Saving Bread Dough

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by thedrunkenchef, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. thedrunkenchef

    thedrunkenchef

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    Allez Cuisine!

    I've just got into the habit of making my own bread, few times a week. I find that the bigger batches of dough yield better bread, but I don't want to have one loaf lying around a few days.

    So, in order to freeze bread-dough, should I do it after it's risen the 2nd time, and how....in a plastic bag...or is it better just in the refrigerator if it will only be there a few days?

    Thanks for your time......salut!
     
  2. maryb

    maryb

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    Couple days in the fridge are no problem and you may want to start doing it with all your dough before baking. An extended rest lets the dough develop lots of flavors you won't get with a traditional rise.
     
  3. thedrunkenchef

    thedrunkenchef

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    Thanks Mary! I know it sounds like a silly question but I'm quite new to bread-making.

    :peace:
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Keeping doughs and preferments in the fridge for a day or three is called "delayed" or "retarded" fermentation. It's basically the starting point for sourdough, but without going quite that far.

    As a technique it's growing quite rapidly in popularity, because it produces a better tasting loaf.

    So, to answer your question, not only will a few days in the fridge not hurt, it will help.

    Much more than a week, however, and you'll have to start treating it like a sourdough mother, and feed it.
     
  5. chefray

    chefray

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    A day in the walk-in is SOP for my pizza dough. It rises very slowly and the flavor from the grain really develops. It takes on more a nutty flavor that I really like.
     
  6. maryb

    maryb

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    My pizza dough sits on the counter for 24 hours to ferment. It is a low hydration thin cracker crust dough that has to be rolled or sheeted.