Sangria poached pears : )

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by lionel-cosgrave, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. lionel-cosgrave

    lionel-cosgrave

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    1. This is an recipe i used to cook At the Orinoco ON barge dtreet in kent.
    2.  
    3. Halve the vanilla pods lengthways, scrape out the black seeds and put in a large saucepan with the wine, snagria, cinnamon and thyme. Cut each piece of pod into three long thin strips, add to pan, then lower in the pears.
    4. Poach the pears, covered, for 20-30 mins, making sure they are covered in the wine. The cooking time will very much depend on the ripeness of your pears - they should be tender all the way through when pierced with a cocktail stick. You can make these up to 2 days ahead and chill.
    5. Take the pears from the pan, then boil the liquid to reduce it by half so that it's syrupy. Serve each pear with the cooled syrup, a strip of vanilla, a piece of cinnamon and a small thyme sprig.
    •  
    • 4 vanilla pods
    • 1 75cl bottle sangria
    • 500g caster sugar
    • 1/2 cinnamon stick , halved
    • fresh thyme sprig , plus sprigs to seve
    • 2 pears , peeled, but kept whole with stalk intact
    Serves 2.
     
  2. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    [​IMG]

    Poached pears and poached peaches are very common here in Spain.

    Sangría is an Andalusian red wine beverage which stems from red wine which is created with a dry red young Castilla La Mancha, Aragon or Extremaduran red wine ( tinto joven ) with: the juice of fresh oranges, fresh lemons, Jerez Brandy or even Cassis Licor plus: vanilla, castor sugar and other liquors in addition

    to minced seasonal fruits  ... It is a big jar industry here. I have seen Spanish people use for a topping over vanilla icecream.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2012
  3. mithunchowdhury

    mithunchowdhury

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    Sounds great! Love your post :)
     
  4. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Thought it to be of interest to have a Spanish recipe too ...

    Sangria Punch --- Serve in large crystal pitcher ---

    4 cups light bodied well chilled young red wine from Castilla de La Mancha ( Ciudad Real if possible or La Rioja )

    180 ml Spanish Brandy from Jerez de La Frontera

    1/2 cup castor or extra fine sugar ( 120 grams )

    2 cups club soda

    2 oranges, one for juice and one for slices

    2 lemons, one for juice and one for slices

    8 berries assorted or 8 strawberries or black berries

    a shot glass of Cassis Liquor

    1) Mix wine, brandy and sugar stirring to dissolve the sugar

    2) chill well

    3) just before serving add the club soda and Cassis ...
     
  5. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    @ LC : You are so right, it is a very good dessert after a meal. Thank you for sharing it. I normally make mine in red wine with a violin note in chocolate on top.

    @ MC : Love the recipe, just about the same way  my sister-in-law makes it. .....cassis, it makes the drink.

    Petals.
     
  6. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    To kick off with, I make my own Sangría here in Madrid for the poached fruit, never using pre-bottled Sangría sold in supermarkets, as this is pure Plonk ...  I used a La Rioja red wine called :  Marqués de Cáceres which is exported to the USA and the UK.

    Your recipe was tried yesterday evening and the results were " Lovely " ...

    I used Peaches, because I do not care much for the variety of Spanish pears grown here ... They are green, hard and spotted -- which does not appeal to me visually. The peaches hailing from Aragon are fabulous, sweet and aromatic.  

    Happy Holidays.
     
  7. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    @Petals:  Yes, the Cassis ! ... I believe, It is important to use a good red wine ... Designation of Origin La Rioja which is 85 % Tempranillo, 10% Graciano and 5% Garnacha grape varieties ... I have never tried to make it with a Californian red or a Chilean ... However, for ease, one can try a Miguel Torres Sonoma red based variety La Coroña ( The Crown ... ). The key to marinating the pears or peaches, is that one makes a fabulous Sangría verses a bottled premade plonk Sangría. Yes ? Happy Holidays. MC.  
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Lionel, I read you use a bottle of sangria to poach the pears in. You could also simply use a good wine and add spices and sugar to your own taste. It has to be said that storebought sangria isn't all that exciting. Above all, even most Spanish people will never touch sangria, it's a tourist thing. I made these poached pears for Christmasday as a dessert served with homemade chocolate mousse. In our stores you will find "eating pears" which are soft and ready to eat and "stewing pears" which will always remain tough and aren't eaten raw. I used these small pears which are very hard and only available this time of the year for a short period. On the other hand, you can poach them on their whole; when cutting them you will have a nice color variation as you can see.

    I used an Italian Montepulciano d'Abruzzo wine. As long as the wine has some "body", such as merlot, grenache, syrah..

    Add around 200 grams of sugar (or to taste, I used about 120 grams), 1 star anis, 2 cloves, a few kardemompods just cracked but seeds still inside, 2 kaffirleaves, a little lemonzeste, 1 cinnamon stick, 3 juniperberries. In fact, a lot of spices go well, just minimize star anis and cloves, they are very powerfull.

    Add peeled pears, cover with a round of parchment paper so they will always be submerged. I cooked these for 45 minutes untill the point where a sharp knife went easily through.

    Then, I took the pears out, filtered first and then reduced the liquid untill slightly syrupy consistency. Nice wintery dessert!

    [​IMG]  [​IMG]

    [​IMG]  [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  9. ishbel

    ishbel

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    ChrisB

    Like you, I'd use a better quality of wine - probably French or Italian.  I've never been too keen on Spanish wines - probably because when I first used to visit waaaaay back in the 60s, most of the wines were pretty awful.  I know they are much better nowadays, but I still prefer the wines of other countries - even to cook with!
     
  10. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Chris, I notice you leave the cores and seeds in your pears. Any particular reason for that?
     
  11. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    There's no particular reason, Ky. If they were bigger I would have emptied the whole pears with a small "parisienne" spoon, you know, that thing to cut small balls out of melons etc.

    These pears are quite small and I noticed that the cores and the seeds had become very soft and edible after cooking! But, indeed, not everyone ate them.

    @Ishbel; Oh, I also remember Spanish wines from the past. It is true that Spanish wines have improved dramatically ever since. But, I wouldn't use their typical tempranillo wine for a recipe like this. Those tempranillos wines are mostly much too "pronounced" imo.
     
     
  12. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Although it obviously doesn't bother you, Chris, fwiw I used to have a neighbor with a tree that grew those little pears. A standard corer was much to big, so I got a small-diameter brass tube, sharpened one end slightly, and it worked like a charm.

    Wish I still had access to the virtually unlimited supply of those pears that I had in those days. You hardly ever see them in the stores around here, and, when you do, they're incredibly expensive.
     
  13. Iceman

    Iceman

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    Very good call. For me, the Marqués de Cáceres label is in a very select group of winemakers. The group is "Wines that I've had that have never sucked".  Their juice has always been serious QPR and is easily matched up with food. It just goes well, you don't have to work hard picking out specific foods. It's also been, in the Chicagoland area, easy to find with good distribution. 
     
     
  14. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Well I'll be.., now that's what I call a good idea! Thanks for that KY.
     
  15. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Margcata, when using fresh peaches, many times white wine is used instead of red wine, but, of course it's always your preference that counts. They are not peeled when poaching them as the peel will give a nice color to the white wine.

    I remember Antonio Carlucci made them in one of his fabulous TV appearances (I'm a big fan). The color of the wine turns heavenly pink. I also remember he made a sorbet with the remaining juice, a fantastic idea imo as peaches are more seen as a summery treat. Carlucci used an insane amount of sugar in the poaching liquid.
     
  16. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I remember that Carluccio programme, too, ChrisB...   I think he was in Sicily.  I've got 2 or 3 of his books and enjoy lunch at one of the branches of his chain of restaurants.

    Did you see his recent series with Gennaro Contaldo?  Two old Italians going back to areas where they grew up and the dishes they knew from childhood - magical!
     
  17. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Firstly, good news, pleased to hear that my recipe had been very much enjoyed.

    This is a tradtitional Bordeaux and northern Spanish, La Rioja dessert ( and huge industry too in Jar goods ) for centuries as of course, to prevent the fruit from over ripening and becoming un-usuable.

    Yes, in Áragon, peaches are marinated and cooked in white or red wine as you can see in foto however, it is unusual in the La Rioja region, due to this area being a predominately red wine Designation of Origin. Calanda peaches are from a village called Calanda, Áragon, northeast of Madrid 3hrs. [​IMG]

    I have a Le Cordon Bleu recipe too, the Bordeaux wines are implemented.

    Peaches: there is an Aragonese peach called CALANDA which does not have the Fuzzy exterior and thus, these are not normally peeled. However, in La Rioja it is commonplace, that Spaniards on the whole Peel All Fruit. Maybe less common in USA and Northern Europe etcetra ... Spaniards even peel apples, pears, nectarines, peaches etcetra.

    I have even been surprised that they peel white grapes ( 12 served for midnight to celebrate New Year 12am with their Cava or Champagne ) and create seedless for this special celebration ...

    Perhaps, it is a custom  that had begun years ago for sanitary purposes ... Personally grape skins contains some wonderful oxidents for skin care and health.

    This is up to Home Gourmet or Chef as to whether he or she wishes to provide the fiber and texture or have a more delicate fruit consistency.

    Thanks for feedback and input.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2012
  18. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Unfortunately I have never seen the Sicilian gent you have mentioned however, there are several Spanish Chefs, Chefs and  home gourmets with these type of programmes in Spain, and two of them have recently  published a lovely book on their epicurean escapes. They are the stars of a series called:  Cuentame ( Tell me ), Immanol Arias ( Antonio in the series and Patriarch ) is the actor. He has been travelling all over Spain from the Canary Islands through his native Basque Country and has visited farms, farmer markets, rural restaurants, wineries, rural hotels, herders and shepherds, dairies etcetra. Very interesting.

    I am uncertain if their new book is available in English however, it might be available in French as Immanol´s co-star is a bilingual French speaker and possibly a French National.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  19. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Ishbel, I didn't miss a split second of "Two greedy Italians" on the BBC which is on our cableTV selection, even better, a Belgian food channel is now programming the whole series too, so I'm gonna watch again. A propos, the series comes with a book too, it's on my buying list.

    I sincerely hope many others can enjoy watching this series, one of the most heartwarming series I ever saw, including the social evolution in Italy mentioning that young women sadly enough didn't find time to cook, the rehabcenter where all kinds of artisanal products are made by people in rehab etc. etc. I loved watching every second! I don't even mention the teasing interaction between the northern Carluccio and the southern emotional Cantaldo. And of course, the cooking is fabulous, I have to say that Gennaro Contaldo is less known but could easily be the better cook of the two..?

    Hope you also followed the latest "Masterchef, The Professionals" on the BBC. My goodness, those 3 finalists blew me away. Such young skilled professionals, stunning. If that's the next generation pro's, the rest of culinary Europe better watch out for what's coming from the UK!
     
  20. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Interestingly, Contaldo is THE major influence on Jamie Oliver....  he often appears in Jamie's programmes AND in his restaurants, as an influence, eg the bread-making!  He's a wonderful chef.

    I DID watch it, ChrisB...  of course, there are those who think that southern Europe is where it's at, cuisine wise.... some of us know better, eh?!!!

    Tonight there was a new series on BBC2 - a British art expert, travelling with Giorgio Locatelli in Sicily.  If you get a chance - WATCH....  Locatelli did an amazing dish with sardines and bucatini pasta...   Andrew said it was the best pasta dish he'd ever eaten.  I have eaten a few times at Locanda Locatelli in London.  I love his food.