Serving Beef with the first course, Good? Bad?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by nickcim, Apr 13, 2013.

  1. nickcim

    nickcim

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    I am serving a wine paired multi-course dinner for 30 guests.

    I have not put together my entire menu yet and would like some words of advice.

    (Small apple-cinn cracker as Amuse Bouche)

    Would it be exeptable to serve  thinly sliced, seasoned beef tenderloin on a small crisp salad for the first course.

    5 Courses all day, dessert to finish

    (paired W/ Riesling)
     
  2. Iceman

    Iceman

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    Simple answer ... Why not?

    You're the chef.  You're in charge.  It's your job.  Live and die with what you can pull off the best.     I've done a whole bunch of wine-geek affairs.  Generally speaking ... I've never gone wrong serving good meat for any non-dessert course. 
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2013
  3. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It depends on what the rest of the courses are.  Personally I wouldn't serve it if it was followed by short ribs.  Tell us your whole menu.
     
  4. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    It would not be my choice, but I am very set in my ways.  I do my wine progressions from light to heavy, white to red.
     
  5. french fries

    french fries

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    I think it would be acceptable except in a situation like Koukouvagia described: don't serve beef (in any form) as a first course if it's already served as a 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th course. So.... what are those courses?

    On the other hand keep in mind you don't want flavors to go from high to low... so if you serve seasoned beef as a first course, you may not have much room to go up from there.... so maybe think of something a little more subtle for the first course. 
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2013
  6. allanmcpherson

    allanmcpherson

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    Something like a tartar Iworks really well as a first course. If you are thinking of something akin to tataki you can make that work. I will agree with the others that I would not follow beef with beef, however, it sounds like you are allowing yourself multiple courses. In that format you could certainly reintroduce beef latter on. Doing wine pairings makes that even easier.

    If your first beef course is thinly sliced, served cold or body temp and put with say a salad of bitter chicories, you could easily get away with serving even the same cut, seasoned more agressively, and served as a steak, with an intense sauce. Your guests will more than likely be surprised how the same thing is so different. With two completely different wines, the effect would be even more exagerated.

    Al
     
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Beef is fine, but pairing it with a Riesling -- dry or off dry -- is probably less so.  A Riesling could work if the beef's profile is sweet, spicy, or Asian, but otherwise not good.   For your proposed beef amuse/app, consider a Beaujolais Nouveau, perhaps a chilled, fino sherry, or... ?  

    BDL
     
  8. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Good idea.  Great even.