Sauces

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Joined Oct 18, 2001
I’m studying sauces (on my own) for posting on my web site. I find Curry Sauce is listed as a variation both from Béchamel and Velouté. Is this right or wrong? Does it actually qualify as being potentially derived from either one? If not, what’s the difference? Is “Escoffier's Le Guide Culinaire” a good book to study about sauces and other cooking knowledge?

Thanks in advance…
Jack...
 
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Joined May 26, 2001
How technically detailed do you want to be, and how "authentic?"

Both Béchamel and Velouté are white sauces. The main difference between them is that Béchamel is made with milk, and Velouté is made with white stock. Either could be flavored with curry powder to make a "curry sauce." But it really wouldn't be the least bit authentic in regards to real South Asian cooking. Which brings us to ... Escoffier is great for learning about classic French cooking. The basic principles and techniques will always, always apply. However, a lot of the food is dated and would not be acceptable in our time of lightness and strong interest in "ethnic" cuisines. While the mother sauces are eternal, not all their derivatives are, thank goodness. So yes, read and study Escoffier, but look elsewhere for contemporary food.

EDIT: Just took a look at your website. NEAT!!!!! Sure looks authentic as far as LA food goes.
 
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Joined Oct 18, 2001
Thanks to both of you. The basis of the questions go back to the basics of the French sauce creations. As stated, I found curry sauce listed as variations of the two mother sauces referenced. I needed to know if curry sauce could be tied to one or the other, maybe both... whatever it is, is fine with me. Although not yet posted on my site, I want to be able to bring the curious folks back to the origins of sauces, then, walk them forward through time to today's sauces (in a very simple way). Kind of give them a feel for where they originated (like a family tree, or, org. chart). Taking this approach has helped me understand it all (so far). Here's a "for instance". I cook Gumbo, and, now I know the base for the outcome is Espagnole!

I am of Acadian decent (Guidry) a.k.a. Guedry (and others). Lived in Houma, near New Orleans (creole cooking persuasions) then moved to Lafayette (cajun persuasions). The web site is me, that's all I can say because that's all I really know. :)

I'll check those books out too!

Merci'
Jack
 
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Joined Oct 18, 2001
After reading about sauces a little I'm naturally curious about shortcuts. Are there any salt free bullion products out there that are decent in flavor? Here's what I'm thinking. If there is a salt free, or low salt bullion (cubes or granulated) I can acheive the flavor depth required for sauces (same as reduced stocks). I know reducing canned stock, or using a reduced amount of water in regular bullion leaves a heavy salt content (taste). I also understand that there will be a sacrifice in doing this, but I might be able to work that out.

Any help is appreciated! :confused:
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
7,067
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Joined Jun 11, 2001
Salt is added to many of these products to help preserve them. Lots of people are still stuck with the old technology, but here's some really good product which has come on the market within the last 5 years or so. It should not be too hard to find.

http://www.morethangourmet.com/

Kuan
 
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Joined Jun 13, 2002
i believe the sauce you are talking about is called indian or indienne sauce, made with veloute and curry but not to be confused with curry that is in indian cooking, it is classic and a very good sauce with pork, i recently used this on a banquet and it turned out very nice
 
3,853
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Joined May 26, 2001
Another good brand is Perfect Additions (but don't try to access the site right now; it seems to be down :( ) They have several different varieties (beef, chicken, veg, fish, maybe more). Sold frozen in 8-ounce cups, cases of 12 from distributors.

Oh, you asked about cubes or granulated. I always find that the low-sodium ones are, unfortunately, also low-flavor. But there are some European brands that although including the usual high sodium levels do have good flavor. I like Switzerland-based Knorr (which comes in an astonishing variety, especially if you look in Hispanic or Asian stores), and Seitenbacher, from Germany. They don't have those chemical tastes that, say, MBT/Wylers has.

Disclaimer: of course, using reduced stock is always the way to go. ;) :D ;) :D ;)
 
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Joined Oct 18, 2001
Thanks again to all. Kuan, I checked out the MTG site and actually found a source in my town, thanks. I’ll keep checking the Perfect Additions site, thanks Suzanne. Now back to work...:lips:
 
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