sanitation and safety concerns need advice please

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by dixiecup, May 9, 2015.

  1. dixiecup

    dixiecup

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    Just started at a resteraunt so I don't know if this if this is normal but it seems very not ok to me... food being batch cooked and then leftovers used for 9 days (fish). No set cutting boards no sanitizing after raw meat, dairy based sauces left out 6+ hours at a time produce rotting in bags and when I brought to kitchen manager I was told just to pick out the rotten. today the fridge broke and all the dairy went up to 65+ degrees and they moved it but are all still using it and milk was luke cold and butter softening. I'm planning to start culinary school in the fall and I was hoping this place would give me good experience but now I'm wondering if I made a bad choice in resteraunts and if I should leave or is this kinda stuff normal and I'm over reacting
     
  2. panini

    panini

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    The way you are describing the operation, there is no help or anything you can do to fix it, especially being entry level. You need to move on quickly. You don't want to have a hand in getting someone really sick or involved in illegal food service.
     
    flipflopgirl likes this.
  3. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Exactly what @panini said. Not all experiences are good ones, but they are experiences nonetheless. Sometimes you learn how not to do something. So, when you are in your own operation or working your way up the ladder, you make the right decisions based on what you experienced.  Best wishes for your culinary school adventure.
     
    skamper likes this.
  4. fablesable

    fablesable

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    Besides agreeing with the others......

    HOLY SCHMOLY!!!! I would be running out the door faster than lickity split if I witnessed that. Not just because all of the unsanitary issues but because if they are not great on food sanitation then god only knows what their personal hygiene is like. probably nil to none so that means whatever they have been touching, not washing and then you touching can make YOU VERY ILL!! Ewwwww!! makes my skin crawl..heaby jeebies.

    I am a huge fan of watching out for others but in this case.....you need to be watching out for number one....YOU!
     
  5. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Wow Ive heard and seen plenty of horror stories, and I'd rate this one an 8 out of 10. So Im curious who the

    hell is running this place....I mean what is their background? And is this somewhere in the U.S.?

    I ask because I'm dying to know how they're avoiding being fined or even shut down by the Health Services

    Department. Or even getting through inspections, for all that. 
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2015
  6. dixiecup

    dixiecup

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    I actually looked it up and they have never had any health violations for food but they haven't had a inspection in a year and a half. They also have a kitchen manager as opposed to a chef so no one in the kitchen has any formal training.
     
  7. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Chefs... how should @dixiecup  deal with the unspoken "stay a year" rule?

    Just leave the place off her CV or add it  and be faced with a possibly uncomfortable discussion and maybe come off as a gossip or even worse a whiner  (even tho it may be justified)?

    mimi
     
  8. chefboyog

    chefboyog

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    No " 1 year rule", leave it off the resume. They " just started". No brainer.
     
  9. dixiecup

    dixiecup

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    One more question.. I talked to the kitchen manager and put my notice in and explained my concerns I told her I would discuss it with the owner (who interviewed and hired me) but to respect chain of command I also wanted her to know that I was leaving. She said she would let the owner know about my resignation and then said something about blaming my leaving on another resteraunt. Should I speak to the owner directly (maybe they don't know how bad it is) or just the kitchen manager say what they will.
     
  10. panini

    panini

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    Not worth it.
     
  11. dixiecup

    dixiecup

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    Thank you everyone for your insight I think I will follow panini's advice and leave the situation alone. In the mean time I purchased cia's "the professional chef for some light reading :) while I look for a entry level position under someone willing and to teach me. Any suggestions what kind of places I should be looking for what to avoid. I do not live in a large city.
     
  12. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Well for starters, you now know there are often shenanigans taking place behind those kitchen doors, practices you 

    wouldn't like. You cant always tell much from the front of the house either, as many times the FOH is immaculate while the 

    BOH looks like a germ-rot bomb was set off months ago. So, with your new-found (bad) experience, you might want to try to

    uncover those issues, if they exist, at the time of your future interviews and BEFORE you're hired. If possible, try to get an

    impromptu kitchen tour (no, not always easy)--now that you know what to look (and smell) for, you might see the warning

    signs early and keep looking if you need to. 

    IMO, finding a good match with a kitchen starts with a good match in attitudes and kitchen philosophy. Don't be afraid to 

    throw your viewpoints out there, or to probe your interviewer (preferably head chef, not some personnel flunkie) for theirs.

    In the olden days you could often ask why former employees left, and get an answer--but these days that subject is fraught 

    with paranoia, so not much help there anymore. 
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2015