Seeking Leberkase recipe

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by phatch, Jun 1, 2003.

  1. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    As the title says, I'm looking for into on how Leberkase is made, hopefully for the home cook, but even industrial information is appreciated.

    Phil
     
  2. lamington

    lamington

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    Hi Phil. A problem with making Leberkäse at home is that it won't usually come out with the traditional flavour and texture: the meat is ground very finely with an enormous amount of ice so that that the heat caused by grinding doesn't affect the taste and texture before the actual cooking.

    I think i have a recipe in a box somewhere and will go a-hunting...

    --lamington
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I can see that the fineness of grind and evenness of emulsion would be beyond the home cook. I'm still interested in what's in it and how thye do it.

    Phil
     
  4. lamington

    lamington

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    ok, here's the first recipe I've found. It is a traditional Bavarian recipe for Leberkäs. Apologies for the stilted nature of the translation. It's from "Bayerische Küchenschätze", Author: Gisela Allkemper.

    For 15-20 people:

    3 kg lean beef
    500g pig's neck
    250g fatty calf's belly with rind
    1 onion, grated
    80g salt
    8g ground white pepper
    1 tbsp marjoram
    2 crushed garlic cloves
    a little lemon zest
    1.5 litres water
    10g lard

    This recipe is intended for domestic cooking, and doesn't mention using a meat grinder.

    Using a powerful mixer, process small portions of meat with the salt and water until you have a smooth shiny mixture. Combine all the processed portions using a hand mixer, and leave to rest in a cool place for 1-2 days.

    Add the grated onion and other flavourings. Pour the mixture into a greased tin [loaf tin or similar]. Press down firmly and bake at medium heat for 1.5-2 hours.

    ----
    Leberkäs is best eaten freshly baked. You often just buy a hot slice from the butcher, served on a little paper tray with mustard, or in a (rather plain and crusty) round bread roll. It's never eaten cold, in my experience. I have never found Leberkäs that tasted right outside of southern Germany.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Bayern is where I had my first leberkase too. We do have a good German deli here in Salt Lake that serves a tasty leberkase. The Weisswurst isn't up the Muenchen level though.

    I still miss a good Coburger hot of a brazier in the pedestrian zone.

    That's an interesting recipe. Thanks. I'm a bit surprised there's no liver with the name and all.

    Phil
     
  6. lamington

    lamington

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    Leberkäs is one of those dishes that is contrary to its name. The -käs(e) bit refers to the form of the meatloaf (some bavarian cheeses being made in this loaf-shape). The Leber- bit is from Laib(=loaf).

    I think one of the reasons I don't like the main brand in Australia is because it does taste like it has a touch of liver in it.

    --lamington
     
  7. indulgeme

    indulgeme

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    This is a meatloaf type meal, but the original recipe does call for liver as the main ingredient.
     
  8. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    It's hard to make leberkase at home because it's all but impossible without the use of a Stephan cutter. The ice cannot be properly incorporated without one. And, unless you're seriously into charcuterie, that's not likely something you'll own.

    Theoretically, you could do it in small batches in a food processor. But it would be difficult, I believe, to keep everything cold enough.

    There's a recipe and instructions in the about to be released The Art of Charcuterie, written by John Kowalski and the Culinary Institute of America, published by John Wiley & Sons, 2011.

    FWIW, here are the ingredients:

    cure mix:

    2 tsp Insta Cure #1

    3 1/4 oz kosher salt

    3/4 oz dextose

    spice blend:

    1/2 oz ground white pepper

    1/4 oz Colman's dry mustart

    1/2 oz onion powder

    1 tsp ground ginger

    1 1/2 tsp ground mace

    5 lb boneless beef shoulder, cleaned, cut into 1-inch cubes

    4 lb pork jowl fat, cut into 1-inch cubes

    3 lb crushed ice

    5 3/4 oz nonfat dry milk.
     
  9. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    This is a meatloaf type meal, but the original recipe does call for liver as the main ingredient.

    Indulge Me, I'd like to see your documentation on that.

    Leberkase originated in Bavaria, where it contains (despite the name "liver cheese") neither liver nor cheese. Outside of Bavaria, particularly in Austria, they do add liver to the mix. I'll refrain from commenting on which tastes better, but, historically, there is no liver in leberkase.
     
  10. byrdie

    byrdie

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    off topic
    This reminds me of English Horn, which is neither from England nor a horn.
     
  11. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I'm not familiar with English horn, Byrdie. What is it?
     
  12. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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  13. byrdie

    byrdie

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    sorry I just looked at this again...  Haven't had a chance to come here in the last month or so.. 

    but..

    Yes!  that's the one!