Secret Recipes

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by sternlight, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. siduri

    siduri

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    Yes! radish and butter sandwiches - i never had had anything like that and seeing the picture made it look SOO good, i've eaten them ever since. 
     
  2. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Oh Man!  Chef PeteMcCracken if you have that book I would love that recipe as well as the, um, oh the pâté of some sort, I can’t remember but it was something like a rustic or country pâté.  I use to make the soup and the pâté along with some fresh bread and my Dad and I would tuck in!!  No one else in family liked it, so more for us!!
     
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Are you referring to "Terrine Maison" (Home-style Pãté)?
     
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    OK kaneohegirlinaz, , are these the recipes you are looking for?

                        
    * Exported from MasterCook *

                              Cream of Asparagus Soup

    Recipe By     :Adapted and formatted by Pete V. McCracken, Personal Chef Services, 657 Village Green St., Porterville, CA 93257 (559) 784-6192, [email protected]
    Serving Size  : 6     Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories    : Soups

      Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    --------  ------------  --------------------------------
      2             pounds  fresh asparagus
      6               cups  chicken stock
      1           teaspoon  salt
      7        tablespoons  butter
      6        tablespoons  flour
      2        tablespoons  finely chopped shallot -- or scallions
      2                     egg yolks
         3/4           cup  heavy cream
      2        tablespoons  soft butter
                            salt
                            white pepper

    With a small sharp knife (not a vegetable peeler), peel each asparagus stalk of its skin and tough outer flesh. Trim butt end about 1/4 inch.

    Cut off tips and reserve for later.

    cut remaining stalks into 1/2 inch lengths, set aside.

    In 3-4 quart saucepan, bring chicken stock and salt to a boil over moderate heat.

    Drop in asparagus tips and boil slowly for 5-8 minutes, or until just tender. Drain the stock into a bowl and set the tips into another

    In the same saucepan, melt five tablespoons of butter over medium heat. Whisk in the six tablespoons of flour and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 1-2 minutes. DO NOT LET ROUX BROWN!

    Remove pan from heat and let cool for a few seconds, then pour in stock, beating constantly with wire whisk to blend the stock and roux.

    Return pan to moderate heat and stir until theis cream soup base comes to a boil, thickens, and is perfectly smooth. Turn heat down and let simmer gently

    Melt remaining two tablespoons of butter in an 8-10 inch enameled or stainless steel skillet. When foam subsides, stir in cut up asparagus stalks and the shallots, and toss them in the butter over moderate heat for 3 minutes.

    Stir sautéed stalks and shallots into the simmering soup base and cook, over low heat, for 15 minutes or until asparagus is tender.

    Purée the soup through a food mill into a mixing bowl and then sieve back into pan.

    With a wire whisk, , blend the egg yolks and cream together in a medium sized mixing bowl. Whisk in 1/2 cup of the puréed soup, 2 tablespoons at a time. Then reverse the process and add the tempered egg yolk and cream mixture into th esoup, whisking continuously.

    Bring to a boil and boil for 30 seconds, stirring constantly.

    Remove pan from heat and stir in the 2 tablespoons of softened butter, 1 tablespoon at a time.

    Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and white pepper.

    Ladle into individual soup bowls or a preheated tureen and garnish with reserved assparagus tips

    Description:
      "Potage Crème d'Asperges"
    Source:
      "Foods of the World, Time-Life Books, New York, Recipes: The Cooking of Provincial France, page 24-25"
                                        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 351 Calories; 29g Fat (74.8% calories from fat); 7g Protein; 15g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 155mg Cholesterol; 2682mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 5 1/2 Fat.

    NOTES : Cooking times may vary for very young asparagus

    Though the recipe does not call for blanching or chilling the asparagus tips, I would.

    Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

                          
    * Exported from MasterCook *

                                 Home-style Páté

    Recipe By     :Adapted and formatted by Pete V. McCracken, Personal Chef Services, 657 Village Green St., Porterville, CA 93257 (559) 784-6192, [email protected]
    Serving Size  : 12    Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories    :

      Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    --------  ------------  --------------------------------
      1              pound  pork fat -- fresh, ground
      1 1/2         pounds  lean pork shoulder -- ground
      1 1/2         pounds  pork liver -- ground
         1/2         pound  lean veal, all cuts -- ground
      5        Tablespoons  BUTTER
         1/3           Cup  finely chopped shallot -- or scallions
         1/2      teaspoon  finely chopped garlic
         1/2         pound  chicken livers
         1/4           cup  cognac
      3        tablespoons  heavy cream
      2          teaspoons  fresh lemon juice
      2        tablespoons  flour
      1                     egg -- lightly beaten
         1/2      teaspoon  allspice -- or Parisienne
      1 1/2    tablespoons  salt
                            Fresh ground black pepper
         1/4         pound  cooked beef tongue -- 1/4" dice, optional, or ham cubes
         1/2         pound  pork fat back -- sliced into 1/8 inch strips or sheets
      1              large  bay leaf

    Combine the ground fat and meats in the mixing bowl of a stand mixer.

    In a heavy 8-10 inch skillet, melt 3 tablespoons of butter over moderate heat. When foam subsides, stir in shallots and garlic and sweat, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes or until soft but not brown. Scrape into bowl cof ground meat.

    In same skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of butter and cook chicken livers for 3-4 minutes or until stiffeneed but are still pink inside. Remove livers with a slotted spoon and set aside on a plate.

    Pour cognac into hot skillet and boil it, stirring and scraping in any browned bits that cling t the bottom or sides of the skillet, until it has reduced to about 2 tablespoons (half). Pour this gaze over the meats and shallots. Set skillet aside.

    Add cream, lemon juice, flour, egg. allspice (or Parisienne), salt, and a generous grinding of black pepper to the meat mixture. Knead vigorously with hands.

    Beat with stand mixer until mixture is fully blended, smooth, and fluffy.

    Lightly fold in tongue or ham cubes, if used.

    Sauté a spoonful of the mixture in the skillet and adjust seasoning.

    Preheat oven to 350° F (175° C)

    Line a deep, rectangular 2-quart mold which has a cover (a terrinie, or a metal or glass baking pan) with thin strips or sheets of prok fat. Strips should overlap and completely cover the bottom and sides of the mold. If they are long enough, let them hang over the sides and later lap them over the top, otherwise, reserve enough strips or sheets to cover the top of the terrine.

    Spoon half the meat mixture into the lined terrine, pressing down firmly and smoothing it with the back of the spoon or a spatula.

    Cut chicken livers into eighths or quarters, depending on their size, and lay them in a row down the center of the mold. Fill mold with the remaining meat mixture.

    Smooth top with a spoon or spatula, and coover with strips from the sides or arrange additional strips to cover top. Lay a bay leaf on the fat, enclose top of mold snugly with foil, then cover tightly.

    Place mold in a large baking pan on the middle shelf of preheated oven. Pour in enough boiling water to reach half way up the side of the mold and bake for 2 hours or until the fat and juices, which will have risen to the top, are clear yellow.

    Remove terrine from oven and lift off cover nd aluminum foil. Loosely cover the mold with fresh foil and weight the terrine by placing a heavy pan, casserole, or cutting board, weighing at least several pounds, on top of it.

    Let cool, weighted, to room temperatyure, then refrigerate with the weight still in place, until thoroughly chilled.

    To serve, remove weight and the foil, and cut slices directly from the mold in which the terrine baked.

    Description:
      "Terrine Maison"
    Source:
      "Foods of the World, Time-Life Books, New York, Recipes: The Cooking of Provincial France, page 14-15"
                                        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 635 Calories; 52g Fat (76.3% calories from fat); 32g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 387mg Cholesterol; 981mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 4 1/2 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 9 Fat.


    Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
     
     
  5. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Oh My Gravy!!  That's it!!  [doing happy dance]

    Thank you so much chefPeteMcCracken!!  I just did a copy and paste to my flash drive.  I had been thinking of this for sometime recently.  So funny that I was reading this thread ...

    My Dad has pasted,so I'll have to eat this by myself, but I'm pretty sure that I can freeze the Terrine Mason as well as the soup!! 
     
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Enjoy!
     
     
  7. indygal

    indygal

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    Wow, both of those look wonderful.  I guess I need to go ferret out my books.  I make asparagus soup all the time, but much more simple.

    I make it with chicken broth, a bit of onion and cook asparagus pieces in there with just a bit of Hungarian paprika and the tiniest pinch of cinnamon (or I've used cumin or chili powder in it too, just not too much)  S&P.

    After the asparagus is done, I take the immersion blender to it and serve it with poached egg, croutons.    I'll have to try this version!  I've even put a dollop of sour cream on it, so I already know I'll like the addition of cream.  

    And while I'm not usually fond of pate, this looks like the exception.   I'll have to try that too.

    .

    Merci !

    Donna
     
  8. chefedb

    chefedb

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    For Summertime, try it cold served in a hollowed out squash, or saucer glass  sprinled with a hint of nutmeg and fresh chopped chive.
     
  9. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Pete, a few things on your asparagus soup;

    Quote Pete; With a small sharp knife (not a vegetable peeler), peel each asparagus stalk of its skin and tough outer flesh. Trim butt end about 1/4 inch.
    - It doesn't mention wether you use white asparagus or green ones. If it's a french recipe, I presume you use white ones. Since you peel them, I would also think you refer to white asparagus since the green ones are used unpeeled in most recipes? I do always use a thin-peeler (vegetable peeler) on asparagus, never seen it done with a knife.


    A good tip; when the asparagus are peeled, heat up your chicken bouillon and put the peels and ends in it to infuse on a low fire. They have so much taste that it's a real improvement in making asparagus soup. Just get the peels out of the bouillon and throw away when you will use it.

    Quote Pete; With a wire whisk, , blend the egg yolks and cream together in a medium sized mixing bowl. Whisk in 1/2 cup of the puréed soup, 2 tablespoons at a time. Then reverse the process and add the tempered egg yolk and cream mixture into th esoup, whisking continuously.
    Bring to a boil and boil for 30 seconds, stirring constantly.


    - Binding a soup like that with a liaison is a very common thing, but, this is the first time I read that someone boils the soup after adding the liaison?? Does that really work, I think it's very very risky!

     

    -- A simpler way to make this asparagus soup is to peel and cut the white (!) asparagus in chunks, add peels and ends to a hot chicken bouillon and let simmer for 20 minutes. Get peels and ends out, you don't need them anymore.

    In a soup pan; sweat a chopped onion, add two small potatoes (approx. 2  small potatoes per 1,5 liter bouillon and 500 gram fresh asparagus), one white celery stalk without leaves. Let fry for a while on low fire. Add asparagus shunks except the tips, let fry for a while without coloring. Add bouillon and cook for 20-30 minutes. Taste for seasoning. Mix or blend finely, do NOT sieve. Add raw asparagustips and let the soup simmer for about another 3 minutes.Add a small dash of fresh cream and if you like some finely chopped curly parcely. Done.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011
  10. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Indeed a nice summer snack! In my country it's even a local speciality from a region near Brussels. They serve radish on a local fresh cheese with a beertype from that region known as "lambiek" or "geuze". I make mine  with "fromage blanc" mixed with p&s, chopped parcely and a few lemon verbena leaves, very finely chopped raw shallot and slices of radish on top. A little fleur de sel on top and that's it. Easy and delicious summerlunch!

    Even looks summery;

    [​IMG]
     
  11. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    ChrisBelgium,

    The recipe is not mine, it is directly from the Time-Life recipe book, written in 1968. Both of your remarks are "spot on" IMHO, however, the OP was requesting the recipes from the source! Hence the "note" concerning cooking times for asparagus.

    That being said, I'm seriously contemplating revising the directions of those recipes to reflect current thinking and knowledge.

    Remember, these recipes were written in 1968 or earlier for use by American housewives, most of whom probably had no idea as to who Julia Childs was nor understood sauté, liaison, and a host of other terms.
     
  12. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    This thread is making me drool!

    Welcome, Sternlight. If you get a chance, stop in the Welcome Forum to introduce yourself. For now I'll just say, Baruch ha-Bah.

    Mezzaluna
     
  13. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Sternlight, we seem to have strayed from your question, sorry.

    I was thinking about this as I feel asleep last night.

    Have you tried to “Google” in the different languages?

    Just a thought…

    My Mother’s cousin went to MIT, he did his undergrad at UH, now he’s a yoga teacher and artist… go figure…

    Chef PeteMcCracken, now this begs the question, can I freeze both the soup and the pate?

    I swear I heard an audible AWK! Come from my husband as I read this thread to him…

    “It’s creamy, I don’t like creamy” as my grandmother use to say, Mais fica, something like more for me!!

    …and isn’t that something… how TV has changed the culinary world and how the average person views it?  I was just reading the latest Reader’s Digest Kindle Version and there is an article about how kids are now in.   I do have to admit, I haven’t bought a cookbook in years!!  Sorry to all of you who write, but with the World Wide Web and that vast waste land called Television…
     
  14. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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  15. indygal

    indygal

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    Chris, you are making me hungry.  I'm going to have to buy some really nice bread to go with my garden radishes!

    I will try your tip about the asparagus peel in the broth.   Anything for more great flavor.  Thanks!

    Donna
     
  16. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Chef PeteMcCracken, when you say I prefer to use something other than a roux to thicken  

    what excatly do you mean?

    I've never frozen a creamed soup before, mostly the broth types,

    well I did recently make a big pot of Split Pea with Ham (ala Martha Stewart, my girl!),

    gave half to my Mom and froze the rest for me

    (AWK, it's creamy I don't like it, oh, that was my husband)

    I hade bought a Honey Baked Ham a while back and still had the bone in the freezer.

    When I was doing my monthly inventor check of the deep freeze, Voila!! I like finding suprises, HA!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
  17. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    I use a modified food starch such as Signature Secrets, UltraSperse, Mochiko, etal.
     
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011
  18. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Mochiko, really that sounds interesting.  You made me think, do I have any?  I guess I missed that on my grocery list, but will do so the next time we go to the "asian market" (love garlic mochiko chicken)
     
  19. siduri

    siduri

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    Julia Child has various thickeners for her cream soups - cream of spinach soup thickened with rice, i believe a cucumber soup (do i remembe rright?) thickened with semolina (cream of wheat), potatoes are always good as thickeners.  there are tons of ways to thicken a cream soup - even just blending most stuff will thicken it. 
     
  20. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I realize I haven't been very helpful to the OP so far. Sorry David! I'll make it up with this recipe I found. They claim it's the original version since forever used in the Sacher café in Vienna. I know who posted this recipe and I trust their claim of originality. If not, I'm only the pianoplayer! I only translated from dutch into english, so all credits to Libelle who posted it. Enjoy!

    Original recipe from the Sacher café in Vienna (in Dutch)

    http://www.libelle.nl/2010/12/sachertorte-recepten-recept-van-de-dag-libelle-magazine-blad/

     

    Sachertorte
    (comment from the webpage; as made since forever by café Sacher in Vienna. The classis sachertorte isn't difficult to make at all.


    Recipe for 12-14 persons

    --Ingredients; 175g chopped dark pure chocolate (70% cacao)/ 150g soft unsalted butter/ 150 g sugar/ 6 large eggs, separated/ 150g flour, sieved/ 175g good apricotjam/ chocolate glaze (see recipe below)/ chocolate holly leaves (see recipe below)/ chocolate hazzlenuts/ a couple of red currant berries or cranberries/

    --Preparation of the Sachertorte; Grease a removable cakemold of 22 cm diameter with butter, clad the bottom with baking paper and grease that as well/ Melt the chocolate in a bowl over a pan with hot water/ Use a mixer at high speed to whisk the butter for around 8 minutes or until fluffy/ Add 100g sugar in several parts at a time while still whisking/ Add eggyolks one at a time/ Lower the speed of the mixer and add the melted chocolate/ Now fold the flour in/ Beat the eggwhites until stiff and add 50g sugar in several parts at a time until peaks appear/ Fold 1/4 part of the eggwhites in the chocolatemixture, then gently add the rest of the eggwhites and fold in/ Put the mixture in the mold and gently spread even/ Bake 25-40 minutes at 180°C: test with pushing in a pin that has to come out cleanly/ Gently cut around the edges and remove the mold/ Let cool for 30 minutes/ Remove the bottom of the mold and the baking paper and let the cake cool entirely/ Heat the jam 1-2 minutes on low fire, sieve and spread abundantly on top and sides of the cake/ Leave the jam to pull in the cake/ Pour the chocolateglaze in the middle of the cake and spread with a paletknife over the whole cake/ Leave the chocolateglaze to harden/ Decorate with chocolate holly leaves, chocolate hazzlenuts and berries/

    --Preparation of the chocolateglaze; Melt 250g chopped dark chocolate in a bowl over a pan with hot water/ Take from the heat and stir in 100g unsalted butter, a little at a time/ Leave to cool at a stage where the chocolate still can be poured/

    --Preparation of the chocolate holly leaves; Paint melted chocolate on one side of holly leaves/ Leave to harden and paint another layer over the first one/ Gently remove the chocolate from the holly leaves/