Salmon En Croute

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by pcieluck, Apr 22, 2011.

  1. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    One that I'm doing a lot of research on right now. What I'm curious about, and can't find anything similar to, is the cut of salmon. Most of the time this dish is made with a large or small fillet of salmon, or two sandwiched together, with mustard or an herb compound butter and finally wrapped in pastry.  What if, instead, I wanted to take a salmon that has been prepped as if it where going to be cut into salmon steaks, but left whole. Then trimmed, tucked, and tied to make a large cylindrical salmon parcel. Interested in this for both salmon en croute, and for roasts that won't be using pastry as well.
     
  2. french fries

    french fries

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    It's better if you can make sure you're not leaving any bones in obviously. Otherwise I can't see why it would be a problem. 

    One thing to watch for is the size of the salmon... too large and the pastry could be cooked before the fish. 
     
  3. chefedb

    chefedb

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    2 questions here -- 1. is salmon en croute cannot be rolled and tied ,how would you remove string?

          Filet a 4 to 6 ounce filet ,smear it with mayo,dill,worstishire,tobassco and dijon. top with a piece of leek cook 18 to 20 minutes at 400.

       Second way -- butterfly a 5 ounce filet and stuff it with whatever you want. Then place it in a piece of commercial plastic wrap and roll tightly. Steam or poach till done then let cool slightly ,unwrap and slice . This can be used for cold or hot presentations.

    Great part of anything En croute is that you can always cut the portion smaller as pastry makes it look bigger.
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Whole salmon can be done En croute a la Paul Bocuse. same way as doing a single portion. and also whole poached in plastic or cheesecloth but harder to handle.

    Most places do individual because if you do whole salmon en croute and do not sell it all , what do you do with it next day Cold Puff Pastry on fish is not exactly the greatest thing.
     
  5. chefross

    chefross

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    There is a Russian dish called "Kulebiaka" in which to whole sides of salmon are sandwiched between a rice filling before being wrapped in Brioche pastry. The filling consists of rice mixed with chopped hard boiled egg, sauteed onion, mushrooms and fish veloute. I've made it many times.
     
  6. benway

    benway

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    Leaving the bones in is a real deal breaker for this dish IMO.  If I were to serve something like this it would be with two fillets, skinned and pin bones removed nested together in a ying yang type formation.  It can't be tied if one is to wrap it in pastry, so I would probably sprinkle a little Activa RM (transglutaminase enzymes) between the fillets to join it into one cylindrical mass.

    Personally I'm with Ed that the individual salmon en croute is a little more convenient.  When I'm cooking for the crew while we're salmon fishing in the summer, I have a strange take on salmon en croute that makes for a quick meal with little clean up.  I have a small Taiyaki press that I bring on the boat and I'll make "salmon en croute" in the style of taiyaki with whatever salmon scraps I've got.  I started this as a way to make chum salmon palatable but the crew loved it.  It's a pretty fun presentation and extremely easy.
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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    Not sure what that stuff is but it doesn't sound like something I want to put in my mouth... 

    You could just slather some salmon mousseline (4 oz salmon, 2 oz heavy cream, 1 egg white, salt & pepper, pulse in food processor until mousse-like) on the first filet and lay the second one on top. Add some minced fresh herbs in your mousseline and it'll look beautiful when sliced. 
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2011
  8. benway

    benway

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    You've already put it in your mouth.  Transglutaminase is a naturally occurring enzyme in animals, plants, and bacteria but is only recently available in useful form to restaurants and cooks.  This particular enzyme fuses proteins together with such strength that its really like a whole uncut protein mass.  Its also a hell of a lot of fun and I strongly recommend it to people who like eating meat.
     
  9. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    So i'm guessing that what I have in mind cant be done without bones being present.  This isn't meant for professional dinner service or banquet. This is really more of a photo gallery piece or something i'd put in front of a date that's impressive and a tad bit suggestive.  I just have this loony idea of a glorious, maybe 5 inch tall, near perfectly cylindrical, tower of food on a place, but fish may not be the protein of choice for this.

    And really now, I am smarter than to wrap twine underneath the pastry....
     
  10. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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  11. benway

    benway

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    I don't know what's more disgusting, the product or the price.
     
  12. brownedoff

    brownedoff

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    Hmmm. I recently had something a bit like this but not quite as high. It was done by creating a cylindrical mousse that featured the skinned and boned fillets inside and then wrapping the mousse in the fish skin. It worked pretty well.
     
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2011
  13. chefedb

    chefedb

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    You might want to try Braiding the fish. That is cutting in 3 long strips and actually braid it. It is a fantastic presentation and you very rarely see it. You can mix strips of salmon and sole
     
     
  14. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    You might want to try Braiding the fish. That is cutting in 3 long strips and actually braid it.

    Easier said than done, so you'll want to practice a bit. Keep in mind that your starting strips have to be as evenly sized as possible, and much longer than the finished product. And, as with a challah, it works best if you start in the middle then braid towards the ends.

    But once you get it down it is probably the most impressive fish presentation you can do---especially if, as Ed suggests, you mix two different colored fish.
     
  15. chefedb

    chefedb

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    KY   I was going to say like a Challah but thought maybe some people didn't know what that was? But thats how I learned how to do the fish. Last time I did it was as an appi course about 12 years ago served with Sauce Nastua
     
  16. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    That sounds amazing. What would be the preferred way of cooking that?  I'm going to assume poached or steamed.
     
  17. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Poached -Broiled I don't like steaming as you lose flavor. lso I spelled it wrong it is '''Sauce Nantua''' Or a light Lobster or crab sauce
     
  18. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    You can depend on the fact that I will be trying this the first occasion I find.
     
  19. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Practice the braiding first with 3 pieces of wide ribbon.
     
  20. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I usually broil them and serve with a sauce, but can easily see poaching them.

    Nantua sounds like a good choice, Ed. Last time I made these I used a saffron-cream sauce. 

    If you sauce them, pcieluck, keep in mind that you want the braids to sit on top of the sauce, so as to not hide the visual appeal.

    A nice touch, too, is to reverse the colors. That is, do half the braids with 2 salmon and one whitefish, the other with 2 whitefish and one salmon. As an app, three small braids on a long plate really look spectacular when you include both patterns. F'rinstance, try a double salmon on the ends, flanking a double white.

    I think using ribbon is a good way to learn how to braid. Even better is Venetian Blind cord. But with fish, the only way to develop a feel for braiding is to actually braid with it. There's definately a learning curve.