Sesoning the sides of a thick steak?

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Joined Sep 5, 2008
Am I the only one seasoning the sides of my steaks (and not just the large top and bottom surfaces)? Even if my steak is only 1" thick, I like seasoning (S&P) all sides of the steak. Doesn't matter if it's fish, beef, chicken, etc...: any exposed surface gets seasoning.

The reason I'm asking is I keep seeing chefs on TV showing you how you should always season both the top and bottom surfaces, but no one ever mentions seasoning the sides.

Even a simple pork chop, I like to stand on its side and S&P the whole perimeter, fat, bone, everything. That means when I cut a piece from the outside of the chop I'll get seasoned bits of caramelized meats and/or fat, not bland ones. And when I gnaw away at the bone I'll get all that beautifully crusted seasoning as well.

Wondering how everyone else does it or if anyone else bothers?
 
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
Of course we bother, we're foodies!  I season my chops and steaks all over.  When it comes to chops, I season the bone generally.  I may be imagining this but I believe that the bone gives a lot of flavor to the meat and needs extra seasoning.  Also it makes for a tasty bone which is the best part.
 
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Hmmmmmm bone. Boneless meat is such a sad thing, isn't it? Thanks Kouk' for chiming in. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
 
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Joined Aug 6, 2010
If it's a really thick steak, I'll salt & pepper the edges. Most other things, I just liberally season top and bottom. I've never had complaints of underseasoned proteins.
 
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Joined Sep 5, 2008
So how do you define "really thick"? 2" or more?

I agree that below 1" it's probably not really necessary, but I usually like to do it anyway - seems to taste better to me when eating those side bites. I'm absolutely not surprised that you haven't had complaints of underseasoned proteins. It makes sense that seasoning only two sides of a steak would make for even seasoning, and in fact that's probably the reason why most of those chefs do it. If anything, my method yields a steak that has uneven seasoning, meaning that if a bite from the middle is perfectly seasoned (without sides being seasoned), then the side bites are now overseasoned as they have more salt.

But my concern here is not really in getting an even seasoning, rather in getting a bit more taste out of those "side bites", which I often find the best tasting bits.

It's always fun to hear about others and how they do it, and how they think about it. Thanks for sharing!
 
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