Set of knives or just two good?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by papaolo, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. papaolo

    papaolo

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    First of all, I want to say 'Hi'. My first post here. And second thing is a question cause I'm struggling with decision. 

    I'm not a pro but I like to cook. I'm a musician so I know that proper "instrument" is very important in each mastery. I'm just starting bot I've decided to start with something of good quality but just don't know if I should buy a set of knives or just one good chef's knife.

    I red some reviews of Tojiro knives and Miyabi. Those two I consider if it comes to buying a set. Tojiro DP and Miyabi Isshin (http://www.japaneseknifecompany.com/miyabi-isshin-collection). If just a single one( or two - santoku & gyuto), I would consider buying from this site: https://japana.uk/category/japanese-knives/ and rest of the knifes from local sales in bigger shops. 

    I've read some reviews/opinions of Tojiro DP and they seems to be very good choice for entrance level knives, specially for person that don't cook proffesionally. I didn't found anything in English about Miyabi Isshin serie from the link above. Any clues? And with the third option I'm open for any advice. 

    I live in Glasgow where I've found only one shop with big selection of kitchen knives but none of them are in my price range (around £200)

    Thank you for any help and forgive me mistakes if you'll find any. English is not my primary language. 
     
  2. foody518

    foody518

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    Hi papaolo, welcome to Cheftalk

    I couldn't find much of any detail on the Miyabi Isshin that shop carries

    Tojiro DP is a good value entry level Japanese knife. 

    You can also possibly look at offerings from www.japanesechefsknife.com

    I would recommend getting either a gyuto or a santoku, but not both. You can look at getting a paring/petty knife or a slicer or a bread knife to supplement your main knife purchase, depending on your other prep needs.

    How will you be caring for your knives? Do you require them to be fully stainless?

    How will you be sharpening your knives, and what budget do you have allotted for those tools?
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2017
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  3. papaolo

    papaolo

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    Thank you for answer foody518

    info about isshin serie after google translate:

    MI-3003 Santoku 170 mm
    Blade: VG-2 / SUS-410, 3-layer laminate (mai san), stainless steel
    Hardness: 58-59 HRC, ice-hardened
    Sharpening: manual, convex (hamaguri ha)
    Handle: laminate / veneer impregnated Rosewood (Pakka)
    Product of Sakai City (Osaka), Japan
    I want to start using whetstones for sharpening. I can spend around £100 for them. With holder and flattening stone if it's possible.
    Definitely hand wash and some oil for conservation so I think that fully stainless is not necessary for the blade.
    Hmm so probably santoku and sujihiki. I use Victorinox Fibrox bread knife and I've decided already to buy Tojiro petty 5.7"
     
  4. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I have been cooking professionally for a number of years The longer I do it, the less number of knives I need. These days I use my chef's knife for well over 95% of the time, whether it be peeling a kiwi or filleting a trout. The exceptions are a bread knife (for obvious task) and a 12" hollow edge slicer for breaking down large whole fish (although i can use my chef's knife).


    Ten years ago, Tiger Woods could beat the vast majority of people in the world in a round of golf using only a putter.

    Get a good chef's knife. Master it. The culinary world will unfold in all it's splendor!
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
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  5. jsct

    jsct

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    First of all think of what kind of instrument is the most critical to perfrom the tasks

    you do the most often. Then get the best knife You can afford for this purpose.

    Then think of what you cant perfrom with the knife you have. and story continues...

    Personally I prefer to have lesser tools of higher quality. Bunch of badly designed knives

    with insufficient blade quality cant substitute one well designed blade w good ergonomy handle

    and great edge.
     
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  6. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I'd say that the Isshin, being san mai construction, is most likely VG-10.  The Tojiro is less money and a known quantity, and I doubt Miyabi can compete with them dollarwise.

    Masahiro and Kanetsune are also good entry level knives, and available on ebay.

    This knife intrigues me only in that I have a China-made knife which I believe is their version of AUS-10 and it's edge properties are quite outstanding for such a cheapy.  But it's just a crapshoot, not seriously recomending it.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/SONG-8-Inch...325276?hash=item282c52f21c:g:MJQAAOSwdGFYrVYt
     
  7. jsct

    jsct

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    I would avoid cheap knives with polished finishes as there is a higher probability of overheating the blade and edge. 

    This happens even on many expensive factory knives.. As You are not a pro get the best knife you can for your limit. 

    And most likely you wont need any more expensive knives just some paring and boning knife which can be cheaper factory made. 

    Also when seeing any knife, always try to assess the edge. Try to observe in detail how 

    thin it is and how smooth and compare more blades at once. And realise the overall 

    blade geometry if it is slightly concave, flat and so on then try to think what can pass 

    with less resistance throught whatever you cut. 

    Many times I brought customs to my friends houses to make a dinner together and they 

    showed me relatively dull 50usd good standard factory made knife like it wasnt needed

    we have a good knives :) totally not realising the knives can perform even a lot better than 

    that but while they were looking at those custom blades they were like o yea a knife. 

    Only when I handed it to them they were like wow it slice so.. wow what knife is this ?? :DDD
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2017
  8. papaolo

    papaolo

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    Thank you all for replies. I finally went to shop with some selection of knives to check how Japanese knives works with my hand. They have Miyabi, Shen, Yaxell, Global and few more. I was surprised actually and happy being able to try them all. Chopping board and tomatoes.

    Miyabi are very light, thin blade. But wow, they cut. Big difference for me in weight between santoku (18cm but heavier) and gyuto (20cm). I liked Yaxell Tsuchimon santoku and Gou, both 16.5 but the were bit too short in first impression, 18 would be good i think. But prices...

    and they were much more lighter then i suspected. I'll need to use to it. Unfortunately no Tojiro knives.

    Rick Alan
    I'll check them. Thank you.

    I didn't make a decision yet what to buy, gyuto or santoku. I'll definitely go and try few other marks. Anyway thank you one more time.
     
  9. foody518

    foody518

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    Glad you got to go try some stuff. 

    For what it's worth, cutting tomatoes easily is at least as much about the sharpening as it is about the knife. You don't have to have a knife of the price and level we've been talking about here to easily go through tomatoes. 

    Longer knife helps if you have to occasionally work through larger foods (melons, really large onions or potatoes) or higher quantity at a time (large bunches of greens).

    I don't really know what your stone flattener options are in that area. If possible, it is nice to get one with larger dimensions than the stones you will be needing to flatten. I like coarse diamond plates because they do not themselves deform over time, but they cost more than other flattening options. With a budget of ~100 GPB, I would suggest just folding a damp towel to use as your holder which also raises the stone a little from the countertop. Or you could look into stones that are mounted onto bases (many combo stones have bases)- they do about the same thing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017
  10. jsct

    jsct

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    When it comes to flattening stones I use water resistant sandpapers on a big glass plate.

    It might not be cheaper in long time term but definitely is in short time,

    plus works really fast. All you need at strart is glass plate and various grits good quality sandpapers.

    (for 20 sheets of A4 size you pay no more than 20usd - enough for about 20 flattening operations)

    Also you can be sure that you always have a flat surface.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2017