Salary advice

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by PastryAllDay, Jul 27, 2018.

  1. PastryAllDay

    PastryAllDay

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    Hi all.


    So, crowdsourcing some help bc normal payroll aggregators have a hard time processing my job description. I would like to hear if my ask is insane (since it's a gigantic raise), or if it makes sense. I am going to ask for $25/hour, at 60 hours a week (which is kind of inevitable on the timeline they have), which leads me to about 78,000. Problem is I took a bit of an hourly pay cut when I started, being promised a 45 hr week. (It would have been a raise if it was 45 hours, but it's 60 and at a sprint). Did the math and got furious realizing I make about 18/hour bc of the hours I work, and now the correction is due. Does this seem justified? I love the company, they are doing great financially, all my employees are paid super well, but I'm just embarrassed to ask for so much money and have heard "don't think about it hourly" so many times I don't know which way is right.

    Job description: Exec chef for manufacturing bakery, 50 employee, 24-7 operation. Also manage/develop 2 retail cafe, with seasonal menu development and savory programs, btw 6-10 thousand in sales daily for the cafes, but our main bit is wholesale. Located in major metropolitan city. (US).

    Responsible for developing new wholesale product, "fixing" current wholesale products, new program development (2 new programs in 1 year), training senior staff to management, bringing kitchen up to compliance for new Ag and Mkt. regulations (writing and executing all haccp plans- 22 in total). All hiring and firing. Overseeing day to day ops, and acting as last resort for staff if out/sick/etc and sous chefs are unavailable. Acting as face of company and building community relationships. Weighing/research on business decisions about future program develop./ next investment steps.
    2 years w the company, 14 yrs exp total, 3 1/2 years as management.

    Sorry this is so long, wanted to give a good picture. Thanks for any comments!
     
    Emojitsu likes this.
  2. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    If I'm doing the math right your making 56k a year. I think with your experience you should be around the 75k mark. I think you should take your case to the powers to be and explain to them like you just did to us. You have a good case....Good Luck........ChefBillyB
     
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  3. someday

    someday

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    Why do they even pay you by the hour? Why not just salary?

    I think what you are asking for is reasonable.
     
    Pat Pat likes this.
  4. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    This is the first time I have seen an executive chef getting paid by the hour.

    Also, usually an executive chef has the perk of being able to come to work as much or as little as s/he wants; it can be 20 hours a week or 100 hours.
     
  5. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    I need to also add a bet to my response. When you accept a position at 56K and are working for 2 years it's had to get that kind of jump in pay. I'm not saying you don't deserve more, I'm just saying it's a big leap. The only time I got what I wanted was during negotiations and contract agreements during the hiring process. It also makes a difference if I applied for the position or the company seeks me out. When a company wants me it's easier to negotiate and get what I want.
    I think the company will weigh if they can replace you with the same caliber person at the same wage. If they feel they can, your shit out of luck.
     
  6. foodpump

    foodpump

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    In my experience, everything goes back to the initial interview when salary was agreed on. If nothing was agreed on back then “ in a year from now”, or at a certain milestone, the chances of getting an increase are slim.

    As others have noted, you state your case very well and are due the pay increase. While you say the company you work for is great, two red flags stand out:

    The first is the hourly pay rate for a supervisor.

    The second is, after 2 years employment, you should have had some kind of a work performance review, and some kind of a bone—even a small dollar an hour increase, should have been thrown at you.

    In any case you need to approach the powers that be and make your case for the pay increase, but dust off that resume and be prepared for a “no”, or a “ we need more time to assess your performance”.
     
  7. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I have to mirror what others have said. Listing your job duties and responsibilities I would say that this is a $70,000-100,000 a year job, depending on what your total sales, and volume are, but as others have said, you will be fighting an uphill battle to get that kind of jump in pay. Best you can do is lay it out on the table, just like you did here. Cite some sources about what others, in your same position get paid and hope for the best. But by doing that you do possibly put your job in jeopardy. After that conversation you bosses might start thinking that they can find someone willing to do the job for what you are getting paid now. Not saying it is going to happen but you have to be prepared if it backfires. Personally, I'd go for it. If they tell me know then I would probably start putting out feelers.
     
  8. fatcook

    fatcook

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    I don't think the OP is saying they are being paid by the hour. It sounds like there was a salary agreed to for a 45 hour work week, but the reality has turned into a 60 hour work week - which makes the salary equal less $ per hour.

    If the 60 hours is the minimum due to the work load, perhaps one way to present it is - there needs to be another hire or an increase for you to continue at those hours. The increase would probably be cheaper than a new person added to payroll and therefore look less insane / gigantic.
     
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  9. PastryAllDay

    PastryAllDay

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    Hey all-
    Thanks, it's correct, I'm paid salary but the hours expected jumped from 45 to a more realistic 60. I know as exec chef I should technically be able to "choose" if I want to work 20 or 200 hours... but that's not actually the case, I know I would lose my job /not do a good job if I worked 20 hours. There have been increased goals/projects/ added deadlines as I became more comfortable within the role, so that's why I am even considering asking for such a large raise. You all bring some very good points, and yes it's very scary to ask from 57 to 75. That's why I posted at all, bc it seems insane, but also it feels like that's what I deserve for the commitment they have from me. Hearing from this crew that 75 is not unreasonable is very helpful. Anyway, thanks for the help and I will report back with how it went!
     
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  10. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    This may be a good thread to mention this. For quite a while now i've been wanting to rewrite my resume in terms used by the manufacturing industry. So instead of menu development or creating recipes, I'd use an appropriate manufacturing term like "New Product Research and Development". Running the kitchen would become something like "Systems Analysis and Implementation". Hiring kitchen staff would be "Labor Relations and Management". Figuring out how to successfully produce a dish repeatedly would be "Product Implementation Engineering"
    I haven't researched actual terminology used but I hope you get the idea.
    It seems to me that pay in the manufacturing sector is higher for jobs like the one outlined in this thread despite much of the work being the same. For all that responsibility in a manufacturing position, 75k would be an initial offer, not the pie in the sky request it is in food service.
    So I'd like to rewrite the resume as I said, and then present it to an actual HR person for a manufacturing job and see what they would offer.
     
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  11. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    Just using different words in your résumé won't work. They will see through your dishonesty and lack of experience soon enough.

    I have worked in a factory before, and the way they do things are very different.

    For example, the way you come up with a new recipe in a restaurant, and the process of developing a new recipe/product in the plant is nothing alike.
     
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  12. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    I'm not going to actually apply for a job. I'd just like to know what the equivalent experience is and how much is paid for it in a different industry.
     
  13. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    Hi PastryAllDay,

    The revealing info for me is-

    "developing new wholesale product"

    "Acting as face of company and building community relationships. Weighing/research on business decisions about future program develop./next investment steps."

    This indicates you are part of the companies future, not merely a department manager. Now it is time for them to demonstrate that they want you for the future with more than words. I think this is decent timing, since it wasn't covered when hired.

    I would try to convince them why it is in their best interest to secure your services for the future, not why you think you deserve more money. Don't use "I". Explain the duties, responsibilities, and dedication required of the "person" holding your position, including the plans for the future, from a strategic business point of view. How important is THAT person to this business?

    You worked the first two years and have proven your capabilities. Now they should want to secure you as part of the team! You know their hot buttons, tie their hot buttons into how your position impacts what they care about most!

    Profit sharing should also be considered.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2018
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  14. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    Hi P.A.D.

    Any progress on your quest?
     
  15. PastryAllDay

    PastryAllDay

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    Hey all,

    Thanks for all the input! I went for it yesterday, super prepared, and told them how much I would like. They said yes after offering me some critiques of how I have been managing the kitchen. One of the most valuable was "stop putting out fires all the time, and start thinking instead of how we can create fire prevention." - ie for crisis management. Something that certainly made me think! Anyway, thanks all for your support, and it goes to show that sometimes the big ask can still happen! : )))
     
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  16. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    That's awesome!
     
  17. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Congratulations! I'm happy for you.
     
  18. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    Hi P.A.D.!

    Glad you went in prepared and found success! WooHoo!
     
  19. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Congratulations. I like their advice. Crisis prevention is good advice for everyone.