Salt Pork

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by pcieluck, Jul 24, 2011.

  1. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    I saw it at the store, dirt cheap, an ingredient i've never used before, and decided to give it an experiemnt.  First night I tried to substitute slab bacon with it in my Chasseur, and cut a small slice of it into lardons.  My stew was unbearably salty and the pork was still very tough. So I soaked the rest of it for a day, draining it twice to draw out some of the saltiness.  Then I stewed it in court-bouillon for about 3 hours.  I cut a little piece and it was still kind of tough. Gave it another hour, still tough. Then it was time for work so I ultimately got ready and forgot about it.  When I came home I was pleasantly surprised that there was still plenty of liquid left in my pot, and I wasn't left with a big hunk of carbon or a pot with a hole in the bottom.  However, it was just as tough as before I left.  Would anyone share how they like to prepare it?
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Normally one does not eat it ad if you do  cut it into thin strips and deep fry it. It is most used as a seasoning for many sauces and soups and then thrown away. It can't replace bacon for eating, don't even try. Thats why it as you say is dirt cheap.
     
  3. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    Makes sense. I tasted the resulting liquid from the stewing process and it liked it MUCH better than the broth I make for split-pea soup from hamhocks.  
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    A must in New England  Clam or Fish Chowders, and great for any soup you want a distinct flavor in  like pea, bean, lentil etc.
     
  5. mikez

    mikez

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    Yes as Chef Ed has said, saltpork is great as an addition to stews and such as a flavoring agent. I wouldn't really eat it though.
     
  6. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    Now I soaked it first to get some of the saltiness out. That was necessary right?
     
  7. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Depnds on the volume of food you have and what you are making. It is not always a rule of thumb.
     
  8. gobblygook

    gobblygook

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    Checking to see if I have this right.  If not, please correct me.

    Fatback is from the area around the spine of the pig.

    Salt pork and "back bacon" are made from fatback.  The difference being that salt pork is salt cured and "back bacon" is smoke cured.

    Most of the bacon you see in the grocery store is made from the belly region, not the back.  The fat is softer in the belly and harder in the back region. 

    Did I get my "pig parts" right?