Salt

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Aug 9, 2015.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    What kind of salt do you use for most of your basic cooking?  So many recipes call for kosher salt and I don't have any, had some but didn't like it so never bought it again.  In general I use sea salt for all of my cooking.  I have finishing salts like pink himalayan, smoked maldon, truffle salt and fleur de sel.

    Also, how do you salt your food?  Do you prefer by hand or do you have a shaker or utensil by which you measure?
     
  2. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    NaCl, what else?
     
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  3. chefross

    chefross

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    Sea salt has minerals that can flavor food differently than table salt.

    The use of salt can be controlled better by sprinkling in my opinion, over using a shaker.

    Also table salt is not pure salt. It has anti-clumping ingredients added.
     
  4. ordo

    ordo

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    Koukou: check here. In theory all salts are Koscher.

    A nice way to use rock salt is with a pepper mill. It gives you more control and you can change the size of the crystals to your needs.
     
  5. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    I sprinkle Kosher salt when cooking and measure it when baking. This is my go-to salt. I would probably use Diamond if I could get my hands on it but Chicago is the home of Morton, so unless I make a special trip way out of my way to go to a big grocery store in an Orthodox neighborhood, it is impossible to find.

    I also use fine sea salt--sometimes French, sometimes Greek, sometimes Italian. It depends on which market I am shopping in when I need salt.

    I have a pepper mill of Maldon sea salt for finishing but, in truth, most of the time I have already salted during preparation and it doesn't get used terribly often, though lately sliced tomatoes have been getting the treatment. Thanks to this conversation, I just filled another empty pepper grinder (can never pass one up in a thrift store) with French Sel Gros that has been languishing in the back of a cupboard for a very long time. 

    As for all salt being Kosher, I think all salt is Pareve--which is what the article above refers to, but not all salt has the circled U symbol that indicates the facility where it is produced has been certified by a representative of the Orthodox Union--which I guess makes it somehow extra Kosher.
     
  6. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Most baking recipes that measure by volume are written for regular table salt.

    Kosher (and other similar salts) measure up short as there are void spaces between the crystals.

    For everything else I use Kosher.

    I know it and can measure by eye...

    I loved the flavor of salt until the doc spanked my butt a few years back when my BP required me to start on meds.

    Now I am satisfied with however much I add to the dishes and seldom does anyone complain that something is bland.

    If so I have the usual collection in the pantry for them to tweak to their heart's content lol.

    mimi
     
  7. luc_h

    luc_h

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    It depends on the application:

    if the salt will be dissolved in water (like soup) it doesn't matter which salt you use because for the same weight of salt in a specific volume of liquid, any salt will taste the same.

    If the purpose of the salt is topical meaning that the person will eat the salt placed on top of the food (i.e undissolved) the shape and size of the salt crystals will yield different texture and taste experience because taste buds will react to the dissolving rate of the salt crystal in saliva (it's an electrochemical reaction that have different rates depending on the amount of time and the dissolving nature of the crystal shape)

    so large salt crystals on pretzels give long salty exposure to the tongue while powdered salt on flavoured chip releases quickly for a hit of seasoning to each chip.

    I use regular salt in water and Kosher or pickling salt (large crystals) for topical applications (including rubs and wilting cabbage for coleslaw)

    Luc H.
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Absolutely! Most salt is nearly 99% NaCl or natrium chloride plus impurities like minerals and oxides which will color the salt. And indeed like ChefRoss said, sometimes other stuff is added to prevent it becoming a solid rock. Grandmothers added a little rice to the salt to absorb the moisture and keep it loose.

    Nearly all types of salt used while cooking will taste exactly the same. When added after cooking, like on a cooked steak, a little Maldon or Fleur de sel will make a difference... in texture, not in taste. Those salts give a bit of a crunch, the taste is like any other salt.

    I yet have to meet a person who can tell the difference in salt tastes!
     
  9. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    More and more I find recently written baking recipes that call for Kosher rather than table salt. I do keep table salt in the house and do use it sometimes when baking older recipes but more and more often when I encounter a recipe that calls for table salt, I often just crush some Kosher between my fingers and up the qty slightly to make up for the space between the crystals. It's pure laziness. The Kosher salt is in the front of the cupboard. I usually have to dig to get to the table salt and the cupboard where I keep the salts, spices and vinegars takes determination and courage to sort through. (Thank you, ethnic markets of Chicago.)

    Like you, Mimi, I've used Morton Kosher salt for so long, I also measure it by the feel in the palm of my hand or by eyeballing it. 
     
  10. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    I always use kosher salt for cooking. It contains no iodine or any other compounds or chemicals . All  salts are not Kosher it must be produced under the auspices of a Rabbi and have nothing added.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2015
  11. maryb

    maryb

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    Mostly kosher although I sometimes keep a gray sea salt on hand for things like french fries where I consider salt a very important finishing touch.
     
  12. chezpopp

    chezpopp

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    Kosher salt added by hand while cooking and finish with sea salt. Kosher salt because of the large flat flakes dissolves better in sauces. For sea salt there is a company called jacobson. They are out of the pacific northwest. The only hand harvested sea salt produced in the usa. It is epic. Very very good stuff. I tend to infuse salt on my own if i need to but they have a stumptown coffee salt. A lemon a pinot noir and a vanilla salt. All delicious.
     
  13. luc_h

    luc_h

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    Sorry Ed, I think this is incorrect.  Kosher salt is short for Koshering salt.  It is not necessary a kosher supervised food but a type of food that is used to remove surface blood from meat i.e. koshering meat.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosher_salt

    Luc H.
     
  14. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    I think most people would understand "Kosher" salt to have been packaged in a facility that had itself been "Koshered," meaning that equipment has been cleaned, and that ingredients and packaging are used  strictly in accordance with Kosher dietary laws. There are a number of "kashrut" certifying agencies that ensure Kosher laws are followed by food preparation facilities. The Orthodox Union in NYC is the largest in the world. The U in a circle symbol on food packaging is theirs. Food preparation facilities don't keep a rabbi on hand at all times to supervise but they are inspected periodically by specially trained representatives of the OU to ensure that Kosher laws are being followed. I don't think anyone would ever consider as Kosher any box of salt that didn't have a Kosher certification symbol of some sort on the package.
     
  15. panini

    panini

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    What makes salt kosher? What’s the difference between “kosher salt” and regular table salt?

    Answer:


    Salt is a mineral, and as such, pure salt is always kosher. Some brands of salt have a kosher symbol on the package, and that way you know that a reliable kosher certification agency is checking to make sure that nothing else gets mixed in to the salt and that it’s 100% kosher.

    Rochel Chein for Chabad.org
     
  16. chefross

    chefross

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    Morton Salt makes different kinds of salt.

    The Koshering salt must be processed in separate machinery from the rest that is made.

    The anti-clogging agent MAY contain un-Kosher products and this is what separates the 2. Maybe?
     
  17. luc_h

    luc_h

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    This may help in the confusion:

    http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/kosher-salt.asp

    We have all heard of salt being called "kosher," but what exactly does that mean—kosher salt? Typically, the confusion derives from the fact that the word "kosher" has two different meanings in terms of salt, and that salt can be considered one type of kosher, both types, or not kosher at all. People often say "kosher salt" when they mean either kosher certified salt, or kosher-style flake salt.

    Luc H.
     
  18. ordo

    ordo

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    I guess for most of us, non Jews, any salt is OK as long as it's salty.
     
  19. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I was kind of thinking the same; what on earth does kocher salt do that other salt doesn't do? Does it taste any different? If it's so pure, then it's almost 100% NaCl, so what's all the fuss about?
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015
  20. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    I use non-iodized anything