Sabatier - looking for a slicer

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by dhmcardoso, Jan 11, 2014.

  1. dhmcardoso

    dhmcardoso

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    Ok, so here is a questions that some old school chefs will love.

    I am looking for a Carbon Sabatier Slicer. I have a K-Sab chef's knife and several japanese. So, which is the best one option nowadays? Also, where to find it online. 

    I was thinking about Thiers Issard, just to try it, but I want to get the best option.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. benuser

    benuser

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    Not so sure whether a vintage French carbon will offer any advantage where performance is concerned. I would rather tend to a basic Japanese carbon sujihiki, by Fujiwara, Masahiro or Misono.
     
  3. benuser

    benuser

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  4. dhmcardoso

    dhmcardoso

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    It's not that I prefer or that this going to be The one. I have The knives I need for school. However, I do like my Sab and want to increase my options. My k sáb, for instancie, is over 50yrs old. I am always acquiring new tool, usually once a year. And in 2014 it's time for a Sab slicer! Hehehe
    I just wanna know what is The Best option out there.
     
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Okay, are you looking for a carving knife, a slicer, or a chefs knife????  The first one would also be known as a "clip point" knife and the second one has a tip that's rounded to approx 1" diameter and used for thinly slicing such things as ham and roast beef.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2014
  6. dhmcardoso

    dhmcardoso

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    In some webpages they also refer to 8" or longer "carving" slicers. But anyway, that's what I am looking for. a 9 or 10" carving.
     
  7. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Last edited: Jan 14, 2014
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Here

    And here.

    And here.

    And here.

    The seller, Ralph1396, has been an ebay seller for at least over a decade and you won't go wrong with doing business with him.  He sells quality but you'll pay for it...if it's what you really want.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2014
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    This is a great price for this one but it appears that the blade needs a little TLC.  As long as it's carbon steel this one would be the one to get.  Send an inquiry to see if its made of carbon steel.
     
  10. benuser

    benuser

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    I would avoid French stainless. I happen to know them very well, they are very common in Europe. In the best case comparable to soft German stainless, often much softer though. A soft carbon steel is no problem with sharpening, a soft stainless however is because of its large carbides. Proper deburring is almost impossible. To be avoided.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2014
  11. mike9

    mike9

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    Ralf1396 is a stand up guy.  In fact there are several go-to vendors who sell knives that I check out when the bug bites.
     
  12. dhmcardoso

    dhmcardoso

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    Kokopuffs and Benuser,

    That is the profile I am looking for, but carbon.

    34525V-TISabatier Slicing Knife 10"[img]http://www.thebestthings.com/knives/graphics/sabatier_slicer_10_tn.jpg[/img]$84.95

    However, I am much more concerned on getting a awesome sab. As I told, I have K-sabs and they are excellent but I wonder if there are other better options. Thiers-Issard is the only alternative good option that comes in my mind, but I am not shure it is better, equivalent or worst than the K-Sab.

    Best regards!
     
  13. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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  14. benuser

    benuser

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    Curiously, the chef's knife's tip is rather high for a French blade.
     
  15. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Indeed it is. I like the slicer (trancheur) but the design of the chef is not what I would appreciate. Perceval is a company based in Thiers, France.

    Another thing; if I would be after a nice Sabatier, I would buy a very standard one and let it rehandle by Dave Martell who owns the website "Kitchenknifeforums".Those Percevals are way too expensive.  Look how Dave Martell rehandles knives here; http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/150-Gallery-Western-Re-Handles
     
  16. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    Sent you a P.M.  on what you want. Yeah they are pretty cool knives.
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Checkout.   It needs a really good scrub with Bar Keeper's Friend.
     
  18. benuser

    benuser

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    Not sure there is no heavy pitting involved. A corroded bolster is rather the sign of gross neglect. The protruding fingerguard -- see the second picture -- will need some work.
    At that price point you better have a new one.
     
  19. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    Gotta agree with Benuser. They admit there is "light pitting" but having done lots of old rusty carbon steel, I'll bet it is much worse.

    That looks like a real rustbucket after the rust is removed with cleanser or other chemicals.

    Jim
     
  20. dhmcardoso

    dhmcardoso

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    I agree with you both Benuser and Jim, for the price, I gotta admit they could at least removed the rust. Not doing this is kinda suspicious.

    Daniel