Scrambled eggs - how defined and ordering preferences/terms

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I noticed the recent thread on
What is scrambled eggs really supose to taste like?
and want to see if I can find insights into this simple, but obviously quite varied item.

This is my preference when ordering breakfast, however 9 out of 10 times when I order 'Scrambled eggs, well done' I do NOT get what I want. What usually arrives on my plate is a pile of bits/chunks of scrambled eggs instead of what might better be described as a 'plain omelet'. And the eggs can be anywhere from gooey to browned like country potatoes! Not only are these not what I want to eat, when eggs are prepared and served this way, they cool faster, need to be chased around my plate like peas and lets face it, scrambled eggs are soft enough to cut with one's fork so having them in 'bits' is a bit like serving a child?

It seems that my expectations of what 'scrambled eggs' are and what most (breakfast) chefs assume they are differ. So what I am hoping to find here is how can I order and receive what I want.

My preference is - lightly fluffy and NOT gooey cooked eggs. Call me old fashioned, but isn't the term 'scrambled' referring to the act of mixing/stirring well eggs before cooking? I am aware of 'pan scrambled' where eggs are cracked into a cooking pan and mixed while cooking. I am also aware that if milk is added to stirred/whisked eggs, the results is more creamy, while if water is added the results are more 'dry'. What I've managed to find from a few breakfast chefs that I've talked to is that the current day assumption seems to be to continue stirring the already mixed eggs while they are in the cooking pan. Thus the 'bits' produced.

When I order I usually say 'Scrambled eggs - well'. And even add to waitress, 'PLEASE all in one mass, not bits and pieces.' The eggs still arrive that way - sigh!

OK, feedback?
 
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Yes, this is a problem... and one that I fear cannot be resolved except for cooking for oneself. :)

In my experience the quality of scrambled egg preparation depends a lot upon the kind of restaurant.

For instance, in a high-end French restaurant, like Bouchon, the scrambled eggs tend to be soft in the French style. To me... very yummy and perfect. To others, "uncooked". When asked for "scrambled egg cooked hard" they are harder but not overcooked. Even I would eat them without complaint.

In a diner type restaurant, I expect overcooked clumps. It seems impossible to get anything other. Many cook on a flat-top and are may not be really attending to the egg... but attending to a multiplicity of items so the scrambled egg may not get the individual attention it deserves.

In the class of restaurant between those extremes, there is a bit more of a chance of getting scrambled eggs that are a coherent mass and not hideously overcooked (but I wouldn't call them light and fluffy)... but there also seems a difference between cooked-to-order, cooked from eggs vs powder, and pre-cooked. In those places I try ordering "cooked from shell" to avoid dry egg that may or may not have been held in a steam table. But I never set my expectations very high.

At buffets, I don't eat eggs... ever.

Honestly, if you want a decent egg: Egg sunny side or egg over easy.

p.s. Chasing egg is never necessary if you arm yourself properly: fork in one hand and piece of toast in the other. :)

p.p.s. Stirring the mixed-up egg while cooking is the definition of scrambled egg. Just cooking mixed up egg in a pan is a plain omelet.
 
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p.p.s. Stirring the mixed-up egg while cooking is the definition of scrambled egg. Just cooking mixed up egg in a pan is a plain omelet.

That is what I am concluding as well. The only problem is that most breakfast 'combos' don't have an 'omelet' option. And it baffles me as to WHY one would stir an already mixed-up egg?!?

p.s. Chasing egg is never necessary if you arm yourself properly: fork in one hand and piece of toast in the other.

Alas, I am eating gluten free so toast is not an option for me. And anyway, this doesn't resolve the quick cooling that is a fact with clumps of eggs ;)

I do get your drift that if I am so specific about how I want my eggs cooked, only I am really able to manage that. True, but isn't it delightful to have a 'cook's day off'?!? And why such a things as eggs could be more challenging to cook to order than say a steak is another puzzlement. Over easy or sunny side up?!? You delight is my tummy turn - cooked please!!
 
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You’re not old fashioned you just have your terminology all wrong. I believe you do not like scrambled eggs. Those “bits” are actually called curds and when done properly should be soft and a little wet. Scrambled does not refer to just stirring them before you pour them into the pan. It refers to stirring them in the pan as well, to create the curds. This is not done to cut it into bits and pieces so that it’s easier to eat. It is done to achieve the velvety, soft, creamy, and satisfying texture that many of us love.

You are better off ordering a plain omelette and accept the fact that you do not like scrambled eggs.

This is all fine and good, I think everyone should eat foods in the way they enjoy them. But call it what it is. Omelet.
 
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Most breakfast cooks don't have a clue how to cook scrambled eggs. Most times they come out as one dry mass like Jain mentioned. Even over easy eggs come out with their edges overcooked and rubbery. Everyone seems to think that cooking breakfast is easy to do but it is not and takes the same kind of attention as does cooking an entree on the line.
I used to run an egg station on Sunday brunched for years. I had three stoves going at once. I'd do over easy, scrambled, and omelettes. It takes a knack to get them right and you pretty much are married to the pans for the 4-6 hours during brunch.
The hotness of the pan is very important. You can control a hot pan, but a cool pan will never cook anything right.
 
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You’re not old fashioned you just have your terminology all wrong. I believe you do not like scrambled eggs. Those “bits” are actually called curds and when done properly should be soft and a little wet. Scrambled does not refer to just stirring them before you pour them into the pan. It refers to stirring them in the pan as well, to create the curds. This is not done to cut it into bits and pieces so that it’s easier to eat. It is done to achieve the velvety, soft, creamy, and satisfying texture that many of us love.

You are better off ordering a plain omelette and accept the fact that you do not like scrambled eggs.

This is all fine and good, I think everyone should eat foods in the way they enjoy them. But call it what it is. Omelet.

Thanks for the insight koukouvagia. The reason I thought it might be me using an 'old fashioned' term was that up until some time back (10+ years?) I used to be able to simply ask for 'scrambled eggs' with my breakfast combos and get what I wanted. It seems to me that maybe cooking or preferences for this choice have changed with - "velvety, soft, creamy, and satisfying texture" coming to the fore while lightly made but cooked & not 'creamy' is now a less requested preference?

Knowing the updated term (plain omelet) will help me to order with higher probably of getting what I do want. One question remains, if I do ask for a 'plain omelet' as my scrambled eggs option, will I be sur charged for that? Also, how should I indicate the 'done-ness' I prefer? Medium (cooked but neither 'wet nor dry')? These insights are all lovely for me and I'm sure will result in less not-what-I-wanted returns to the kitchen.
 
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Go watch some YouTube clips about "scrambled eggs". There is only a big whole bunch of different interpretations for all kinds of chef/cooks, including some big names. Good luck getting them any way other than the way the cook du jour is doing it.
 
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I believe it is more requested now because of instagram, youtube, cooking shows etc. All the great chefs are posting videos on how to make the perfect scrambled egg. All my life I hated scrambled eggs, because my mom and restaurants made them crumbly, dry, browned, and overcooked. I didn't even know that fluffy wet curds were an option, I'd never seen that until I ate eggs at a casino buffet in Atlantic City and they were amazing. That's when I started looking into how I could make them like that myself.

You should not get charged for ordering your eggs. You're not ordering a filled omelet with extra ingredients and cheese. I would say "I don't want scrambled eggs, just a plain omelet, fully set, no browning please."
 
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You should not get charged for ordering your eggs. You're not ordering a filled omelet with extra ingredients and cheese. I would say "I don't want scrambled eggs, just a plain omelet, fully set, no browning please."

BINGO!!! Thanks for this and I will give it a go next time I have breakfast out! This is exactly what I hoped to gain from this thread. :)
 
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It’s no guarantee that you’ll be happy with what they bring but at least you’ll make your wishes clear.
 
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I think K hit the nail on the head. But if I may ask, have you ever had proper scrambled eggs? If you've ever had them done correctly I can't imagine you'd ever want to go back to overcooked hard set curds. Of course, in matters of taste there's no room for dispute but a properly done plate of fluffy, just-set eggs is utterly sublime.
 
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My scrambled eggs are big fluffy globs of deliciousness.
Two(2) eggs get cracked into a bowl (1 at a time), yolks broke then schlopped into the ever-important Gatorade bottle. Half a teaspoon water added, never milk or cream or any other dairy product. I then shake the ever-loving bageebies out of them before pouring them into a screaming hot skillet. I turn off the heat, count to 10, then start shaking the pan and pulling the outside to the inside. It's a nice shake not violent, and it's a gentle pull. That half teaspoon of water steams inside the egg mix as it cooks. Steam=Fluffy. They are not runny or undercooked. I season as I plate; S&P.

I saw a Gordon Ramsay vid about Scrambled Egg on Toast w/ sautéed FlatCap Mushrooms and Tomatoes on the Vine. It looked wonderful and tasty, but I've got a feeling that none of my "blue-collar lunch-bucket working-stiffs" would touch it because it looks raw. Sunny-Side Up ... NO big deal, but raw scrambled ... FORGET IT. LOL @ Me I guess.
 
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Here's Jamie cooking scrambled eggs 3 ways. I appreciate both the english and the french style, but I am partial to american scrambled eggs.
 
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That is a very good vid too. His American eggs are smooth and folded. My scrambled eggs look more like the kind at a buffett. Big fluffy yellow globs, but hot and tasty.
 
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My scrambled eggs are big fluffy globs of deliciousness.
Two(2) eggs get cracked into a bowl (1 at a time), yolks broke then schlopped into the ever-important Gatorade bottle. Half a teaspoon water added, never milk or cream or any other dairy product. I then shake the ever-loving bageebies out of them before pouring them into a screaming hot skillet. I turn off the heat, count to 10, then start shaking the pan and pulling the outside to the inside. It's a nice shake not violent, and it's a gentle pull. That half teaspoon of water steams inside the egg mix as it cooks. Steam=Fluffy. They are not runny or undercooked. I season as I plate; S&P.

That's exactly how I do an omelette. ;)
 
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I think K hit the nail on the head. But if I may ask, have you ever had proper scrambled eggs? If you've ever had them done correctly I can't imagine you'd ever want to go back to overcooked hard set curds. Of course, in matters of taste there's no room for dispute but a properly done plate of fluffy, just-set eggs is utterly sublime.

The thing is - I just do NOT like the 'creamy' part! It is a texture that repels me. I do like oatmeal in cookies, fruit crisps and such, but as a cooked cereal, no way. Same with (soft) cooked squash and other foods like that. For me 'creamy' eggs are uncooked and coying - shudder! Its just a personal preference.

But I do enjoy creamy chocolate pudding, potato soup, soft near melting milk chocolate and other 'creamy' foods, but eggs and oatmeal remain hallmark no-way! items for me.

PS. For me cooked eggs do not have to be 'hard', just cooked ;-)
 
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Scrambeld eggs really ought to be soft creamy curds (as koukouvagia koukouvagia mentioned). It does seem that there are a lot of folk who prefer them overcooked until almost solid. In which case it really isn't scrambled egg. Here is how mine looks:

20171020_132820.jpg
 
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Scrambeld eggs really ought to be soft creamy curds (as koukouvagia koukouvagia mentioned). It does seem that there are a lot of folk who prefer them overcooked until almost solid. In which case it really isn't scrambled egg. Here is how mine looks:

View attachment 64173
I had to smile when I saw this picture - to me it looks like a cheese sauce poured over (eggs?) on a piece of toast.

Again, its just my own preferences showing, but isn't it becoming apparent that 'ought/proper/should be' might be a bit presuming on what people may like? Perhaps the long standing terms - 'over easy, medium and well' need either updating OR expanding?!? Just a thought.
 
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There is technique and there are preferences. I know that risotto “should” be al denté but I prefer it to be slightly overcooked. I know that tuna should’ve seared but rare on the inside but I like mine medium well. We shouldn’t apologize for our preferences!

But here is where I draw the line - if I am cooking risotto or tuna or eggs for a party I do them the way they are supposed to be. I don’t know why I think this is important but I do. It has been agreed upon that this is the best technique to showcase the ingredient and i honor that.
 
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I hosted the egg challenge some time back. Might be time to revisit it for the monthly challenge.


morning glory morning glory eggs look similar to mine. My favorite is to add grated parmesan and lots of black pepper right before they are done, stir and plate. When my wife makes scrambled eggs, she'll put them in the pan, go start a load of laundry, stir them a bit, make some phone calls ...

mjb.
 
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