got a naniwa 3000grit king 1000 and 6000 grit. Wonder about patina and caring tips? And any sharpening tips? And is this a good sharp knife for a home Cook? Shal i buy a Ceramic Rod and hone it?

    I se bdl is a knife guru here any tips for me?
     
  2. fritz mackrieg

    fritz mackrieg

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    Greetings--

    1) A properly formed patina will prevent further corrosion; a common technique is to apply blood, raw ground meat, or mustard to the blade road for about 20 minutes followed by a rinse and wipe with a microfiber cloth. Keep an eye out for rust in this process.

    2) Sharpening tips: Watch the videos of John from Japanese Knife Imports, on youtube.

    3) That knife will not be "sharp" in my sense of the word until it is. . . sharpened. It's a decent enough entry level knife, of course.

    4) You've no need to hone on a rod if you have a 6,000 grit stone; just touch-up on that stone from time to time, or strop on newsprint.
     
  3. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Ok thank you :)
     
  4. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Gonna try to force a Mustard/vinegar/fermented soy/alcohol/olive Oil patina ;-) my grandfather uses this on his Outdoor carbon blades and he heard this from a Norwegian bladesmith. What do you People think about this?

    He says one at the time rinse then next thing in that order leave each thing for one hour.
     
  5. benuser

    benuser

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    First degrease with alcohol for an even result. I dab with hot vinegar and rinse with very hot water. Whatever you use, remove any agent immediately from the very edge.
     
  6. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Ok Thanks mate. Just hope the knife gets here spon :-D
     
  7. benuser

    benuser

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    You're welcome. A bit less aggressive than hot vinegar: hot, strong coffee. Have fun.
     
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I know nothing about japanese made knives.  But down here in the deep south many homeboys rub their carbon steel blades with a potato and allow the blade to set a couple of days in order for the patina to occur.  I don't have experience with this.  This was just an fyi.
     
  9. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Ok Thanks mates
     
  10. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Can it be harmed by forcing a patina? I want to take best possible care of the knife
     
  11. fritz mackrieg

    fritz mackrieg

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    That's interesting! Good to know.
    Only if you are not vigilant -- keep an eye on the steel and if you notice orange rust forming, rinse and wipe it down immediately. If rust remains, you can always remove it (along with any patina) with a rust eraser or some polishing compound.
     
  12. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Ok Thanks mates :)
     
  13. benuser

    benuser

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    In addition only to Fritz: forcing a patina is a protective measure. Rust is your enemy that can harm and eventually destroy your blade. Rust goes deep into the steel, see pitting.
    The patina is a further oxidation of rust. It stops the process of rust deepening and protects the steel behind with a very thin layer. We provoke rust and transform it rapidly into patina. That's what happens when rinsing with hot water.
    If you use too aggressive an agent and forget it, yes, than you will damage your blade -- a bit. I once put a blade into hot vinegar, immersion, no dabbing. I forgot I had added salt to it and didn't watch the process. Indeed, pitting had started, and the fine 5k edge had altered in one made on a block of concrete.
    So, watch the process, be vigilant, and don't try to do it all at once, but do it by little steps.
     
  14. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Ok Thanks mates :)
     
  15. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Thinking og sanding Down the Black and Thinning it behind the edge to make it less prone to wedging and sticking in say potatoes what do you guys think?
     
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    There was a post about showing off your steel, I couldn't find it with a quick search but perhaps some of you might have it marked.  There was a chef who showed some amazing patterning he put on his Sabs and how he did it using mustard,

    Rick
     
  17. kevpenbanc

    kevpenbanc

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  18. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Cool :)
     
  19. rick alan

    rick alan

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  20. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Awesome lokking :)