Sharpening a serrated knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by aliphares, Jan 24, 2018.

  1. aliphares

    aliphares

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    Long story short, I found a beautiful serrated knife that I want to use but it's as sharp as a spoon. The issue is it's edge is the scalloped type of serration; very shallow waves, not the pointed and deep serrated sort that would be easily sharpened with a rat tail file or ceramic rod in said grooves. I figured I'd ask the more experienced folk over here on how to sharpen such a knife before I miss it up badly. Any ideas?
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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  3. aliphares

    aliphares

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    I live on the other side of the planet :p
    Ebay is not an option for now, and I can't find regular whetstones here let alone these ones, so thanks for the idea but it won't work for me :s
     
  4. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    You might want to consider updating your profile with a location, or be more specific about your limitations so we can better help answer your questions.

    A rat tail file won’t work very well. Ceramic rod - Marne but it might be a very slow and laborious process.

    Don’t you have a hardware or woodworking store wherever you live on the other side of Mars?
     
  5. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Tapered wooden dowels of different sizes + sandpaper. Deburr other side on a stone.

    If the serrations are too small for that, give up
     
  6. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    This is where the Spyderco Sharpmaker is a particularly useful device. Because it's stones are rounded triangles, they can fit fairly fine serrations and still work well with the more broad wavy serrations.
    A bit pricey for only sharpening serrations but it can do a number of other oddball items for sharpening as well as regular sharpening work.
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Where your knife is so dull it might also be worth picking up an inexpensive round diamond hone in the 3/16 inch diameter range for the initial work.
     
  8. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I've used the spider on v shaped stone-on-rod for serrated knives to good success. On the Forschner/Victorinox knives I just use a chainsaw file, as small as I can find. This does a great job, and chainsaw files are cheap and easy to find.
     
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  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    What exactly, of anything mentioned here, is available to you on in the land of OZ? And how important is a bread knife to you anyways? And how about knives in general? JCK can ship to just about anywhere in the world.
     
  10. aliphares

    aliphares

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    First off thank you all for the replies, was swamped yesterday and I only now had the chance to check the forum.
    The spyder isn't available here, sadly. I live in Lebanon, and not the Pennsylvania town. When it comes to knives, people just don't care. Aside from some European overpriced brands (scanpan and such) at boutique kitchen cookware stores, no one seems interested to buy anything better than victorinox. I can find hones and such at hardware stores, so thats my only viable option from the above suggestions. As for me, knives are an obsession. I started cooking as a stress relied and I really got into kitchen knives. All my knives were purchased when I traveled to the US/Europe. Shipping to Lebanon is hell, and a very expensive one at that, too. A fujiwara 270 suji would run you around 200 dollars all things considered from JCK, hence I only buy when I'm tjete, and since I don't have any exchange programs for a while I won't be traveling for a while.
    So that's knives in general, as for this knife specifically, it holds a lot of sentimental value, so yea I'd rather fix it up and use it.
     
  11. rick alan

    rick alan

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    A conventional saw-chain file I would think tricky to use here, better a diamond C-S file will, or a medium and fine tool-makers version from an industrial supply.

    The dowel and wet/dry sandpaper method is good, I should think you can get these things. Maybe start with 180 grit to get things thinned to near the cutting edge then go 360, maybe finish with 600.
     
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