Seeking Creative Solutions

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by ritafajita, Apr 8, 2002.

  1. ritafajita

    ritafajita

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    I have a design problem that is fairly unique to the area I am in, but probably quite common in larger urban areas. I would really appreciate any advise those of you who have had to deal with similar situations might be able to offer.

    My location is absolutely ideal in many ways. The rent is fairly inexpensive, and I am right smack in the middle of my target market. However, my restaurant is located on the bottom of a seven story buliding. As far as running a hood ventilation system, well, the roof is pretty far away. I have been using a specialized flat top for most of the cooking, one with a built in ventless hood and fire supression system. This equipment is very expensive to buy, and the ccoking area is quite small. I want to get a fryer and some other equipment requiring ventilation, not to mention that the griddle space is becoming cramped as we grow. I'd rather not have to continue buying equipment with the built in ventless systems. A small fryer like that costs about $10,000!

    How have others with floors above them dealt with the ventilation issue?

    Thanks,
    RF
     
  2. suzanne

    suzanne

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    If you can vent to the outside, can you run a "chimney" up the side of the building to reach above the top? The duct work probably wouldn't cost much, and you might only need a fan to pull the exhaust up and out. Is this a possibliity?

    I've seen some places that only use induction cooking, -- so they don't need any kind of hood (no open flames) -- but that would not work for you, not with a fryer.

    Well, at least you have a lot of business and need to do more cooking!:smiles:
     
  3. chiffonade

    chiffonade

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    How about leading the duct for a hood out a window? Or is there another exhaust that serves another heat producing machine (like a boiler) that you can tap into, to lead your exhaust through?
     
  4. lwunderlich

    lwunderlich

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    In our 14-story condo we have a restaurant kitchen in the basement level--full restaurant facility with the capacity to serve 800 people. Their venting is horizonal and vents to the
    outside wall at ground level. It does not extend beyond the
    outside wall and certainly doesn't extend to the 14th story and it complies with city ordinances. I have no knowledge of the
    type, specifications, cost, etc. as my association is as a condo
    board member and our board had to ok the installation, but it
    does indicate that venting does not have to extend skyward.
    Whatever air handling this entails is very effective and we (board) have had no negative repercussions because of it.
     
  5. ritafajita

    ritafajita

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    Thanks for the suggestions so far. This building does have a boiler system, so I am definitely going to check into that. Further ideas on what I might be able to cook with without needing a hood would be useful as well. I'm not opposed to improvising. With my budget and my location, I have to do it everyday! What about steamers? Do they have to be ventilated? I'm new to the kitchen design stuff. I'm still not quite sure of the rules.
    RF