Scones

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by chrisbristol, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Hello

    I'm really trying to make a great scone. This is the recipe I use.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/paul_hollywoods_scones_70005

    Unlike a lot of scone recipes this one uses bread flour.

    Now I want to try to boost the flavour a bit. So I was thinking of creaming the sugar and butter first then add the other ingredients then adding the flour last to avoid over mixing. 

    Will this work?
     
  2. fablesable

    fablesable

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    Nope. No creaming as this will change the entire texture from a biscuit to a cupcake. Boosting flavour is not done through change of method bit through ingredients used.

     What sort of favour would you like to have and what are you serving the scones with??

    Savoury or sweet?
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2016
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    If you want to boost flvour, rember this fact:

    Fats absorb flavours.

    You can cube your butter, toss it in a bowl with aromatics, cling film it up, and pop it in the fridge for a few days. Result? Butter that tastes strongly of whatever you put in with it. Same with eggs.

    All kinds of things you can toss in the dough, savoury? Fresh herbs, spices,
     
  4. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    I did try it. The flavour was nicer but the texture wasnt great. I just want to lift it a bit. More tasty perhaps a bit sweeter.
    Out of interest why is you mix flour and butter in some recipes and cream butter and sugar in others?
     
  5. fablesable

    fablesable

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    Check this article out to help you figure out appropriate uses for mixing methods: http://www.craftybaking.com/howto/mixing-method-basics

    So what do you mean by "lift it a bit"? Can you describe what it is that you are looking for with greater detail?

    "I just want to lift it a bit. More tasty perhaps a bit sweeter."

    Again, when you are saying "texture" yet using description words for flavour.....you are leaving us confused. ;)
     
  6. chefajax

    chefajax

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    Agree with Fablesable..... A Scone is a not sweet pastry.Texture is more like a biscuit than a Muffin. I like to incorporate items like Dates and Nuts or Cranberry and Orange Zest. We supplied our customer with the sweeter accompaniments like Lemon Curd or Devon shire Cream as I was taught by me Mum. You might be going too "American" (No Insult) which has a bigger sweet tooth than in most of the Scone eating World.
     
  7. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Hello

    Thanks for the replies. 

    When I said l lift I meant just boost the flavour so you could eat it alone. Don't get me wrong I would always add jam  but I have had scones before that have been so nice I could eat them without it. That is what i am aiming for.

    I am making some tomorrow and I have taken some of the advice on board pirticualrly Foodpumps. I like to add vanilla essence to it which I normally add to the milk and warm through which is an idea I got from another recipe. However this time I have mixed it with he butter and and am leaving it overnight.

    While I'm on the subject of butter I normally use salted butter even for sweet cakes but is unsalted better?
     
  8. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Well I just made my scones. Taste wise I was quite happy. Texture wise not so happy. They had a kind of sticky texture. Most likely caused by the bread flour. I can't really see how I could have worked it less than I did. I did let the dough relax after making it for about 40 minutes and then 20 when I had cut the scones before I put them on the oven. I let them rest in the fridge. Would it have been better to let them rest at room temperature as you normally do that with bread flour dough's
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2016
  9. panini

    panini

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    @ChrisBristol  ,

    This is just my personal preference. I prefer a wet to dry. Over the decades I'm probably over the million + mark. 

    I small cube chilled unsalted butter butter. Paddle my dry ingredients. Add my cubed butter and paddle until small pebbles are achieved.

    I don't use milk, I use heavy cream.

    I add the cream just to incorporate it. Flip in on high, just to bring it together. Basically no mixing like biscuit, Turn it out on a board and add our garnishes.

    roll or pat and cut.

    Retard. Brush with melted butter and bake.

    We chop all left over white chocolate from shaving blocks, etc. add fresh raspberries to half pat and turn over. 2 times. These account for maybe 60% of our scone sales.

    ps, I use a good high gluten bread flour to help with the lack of mixing.
     
  10. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Maybe it's just me, but I would never use bread flour in a scone. Ever.
     
  11. chefajax

    chefajax

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    Second Chefpeon's statement. I used AP Flour and Buttermilk in my scones.
     
  12. panini

    panini

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    I completely understand the thoughts on using a hard flour. From the posts I get the feeling this is a mistake or unprofessional.

    Like I stated, this is my personal preference. I think being open minded and curious is what lead me to this basically no mix formula.

    The last 20 seconds of paddling on high speed is just enough to bring out a little gluten. My formula would

    crumble with a softer flour. It my be uncommon, but in the last two decades, selling thousands and thousands with two awards can't be that wrong.

    I came back because I thought I would just throw up my formula for anyone who might be open minded or curious.

    12 lbs. Hard flour

    2  lbs. sugar

    3 oz.  Salt

    10 oz.  Baking Powder

    6 lbs.  Small Cubed Chilled Unsalted Butter

    1 cup Fresh Lemon Rind

    Mix with paddle until butter is pea size

    Add 4 lbs. Whole Eggs Quickly, but not to splash. Middle Speed

    Add 3 Qts. Heavy Cream Quickly, but not to splash. Middle Speed

    When the liquid is gone, stop the mixer.

    Paddle on High Speed for maybe 20 seconds.

    On to lightly floured board to add taste ingredients.

    I'm sure you all know how to manipulate a dough so it comes out more flaky than crumbly.

    To keep from getting a dry product, we use floured hands with a somewhat sticky dough.

    Cut, retard.

    Who knows, they may even come out appealing. Even with hard flour :>)
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2016
  13. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Hey, I'll try anything once. For that matter, I've never added eggs to scones either, so it'll be a two for one.
     
  14. panini

    panini

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    I don't know @chefpeon  , I wouldn't risk it and jump right out of the box now. I mean, you've only been kickin around here at ChefTalk for a decade or so.

    I think I remember you ventured back to the real world, so if you need help scaling down just let me know. >)
     
  15. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Meh, I've seen a lot in regards to scones.  One place I worked at would whip liters and liters of cream to fold into the dough.  My favorite method is to mix just to  a shaggy mass, pop it in the fridge, then give a single tour and 3 doubles over an afternoon   a'la "Blitz puff pastry". 

    I HATE the taste of baking soda/pwdr on my tongue, one of the reasons I will never buy scones, quick breads, or pancakes  from anyplace I haven't tried out before.......
     
  16. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    One thing worth mentioning is I don't have a paddle so I use a food processor but go very careful not to overmix. I'm actually thimking of going back to my original recipe with self raising flour and try to get that one as good as I can.
     
  17. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    @panini  Your formula is in weight (yay!), so scaling down will be a cinch! I haven't forgotten that much........yet.
     
  18. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Euro standard is 2% salt by weight. Don't know if there's a n. Ameican standard.