saving egg

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by cooki, Apr 8, 2006.

  1. cooki

    cooki

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    when i bake something, there are a lot of times when i only use the egg yolk or the egg white. then, can i save the part i didn't use and use for something else later? (not on the same day)? do i just put it in a bowl and wrap with plastic wrap and stick in the refrigerator?
     
  2. crazytatt

    crazytatt

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    I've had no problems reserving the unused portion of eggs. I've freezed whites with mixed results, not sure about yolks.
    As far as wraping and refridgerating, you are good to go, just don't let it sitt for too long.
     
  3. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Cooki, you can certainly use the other part of the egg in a day or two if you keep it tightly wrapped and in the fridge. Otherwise it's time to find a recipe that uses eggs or yolks so they don't sit around longer than that.
     
  4. kelleybean

    kelleybean

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    Hi cooki,

    I'm not exactly sure what cooking show I heard this on but they said that if you want to save egg whites you simply put them in an airtight container and add 1 tsp of salt per egg white. They will be good in the freezer for up to one month. I have never done this so I can't tell you for sure how well this works.

    HTH,
    Kelley:bounce:
     
  5. kaylinda

    kaylinda

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    Yes...you can freeze eggs. They worked well for scrambled...but I haven't used them that way for baking. I see no reason they wouldn't be ok though. What I read said to mix them up a little first...add a teaspoon of salt and throw them in a baggy and freeze.
     
  6. aprilb

    aprilb

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    Using CO2 (dry ice).

    I believe that the yolk in the whole egg will break due to expansion (It's got a fairly thick membrane...haven't tried it but it's an interesting idea for an experiment) but that you can separate the components and freeze separately or scramble thoroughly and freeze.

    You'd also want to freeze as rapidly as possible. I'm guessing that it would cause an unpleasant breakdown of protein and crystalization if it's frozen slowly. The general technique is to place a large amount of dry ice in a cooler with the prepared/wrapped eggs. I've heard of using a sanitized ice cube tray for portions. It's dangerous so make sure you read and understand all of the safety handling proceedures about it. It will give any thing it touches frostbite in a heartbeat. So use extreme temp gloves.

    So you'd seal the eggs in the containers of choice (not too many per each which is why I like the ice cube tray method. lots of surface area for a small portion of egg) place in bottom of cooler with dry ice, seal the cooler and let the CO2 do it's work. I don't know how long it would take, but then when it's frozen solid, take cooler to freezer, and place frozen labeled eggs in freezer.

    Like I said, I only use this for fruits, but I'm guessing it would work. You just need a source of dry ice and you could probably get away with refrigerating eggs over a week or two so that you could do a mass production.

    Or, you could do some menu planning using the ingredients, like quiche, cookies, cakes, crepes, bread puddings..things that freeze well.

    April