Searing pork

4,714
945
Joined Aug 21, 2004
Yes you can. What are your reasons for wanting to do it ahead? What makes you question the possibility of doing it ahead? The answers to these questions would help me to offer a better explanation that goes beyond my three word my answer, but I am not sure what direction to proceed in at this point.
 
4,474
421
Joined Jun 27, 2012
Safety wise it is a bad idea.

The meat will have been allowed to sit out before searing then while in the pan the interior heat will climb.

Even if you stick it right back in fridge it will take it quite awhile to cool down (below 40 degrees).

Too long in the danger zone IMO.

mimi
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
Flipflopgirl, I would agree with it possibly being a safety issue if it was a larger cut, but for individual cuts, whole pork tenderloins, and even pork loins, it really wouldn't be a safety issue, if the pork was cooled right after searing.

But as cheflayne stated, to fully answer the question, there needs to be a bit more information.
 
4,714
945
Joined Aug 21, 2004
I can't imagine it be a safety issue even with large items because you have 2 hours to get it down to 70 degrees, then 4 after that to hit the 40 degrees.
 
857
76
Joined May 27, 2013
Since you labeled yourself as a "cook at home" I assume you aren't making 200 pcs.

Are these bone in or boneless chops? Pork generally doesn't take long to cook - not sure how much time you would actually save. Unless you wanted to finish 10-20 pcs in the oven and cook until 150-160 degrees?  Is it a roast?

Yes, more info. 
 
2,498
777
Joined Feb 8, 2009
I'll stick with no because it's no. In this site we s/b telling people that you shouldn't partially cook any meat or seafood to process later. I feel thing like browning pork chop or braising a bork butt or shoulder. When your browning or braising you will be hitting the outside of the meat while sending some of that heat to the center of the meat. Telling the home cook that it's alright without them really knowing what the safe temp point is for cooking food. 
 
Last edited:
2,563
538
Joined Apr 25, 2014
I'm in the no camp.   You save a few minutes at most and IMO refrigerated and reheated proteins seize up. 
 
857
76
Joined May 27, 2013
Not sure about pork, but I've taken hanger steak to rare, with a nice robust sear, cooled, sealed, and refrigerated. Brought to room temp and re-grilled to med rare/ med.

It turned out OK the next day, and we didn't get sick. Tasted great - for steak sammie's, anyway. Did I break the "danger zone" rules?
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
I can't believe all the people in the "no" camp on this one.  Sure it would be better, from a quality standpoint if it could be done all at the same time, but searing the day before really isn't that big of a deal.  I used to work for a catering company, in Chicago.  Everything we did was off-site catering-no dining facilities at our place.  Virtually every event we catered had steaks, chicken, pork, etc., seared the day before and heated up to temperature at the events.  We never had a problem with safety, nor did we ever have any complaints about what we served, and we catered some pretty high-end events.
 
856
33
Joined May 14, 2014
If it's a large braised cut it could be a signigant time saver without cooking the interior at all. In that case I would say yes. Small cuts, chops, or a roast no.
 
3,202
1,071
Joined Jul 13, 2012
I'll reserve till we hear back from the OP.  Everyone makes a good point, but what is the reason for the presear?  I prefer to sear the day of - it just turns into a better product when fresh.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
For those of you saying "no" and using food safety as the reason, then I assume that you wouldn't save the leftover medium rare steak you cooked to eat tomorrow, because it is the same exact thing.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
 
 Pete, Chipotle  Mexican Grill never had a problem, until they did!
This is no way the same and no comparison can really be made.  Chipotle has had outbreaks of 3 major food borne pathogens;

-norovirus - spread from infected employee to customers - cooking kills the virus which would only contaminate the surface of the food, thus searing, cooling and reheating would kill the virus

-salmonella - was spread through raw tomatoes that became infected along the way - not relevant to this discussion

-e. coli - still being determined what the cause was -  e coli is lives on the surface of meats which can get infected through poor butchering practices, it does not live within the meat so that initial sear would kill off the bacteria.  If it wasn't killed then it would be as the meat was reheated - the internal temperature of meat wouldn't even have to hit 165 as the surface would surely reach that long before the internal temperature.  E coli really only poses a significant threat when you eat hamburger (meat is ground so the surface area gets mixed in, but due to the grinding plenty of air is also trapped within the meat allowing the bacteria to continue to thrive), raw meat (Steak Tartar), or raw vegetables contaminated by various ways, usually by run-off from hog or cattle farms or poorly processed manure used as fertilizer.
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I wouldn't do it because the only reason one would do that is to save time and fortunately I can find a 100 other ways to save time for a dinner party when in prepping for one. Searing meat takes such a short amount of time and sticking it in the oven is super easy.

Things that really really take time are prepping salads, chopping veg for mis en place, making dips, polishing silverware, finding napkins, peeling potatoes, eashing and drying herbs, etc. that's where I like to get ahead.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
Koukouvagia, I agree.  99 times out of 100 I see no reason to sear the meat a day ahead as it really isn't much of a time saver, but I can see instances where it might be the best solution.  That being said, the OP doesn't ask if he should, but if he could, and in that case yes he can.
 
2,498
777
Joined Feb 8, 2009
 
This is no way the same and no comparison can really be made.  Chipotle has had outbreaks of 3 major food borne pathogens;

-norovirus - spread from infected employee to customers - cooking kills the virus which would only contaminate the surface of the food, thus searing, cooling and reheating would kill the virus

-salmonella - was spread through raw tomatoes that became infected along the way - not relevant to this discussion

-e. coli - still being determined what the cause was -  e coli is lives on the surface of meats which can get infected through poor butchering practices, it does not live within the meat so that initial sear would kill off the bacteria.  If it wasn't killed then it would be as the meat was reheated - the internal temperature of meat wouldn't even have to hit 165 as the surface would surely reach that long before the internal temperature.  E coli really only poses a significant threat when you eat hamburger (meat is ground so the surface area gets mixed in, but due to the grinding plenty of air is also trapped within the meat allowing the bacteria to continue to thrive), raw meat (Steak Tartar), or raw vegetables contaminated by various ways, usually by run-off from hog or cattle farms or poorly processed manure used as fertilizer.
Pete, What I'm saying is, no one worries until it's time to worry. Look what happens when you have to worry. I have been a caterer for over 30yrs and have never 1/2 cooked any meat item to be used at a later time. It's a bad practice to teach your cooks and a bad practice to teach in a Chefs site. Show me where a food service inspector in any city would agree with your way of cooking and holding food for future use. If you want to do that in your catering business thats fine but, in this site the better answer would be no. Some people may think whats ok for beef would be ok for chicken
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
 
For those of you saying "no" and using food safety as the reason, then I assume that you wouldn't save the leftover medium rare steak you cooked to eat tomorrow, because it is the same exact thing.
I would save it to eat it.  But I wouldn't save it to serve it.  I'm a home cook so my life is in my own hands.  And when I reheat it for my son I cook it all the way through.  
 
Top Bottom