Scotch Eggs

929
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Joined Jul 28, 2006
Scotch eggs are traditionally made with pork sausage.  If I substitute chicken or turkey sausage,  can they still be called Scotch eggs,  or would I need to call it something else? 
 
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10
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Joined May 23, 2010
Turkey sausages! Man that sounds good, we don't get anything interesting here in New Zealand. Our meat is pretty decent quality but things like turkey only happen at Christmas time and even then it's not cheap.
 
229
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Joined May 22, 2010
Normally, I'm not a fan of changing the names of traditional foods. But if you're not putting it on a menu for sale to paying customers, then who cares? Call 'em whatever you want!
 
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929
18
Joined Jul 28, 2006
No, this is just for some variety at home.  I happened across the recipe for Scotch eggs,  and thought the turkey or chicken sausage would be a nice change.  Shall we just call it a variation of the traditional? 

For those who don't know, Scotch eggs is made in this manner:   To serve 6:

Divide 1 pound sausage into 6 equal portions.  Form each portion of sausage around a hard cooked egg (smaller eggs work best for this).  Dip each "ball" into beaten egg, then plain dry breadcrumbs,  and deep-fry until the sausage is done and the ball is browned.  Or, after breading,  bake in the oven until brown and done.   These can be served for breakfast or for snacks.  Some like them cold or room temp.  Scotch eggs on a stick can be found at some fairs. 
 
2,753
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Joined Feb 26, 2007
Grace - I've been meaning to try them out myself.  Personally if you weren;t to use pork mince - I'd go with chicken mince. No reason to change the name as far as I can see.

Enough fat in it to mimic pork so it should hold together better than turkey mince which can be fairly lean, unless you want to add some diced bacon fat into the mix.  Chiken is still the winner in my mind.

Let us know what you do... would be interesting to know :)
 
3,147
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Joined Jan 5, 2007
I  make Scotch eggs a lot in summer.  The pork sausagemeat works well because of its fat content - whilst the turkey/chicken mince may make the covering a little dry in texture.

I always add some sage to the sausagemeat before wrapping the eggs.  I also use quail eggs to make cocktail-sized scotch eggs.

I don't think worrying about the name is important - but in case you have the equivalent of a British Trades Description Act and are scared of being taken to court - then why not call them Picnic Eggs?!
 
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
been meaning to ask, don't the yolks get overcooked and do that sulfur smell/taste?
 
929
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Joined Jul 28, 2006
I'll let you know how they turn out when I make them for the first time.  This apparently is a very popular dish in some parts of the world,  so maybe there's some trick to making them...perhaps undercooking the eggs initially,  or maybe in the timing of getting the meat cooked through, without over-heating the centers of the eggs? 
 
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3,147
41
Joined Jan 5, 2007
The eggs are usually hardboiled.  I have never noticed any sulphur smell, but maybe that dissipates after the meatcoating is fried and they are then chilled.

Scotch eggs are sold as a snack item here in most supermarkets - eaten with a salad for a light lunch or ideal picnic food. 
 
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