Saltimbocca

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by 9hundred, Aug 4, 2003.

  1. 9hundred

    9hundred

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    Sometimes Veal can be a bit tough. I am making saltimbocca. Is it a good idea to marinate it and what should it soak in?

    Also, is it true that cooked pasta will keep longer when coated in oil?
     
  2. mike

    mike

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    You dont have to marinate it at all as its the cooking process that tenderises the meat & not the marinade which only adds flavour.
    However if you wanted to you could marinate in wine, garlic,thyme,peppercorns & bayleaf. Save the marinade when you seal the dried & browned veal, add to pot with other ingredients & bring to boil cover put in oven & cook long & slow.

    Although pasta doesnt last longer in oil it makes it easier to re heat as it doesnt gloop together.

    :)
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Your veal should not be tough if your using a high quality meat and have pounded very well. Cutlets generally come from the leg that has a great deal of action with these muscles so they will be tougher. Be sure your pan is hot and you cook the veal quickly on both sides,remove keep warm and develope your sauce from the Fond. If money is no object,pounding veal butt tenders are excellent for this dish.
     
  4. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    correct me if I'm wrong... saltimbocca is veal scallopini wiht sage and cheese in the middle of two slices of veal with a white wine sauce? the veal is thinnly slice and pounded with a lite breading.
    Um ....I've never had a tough one.
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Shroom,

    Procuitto is pounded into the veal and a couple sage leaves rolled with a rolling pin,dredged in flour,sauteed,then a lemon/white wine pan reduction finished with whole butter.
     
  6. 9hundred

    9hundred

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    I put cheese in the middle with shaved ham and sage without crumbing it, after browning in the pan, I deglase with marsala port wine.

    The veal is sometime tough because of the sinew stips through it. So, if I were to soak it in some lemon juice and oil that might help to break down some fibers.
     
  7. pongi

    pongi

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    9hundred,
    I too think you shouldn't soak your veal in lemon juice as it would pre-cook the meat, which cannot be recommended in this case.
    If you're not sure about the quality of your meat, have it cut very thinly with a meat slicer, like ham. This is a trick I often use when I have only few time left to cook my Involtini. I cover these thin veal slices with thin slices of prosciutto, put cheese and sage in the middle, roll up the involtini, cut them in 2 inch pieces and fix each piece with a toothpick (or skewer 4-5 pieces together). Then I proceed as usual. This way, they're done in 5-6 mins and never end up tough.

    Pongi
     
  8. britcook

    britcook

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    The classic saltimbocca uses pounded escalopes of veal, slices of prosciutto and a sage leaf pinned (cocktail stick) pinned outside. Saute in olive oil, remove, deglaze with Marsala and reduce. You should not need to marinate, the pounding will tenderize the meat.
     
  9. mike

    mike

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    Doh !
    Just realised im yabbing about the wrong dish . sorry , we dont get much veal now thanks to the PC brigade, thought dish was osso bucco ooops ! red faced !
     
  10. 9hundred

    9hundred

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    Thanks anyway.