Sauce for hanger steak in Paris...

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by travelchick, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. travelchick

    travelchick

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    In 1999, we ate at a place in Paris called Relais de Venise and their speciality was entrecote with this special herby/oil/butter sauce (it was clear) served with frites.

    It was an institution at this place and we found out from our waitress that it was being served like this for the last 40 years. Literally, 75% of the people in this restaurant were eating this special and most of them were French, not tourists. We found out about this place from an expat who had lived there for 5 years but was now a customer of ours.

    Anyoo, we've tried to duplicate this sauce many times and simply cannot. It is NOT like a typical compound butter or some such. There are some herbs in there I just cannot place. Perhaps they are not available here? I don't know.

    It wasn't simply melted butter and parsely, there was something else going on. I imagine parsely was in there though. My husband remembers some kind of "evergreen" aroma or flavor or something like that.

    The only thing to even come CLOSE here at home was a couple of years ago at the Pinot Brasserie in Vegas at the Venetian. They had a hanger steak special with a sauce that was very, very close.

    To look at the sauce, it looked like a bunch of herbs chopped up and resting in olive oil. But that's not what it tasted like! LOL

    Man, I wish i had a trip to Paris coming up. It's been so long since I've tasted it.

    Does anyone have any idea what this may be?

    Thanks for any insight or help on this. :D
     
  2. chefjason

    chefjason

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    Keep in mind I've never had the sauce you are talking about nor have I tried anything I am about to tell you, so I may be way off base. From your description it sounds like the sauce is made along the same concept as beurre blanc. The concept is to whip cold butter into the warm flavorful base of your sauce (usually shallots, reduced white wine, etc.). By doing this, as the butter starts to melt from the contact with the warm reduction, the whipping will force in air and emulsify the two components and make a light fluffy delicate sauce. So basically you have your butter and herbs that gave you the idea of a compound butter. The other description you gave was herbs floating in olive oil. Well when the beurre blanc is in contact with the hot meat it will start to break and basically the butter melts. So here is my idea, again I've never tasted, seen, or made this sauce so I can't give you exact amounts but it's a base from where you can start experimenting.

    First start to sautee some shallots in butter. When sauteed add your chopped herbs (try chervil, tarragon, thyme, and rosemary(evergreen type flavor and aroma)and parsley). You have to use fresh, the dry stuff that has been sitting on the shelf for ten years just won't do. Next add a couple anchovy fillets pureed. Trust me, I know what you are thinking. Just like caesar dressing more than half the people who eat it don't even know it's there. It will add some salt content and enhance the flavor of your meat. If you don't like it you can try and leave it out but try it with too. Now add some white wine and reduce by half. Remove from heat and start to whip in cold butter chips a little at a time until you get the consistency and volume you desire.

    I don't know but I hope it helps with what you are looking for.
     
  3. anneke

    anneke

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    We make the same way too except that we montee with compound butter which contain all the herbs already. It's more practical in terms of prepping herbs, and it flavours the butter over a long period of time. We get pretty good results with it. Depending on the herbs you use, you can use this technique for all kinds of different meats, including fish.
     
  4. travelchick

    travelchick

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    Oh yes, fresh herbs are the only way to go. These days, I keep wondering why I have a cabinet full of the other variety...

    Your technique sounds kind of like doing a bearnaise but without the egg yolks. Interesting. I'll give it a try. Thanks for your help. :)
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    It's sauce fines herbs. You can buy the herb blen premixed from spice houses.
     
  6. armand

    armand

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    Sounds pretty much like a Café de Paris sauce. Just my 2 Cents.
     
  7. travelchick

    travelchick

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    Fines herbs, hadn't thought of that. Has a little lavender doesn't it? Interesting.

    Armand, yes it's similar but not quite it. There was another flavor in it that I just cannot place and now, it's been 5 years since I ate it so my "taste memory" is getting shakey. I need to go back to Paris and retaste it! :D
     
  8. dano1

    dano1

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    fines herbes=tarragon, parsley, chervil, chives.
    hth, danny
     
  9. armand

    armand

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    Sounds like a good plan to me. :D
     
  10. Iceman

    Iceman

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    OK. Swell. I find another 7-yo thread. Anyway ...

    I love the bageebies outta hanger steak. After trimming out the steak I season it w/ Webber Chicago Steak and Webber Veggie Grill seasonings, a shot of olive oil and a shot of worcestershire sauce. I put them in a zip-lock bag in the refrigerator for a couple-3 hours. I cook them on a screaming hot grill on three(3) sides for a total of 9-12 minutes (depending on size) for a nice med-rare. They rest for five(5) minutes before I cut them into 2-inch medallions, against the grain. 

    My sauce is simple. A box (8-oz) mushrooms sauteed w/ a big shallot in butter, then I add the same ingredients as I seasoned the steak, just less then 1/4 the amount. That cooks down for 3-5 minutes, then I add my special jus (1 can low-sodium beef stock). When that hits a boil I take it off heat and whisk in more butter and pinches of parsley and/or cilantro, finely minced. Maybe, if I've got some, I'll add 1-tspn steak sauce. I'll only do this if I'm serving w/ a plain potato that I haven't done much to. 

    Now depending on how much $$$ I've got to spend, I'll serve this w/ something like pop-corn shrimp, crab leggs, or even a lobster tail. If I can get really good rainbow trout fillets, I'll make that as the main dish w/ the medallions as a side. That however, is a different story. 

    I love me some hanger steak.