Savory pie help.. British chefs?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by newbie12, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. newbie12

    newbie12

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    So I want to open a British style and pea shop, my question is while I can make great pies pastry and all at home the baking time from start to finish of a completed pie is just too long.

    What do they do in the pie shops to speed up the ticket time?

    I know keeping pies in a warming cabinet is an option, but I want the crust to be crisp and flaky and not dried out.

    Is there any tips people wouldn’t mind sharing?

    Thank you.
     
  2. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    Do you have any industry experience?
     
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  3. newbie12

    newbie12

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    Yes.
     
  4. richjonesy

    richjonesy

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    One thing we did in a pub I worked once was to individually blind bake a ton of shortcrust pie cases then these had like a week shelf life on them. Then in service we’d heat the filling and drop it in, place a puff pastry lid on it, eggwash and cook it for about 15 mins. Looked pretty good to be fair I’ll see if I can dig out an old photo of one of the thousands that we served.
     
  5. someday

    someday

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    I'm not British so I'm not allowed to help you, sorry.
     
  6. richjonesy

    richjonesy

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    No ones asked for a British chef or opinion.
     
  7. newbie12

    newbie12

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    I didn’t specifically ask for British chefs only. I asked if there were any as they may have had experience in or knowledge on traditional pie shops.
     
  8. newbie12

    newbie12

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    Thanks for that, I will give it a go. Would love to see a photo if you found one.
     
  9. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    What's the size of staff dedicated to producing pies?
     
  10. someday

    someday

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    The op did in title, yes.

    I was just joking anyways. Just thought it was funny to put that in your title.
     
  11. r.shackleford

    r.shackleford

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    Depending on what pies you want to offer, if you are going with the basic "meat" pie you should use a quality short crust pastry, make sure that the pies are not too big that they don't bake through (you wouldn't want to suffer the wrath of Mary Berry for serving soggy bottoms)
    If you want to get creative and offer Melton Mowberry's you need to learn how to make a hot water pastry, this is similar to choux but without the eggs and the formed around the outside of a mold while still hot, allowed to cool then the mold is removed and a spiced pork filling is added, almost like a coarse pate then baked and finished with aspic....... I'm making myself drool.
    The best piece of advice i can offer is go to the U.K. and do some hands on research, it's not just being able to make a decent pie, what are you going to offer for condiments? have you mastered your Picalilly? what about jellied eels or mushy peas, so many culinary delights to offer.
    Last question, is there enough of an ex pat community to support your venture?