scones bitter taste

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by pastrycake, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. pastrycake

    pastrycake

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    I made some blueberry scones but my friend says there was a bitter after taste? could it be the flour or baking powder? I used a new bag of pillsbury sealable flour (2 cups) and 1 tbsp of baking powder...any tips?
     
  2. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I don't use 'cup' measurements - perhaps it's the amount of baking powder?
     
  3. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Max ratio of baking powder to flour is 1 or 1-1/4 tsp per cup, so you did use too much baking powder. It's very possible that was the problem.

    BDL
     
  4. pastrycake

    pastrycake

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    I just followed the recipe which says 1 tbsp, how should I adjust it down without compromising the leavening needed for scones...2 tsp?
     
  5. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Each persons taste buds are unique, and have their own unique sensitivities.

    Baking powder is one of the things which becomes unpleasant for most people once there's enough of it to makes its presence known through the taste buds. One component of double acting baking powder is a "dry acid," while another is a type of heat activated acid called a pyro-phosphate. In sufficient quantities, erreither and/or both can trigger the "bitter" buds. That's usually not a good thing in a blueberry muffin.

    While 1 tbs of baking powder per 2 cups of flour might not be too much for some people, it is for many other. It seems likely your friend is among the second group, while you're not.

    As I wrote eariler, the common maximum ratio of baking powder to flour is 1-1/4 tsp to 1 cup for quick-rise baked goods; and 1 tsp to 1 cup is probably more common. I suggest reducing the amount of baking powder from 1 tbs to 2 tsp on your next run -- if for no other reason than to eliminate a superabundance of baking powder as the cause of dissatisfaction. Chances are good 2 tsp will give you the same amount of rise that 1 tbs did. However, if you get good taste but not enough loft, you can try 2-1/2 tsps of baking powder on the following batch.

    It's worth memorizing both the maximum and optimum ratios. If I can remember 1 to 1-1/4 tsp per cup, so can you.

    BDL
     
  6. got2cook

    got2cook

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    some baking powers contain aluminum (sodium aluminum sulfate) in higher amounts this can cause a bitter after taste.
     
  7. got2cook

    got2cook

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    make you're own baking powder. 1 part baking soda, 2 parts cream of tartar, 1 part corn starch, it works.
     
  8. mtullius

    mtullius

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    I've made baking powder when I was out. But it is not double acting like store bought. This means it (homemade) is activated by moisture (1st action) but not by heat (2nd action.) So it must be baked right away. If you wait too long to bake your food or mix it too long the air bubbles created that privide leavening will escape
     
  9. fablesable

    fablesable

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    Besides all the above information about BS and BP I would also like to point out that the flour that you were using probably has barley flour in it as that is the go to filler nowadays. It tends to go bad quite often and lends towards a rancid smell in the flour and a bitter almost chemical like taste when baked.

    Also @boar_d_laze  is correct on the amount of BP you used.....waaay too much as I would have only used 2 tsp MAX in a recipe with 2 cups of flour.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    In America malted barley in small amounts is added to flour as an enzyme and not a filler. 
     
  11. fablesable

    fablesable

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    @kokopuffs  Thank you for correcting that /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif

     It is correct that it is an added enzyme, however I wanted to point out (although incorrectly by saying 'filler') that the malted barley addition goes bad fairly quickly while sitting on the shelves that a lot of people are not aware of. Also, I do not recommend the addition of barley malt flour for baked goods unless you are fermenting : like bread products, as they can add up to 25% malted barley into the commercial flour blends on the store shelves these days. Barley tends to lend towards a negative flavour profile in cakes, cookies, biscuits, etc IMHO. 
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2015
  12. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif

    Even with the flours I use for bread that have malted barley added to them, I add approx. 1 heaping tsp per 1  kg flour give or take.  No need for microscopy.

    And be advised that boutique mills in America like Weisenberger Mills and Rocky Mountain Milling do not add malted barley to their product.
     
  13. fablesable

    fablesable

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    Yep, its all a matter of individual taste preferences. My mom would love your baking as she is a fan of malted barley in her baked goods. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    I use my local farmer that grows and produces their own flour brands. They will work with anyone to make the blend of flours you need.....it's wonderful! I use a lot of Park Wheat Flour, Black Einkorn  Flour, and Soft White Wheat Flour. 
     
  14. luc_h

    luc_h

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    @pastrycake,

    I suspect something else could be at play here since there is 3tsp in 1 tbsp so, you're not way off the mark on BP to flour ratios 1 1/4tsp  to 1 cup which would be 2 1/2tsp vs your 3tsp (1tbsp) in 2 cups.

    Did you sift your ingredients? a baking powder lump will taste bad.

    did you use the typical ingredients? white AP flour, sugar, butter, egg and baking powder (and blueberries)

    For example, whole wheat flour can become rancid and give a bitter taste.

    even burnt bottoms can taste bitter.

    Not enough sugar can make flour taste bitter as well.

    or like it was already mentioned, some people don't think scones are sweet enough and taste bitter.

    Can you share your recipe?

    Luc H.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2015