Salty Marinated Chicken

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by raibeaux, Jul 3, 2013.

  1. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Hi.  A question, please.  If marinated fried chicken is coming out a bit too salty, what would be your first check?

    Would you change length of time in the marinade first or the strength of the marinade?

    At the present, I am marinating 14 hours, using one cup of marinate (mostly salt) to two gallons of water.

    There is a suggested "quick marinate" process which calls for doubling the strength and marinating for only 30 minutes.

    I'm rinsing the chicken after marinating and storing in a s/s container, and I'm also wondering if I should re-rinse before breading after a period of hours.  We partially dry the chicken before breading, but it's really just getting the excess moisture off...not really drying it much.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks much.
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Put less salt. 1 cup of salt is a lot and then to how much chicken?
     
  3. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Hmm.  How much difference does the quantity of chicken matter in a given strength of marinade?  I think this may be where the problem lies, as I've been marinating both fairly small and fairly large amounts of raw chicken in the same amount/strength of the marinate.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    Sounds like you're brining, not marinating. I don't think rinsing and re-rinsing is necessary, I would skip those steps.

    I don't think it matters much how much chicken goes into the brine either, I think it only matters how strong your brine is. And if you find the resulting chicken too salty, your brine is too strong. Put less salt for the same quantity of water (or more water for the same quantity of salt) so you have a weaker brine. 
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2013
  5. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    I usually make a brine , 1 cup salt for one gallon water

    If using Kosher salt , 1 1/2 - 2 cups  per gallon water

    I see no problem brining for 14 hrs with these amounts.

    Some points :

    1) the larger the crystal the faster and easier salt will dissolve in water, but the slower it will dissolve on the surface of meats

    2) the smaller the crystals the heavier salt is by volume

    3) One cup of normal, everyday table salt can weigh twice as much as some brands of kosher salt

     4) One of the problems with kosher salt is that it isn’t as consistent by weight. So why use it? Kosher salt is very pure salt. No additives are added to prevent caking and no iodine is added
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2013