Scalloped Potatoes

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Hello I just started doing some side catering I want to do scalloped potatoes and I wanted to see if anyone would be willing to share what brand they may use to do there scalloped potatoes. I am looking at about 30 people. I have seen some brands and I am just wanting to know if anyone has used brands like Simplots.

Also would like to know if scalloped potatoes hold well in a Cambro?
I'm looking forward to hearing from you all
 
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brianshaw brianshaw to be fair the packaged products if treated well end up being as good to the guests.. If you mandolin potatoes you have to have them perfectly cooked.. then.. sauce.. then hold..

:)
 
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Brian is saying you should make this product. And you can.. I don't think anyone will know the difference.
You need to figure out what you can hold and what you can't.. I don't think anyone here can give you an answer. It's very dependent on the way you cook the dish.. are you finishing it and then taking it there.. or taking it there and finishing on site?
 
23
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Joined May 31, 2017
brianshaw brianshaw to be fair the packaged products if treated well end up being as good to the guests.. If you mandolin potatoes you have to have them perfectly cooked.. then.. sauce.. then hold..

:)
Eastshore,
thank you for taking the time to reply, I work for a global corporation and I have been to many parties and had pretty good scalloped potatoes and I am pretty sure they were out of the box. and the people at the party seemed to like them granted there were other foods to choose from. I was looking at a food distribution site I belong to and I ran across these scalloped potatoes and I was like hey I wonder if this would be something I could do. I would think that if they are on the site someone have used them and I was just looking to get feed back if anyone has used this and if so why brand and what they thought. I do appreciate your feed back.
 
23
10
Joined May 31, 2017
brianshaw brianshaw to be fair the packaged products if treated well end up being as good to the guests.. If you mandolin potatoes you have to have them perfectly cooked.. then.. sauce.. then hold..

:)
Eastshore,
thank you for taking the time to reply, I work for a global corporation and I have been to many parties and had pretty good scalloped potatoes and I am pretty sure they were out of the box. and the people at the party seemed to like them granted there were other foods to choose from. I was looking at a food distribution site I belong to and I ran across these scalloped potatoes and I was like hey I wonder if this would be something I could do. I would think that if they are on the site someone have used them and I was just looking to get feed back if anyone has used this and if so why brand and what they thought. I do appreciate your feed back.
Mimi,
thanks for the link.
 
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Not stalking you lol.
Mainly posted as an FYI to the thread.
There are so many varieties of potatoes out there with each having pros and cons re application.
Like having the right tool for the job.

mimi
 
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Joined May 31, 2017
Not stalking you lol.
Mainly posted as an FYI to the thread.
There are so many varieties of potatoes out there with each having pros and cons re application.
Like having the right tool for the job.

mimi
HA HA... if you are stalking me I am fine with that better you then some others. I appreciate any and all suggestions, thoughts, and opinions. I am a beginner when it comes to catering I am looking to grow my business a little more to reach my long term goal.
 

pete

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There are decent products out there, I'm sure, but I have not used them. I get where you and Eastshores are coming from, but scalloped potatoes are so easy to make, and while the bought products are "fine" I am sure you can make better yourself. I used to make hotel pan after hotel of them. We used the slicer attachment to Hobart mixer (floor model). I throw a few layers of potatoes into a hotel pan (didn't bother placing them nicely), seasoned them and sprinkled with a good amount of cheese. Potatoes need to go right into the hotel pan. Do not rinse or store in water as you want as much surface starch as possible. Continue this layering until the hotel pan (2 inch) was full, then poured in hot cream (heated with cloves of garlic) to just barely cover. Cover in foil and bake for 1 or 1 1/2 hours (sorry it was long ago and I don't remember the exact timing). Remove the foil and bake until cheese on top browned. When they first come out of the oven they are still somewhat soupy but as they cooled and set the liquid got thicker. We either used them right way, in a buffet setting (after they had set awhile) or we cooled them down completely. At that point we would cut them and reheat to order as a side for a steak. After cooling completely they would hold their shape even after reheating.
 
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Joined May 31, 2017
There are decent products out there, I'm sure, but I have not used them. I get where you and Eastshores are coming from, but scalloped potatoes are so easy to make, and while the bought products are "fine" I am sure you can make better yourself. I used to make hotel pan after hotel of them. We used the slicer attachment to Hobart mixer (floor model). I throw a few layers of potatoes into a hotel pan (didn't bother placing them nicely), seasoned them and sprinkled with a good amount of cheese. Potatoes need to go right into the hotel pan. Do not rinse or store in water as you want as much surface starch as possible. Continue this layering until the hotel pan (2 inch) was full, then poured in hot cream (heated with cloves of garlic) to just barely cover. Cover in foil and bake for 1 or 1 1/2 hours (sorry it was long ago and I don't remember the exact timing). Remove the foil and bake until cheese on top browned. When they first come out of the oven they are still somewhat soupy but as they cooled and set the liquid got thicker. We either used them right way, in a buffet setting (after they had set awhile) or we cooled them down completely. At that point we would cut them and reheat to order as a side for a steak. After cooling completely they would hold their shape even after reheating.
Thank you Pete,
I appreciate your thoughts, input, and the guide you presented in a nice manner. I am just really trying to get feed back this is a side venture that I started b/c I love to cook and enjoy people. I am just starting out and wanting to gain experience, knowledge from those of you who have been in the industry. I also, have to be realistic at this point that where I live which is rural Pennsylvania I think I have to take into consideration what I am up against with that as well. I look forward to hearing from you again.
 

pete

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If I were in your shoes I would definitely do as much "from scratch" cooking as possible and make sure that you let people know. Sure, you could use bought product, and, knowing the palates of most people in rural areas (I live in rural Wisconsin) you could probably get away with it without any problems, and even plenty of compliments. But, as long as you can keep your costs down, making it from scratch will give you a reputation for doing things right and it is that reputation that is going to get you more business, not your scalloped potatoes.
 
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From scratch also helps to keep costs down because you aren't paying someone else to prep the product for you before you purchase it.

I was purveyor sales agent worst nightmare, they would try to get me to buy their cheesecake. I would just look at them and say, I can do it for 1/4 of the price you want for your product, and I wind up with a better end result dish. So tell me again why I want to buy it?
 
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brianshaw brianshaw to be fair the packaged products if treated well end up being as good to the guests.. If you mandolin potatoes you have to have them perfectly cooked.. then.. sauce.. then hold..

:)
No doubt. :)

But... What Pete said (minus the cheese... that's another potato dish).
 
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Have to offset labor costs versus make it from a box and have a mediocre product that is okay but not outstanding. But I cheat and buy Betty Crocker then doctor it with onion, garlic, and extra sharp white cheddar...
 
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For a side 30 people aren't that many. Why not put yourself on the map so to speak. You will need a mandolin for this one though.

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017724-cheesy-hasselback-potato-gratin

30COOKBOOK1-mediumThreeByTwo252-v2.jpg
 
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What do you see as obstacles or stumbling blocks in your locale?
where I am at I am in South Central PA where most are not looking to pay the prices that one would that is closer to places like Pittsburgh or Philly. This is a small rural area. There are some caters who do the very large events, since it is just me I am looking at doing small events/parties such as 30-50ppl. thus far I have done everything from scratch from my mac and Cheese, to soups I have done for parties. I am looking at adding to my menu but want things that can hold in a Cambro and not look like a mess when I put it out. Not sure if that makes sense.
Have to offset labor costs versus make it from a box and have a mediocre product that is okay but not outstanding. But I cheat and buy Betty Crocker then doctor it with onion, garlic, and extra sharp white cheddar...
MaryB
Thank you for the reply I am just wanting to find out what others do, the catering is a side business right now I have a full time job and I have to figure out what will be effective for me. I think I am a little surprised that No one uses the dehydrated scalloped potatoes. I just figured most people did as I see them in my food distribution catalog. I am very thankful for everyone's feed back. Do you cater or when you do the Betty Crocker is that for just family gathering?
 
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