rustproofing a spoon?

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by dougl, May 31, 2016.

  1. dougl

    dougl

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    I have a large and very handy spoon that is evidently made of non-stainless steel. Over time, it rusts. I was wondering if there is a commercial coating I could apply to seal the metal, that is durable enough to withstand hot water and ideally dishwasher soap. I know that a coat of mineral oil would do the job, but I'd just need to apply it regularly. Now, I understand that fishermen have coatings and corrosion inhibitors that they use for knives and hooks. I'm wondering if I want to get that stuff in my food.
     
  2. halb

    halb

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    Other than Brillo every time you wash it about the only thing I would suggest is to have it plated with something like silver or nickel. But that would probably cost more than the spoon is worth.
     
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    There is one option bakers use. Its a nonStick coating they use on buntrays and bread pans. Its pretty cheap, but the reglazers won't do just one piece. Time to buddy up with a local bakery the next time they get their bread and cake pans reglazed....

    Hope this helps
     
  4. dougl

    dougl

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    Well, it would be nice if there were a spray that would stick. I mean, I could even try regular enamel spray paint, but I dread the thought of it flaking off in my food, and who knows what chemicals leach out of it. But again, fisherfolk have spray-on hard glazes that allegedly resist even salt water for many years. Of course, they also spray on WD-40, which is probably the fishing equivalent of consumable mineral oil (yeah, it's used as an intestinal lubricant ...) but I'm not going to WD-40-ize my culinary creations.
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Rub the spoon with a rag soaked in flaxseed oil. Put upside in a 500 degree oven for 1 hour. Let cool for a couple of hours and repeat the process six more times.
     
  6. dougl

    dougl

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    Actually, I'm now aware that standard organic rustproofing for auto underbodies is linseed oil paint. (Linseed oil is, in fact, flaxseed.) I believe that this kind of paint is solvent-free. Gotta look into that. At first glance, the stuff ain't cheap, but I only need a few ccs of it.
     
  7. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    While this is true, make sure to use flaxseed oil because it is food grade. Linseed oil is extracted in part by using petroleum and is not food grade.
     
  8. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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         Linseed oil is used for the base of oil paints, both household and artist paints, typically the oil and a pigment.. Because of its long drying time, it is often treated with drying agents and other things to make it flow easier. There may also be mold inhibitors because being a natural product it can attract mold as it dries. There is raw linseed oil and boiled linseed oil, used for different purposes. Edible flaxseed is cold pressed, linseed oil is often pressed with solvents so not all are edible or interchangeable. Read the labels carefully. Flax and linseed come from the same plant but are not the same end product. 

         I learned much about this while researching paint manufacture when I bought my house. If you should decide to ask a  paint store about linseed oil, chances are they will argue for latex paints  and the clerk won't know much general knowledge of linseed or oil paints. After much research on my own, I found that politics played a huge role in the advancement of latex over oil paint. 

    Since this is a food website, I'll stop there. 

    So a flaxseed coating would seem to work but couldn't you just buy a new stainless spoon? 
     
  9. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Mash some plantain peels
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2016
  10. dougl

    dougl

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    That's very interesting. Thank you. In fact, there are similar cautions about using linseed oil for treating cutting boards. Raw linseed oil is evidently OK for straight human consumption, but "boiled linseed oil" which includes driers, has added chemicals. That being said, FDA publishes guidelines on what it considers safe for food contact surfaces, and "drying oils" derived from linseed *are* explicitly permitted. I have to assume that linseed paint is such. Now, this is probably a $20 spoon, and I don't want to spend $50 waterproofing it. But it has a shape that I very much like, and don't see elsewhere.
     
  11. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    That's what I wanna know......

    mimi
     
  12. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    This may be stretching things a bit ....but what a government recommends is not always prudent.

    Just ask the residents of Flint Michigan.

    mimi
     
  13. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Why not put the power of the forum to good use...

    Post some pix and measurements.

    We have a pretty good record of finding things.

    mimi
     
  14. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    http://www.walgreens.com/store/c/healthy-origins-ultra-omega-organic-flax-oil/ID=prod6314629-product

    Healthy Origins Ultra Omega Organic Flax Oil 16.0 oz. $8.99


    More than enough to accomplish the job with some left over to season cast iron or carbon steel pans. It is the bomb when it comes to seasoning pans. It is makes the hardest, longest lasting, most non-stick surface out there. (disclaimer: I am not affliiated with this product in any shape, form, or fashion, merely anal about flaxseed's prowess)
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2016
  15. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Flax, aka linseed, has been around a loooong long time.  Linseed oil was/is used in the paint industry, as well as varnishes, and when mixed with ground up cork and compressed, gives us linoleum flooring.

    The metallic driers used in blo (boiled linseed oil) tend to darken wood very quickly, so many furniture finishers tend to buy raw linseed oil, stick in in a crock pot, let it cook for a day, and use it. For furniture, it forms a film finish when can be reapplied very quickly and easily.  It's also cheap and pretty natural.

    One disclaimer when working with any kind of linseed/flaxseed oil product:  Be carefull of how you dispose of the rags.  If the rag is balled up in an enclosed space, it will self combust.  Many fires have been started this way.
     
  16. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    Is this, like a lucky spoon? Has sentimental value? Did it belong to your great-great-great grandmother? Does it have magical qualities like instantly makes food taste better? Does it have anti- gravity properties where it doesn't actually touch the food but moves it around with a force field?
    Me too. 
     
  17. dougl

    dougl

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    Yes, all of the above. Wouldn't you want to keep such a spoon from rusting? Oh, it also talks to me.
     
  18. dougl

    dougl

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    Well, that sure stopped the conversation!
     
  19. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Didn't want to interrupt any conversation that might be going on. :~)
     
    flipflopgirl likes this.
  20. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I've used flaxseed on pans, never on a spoon.    Seems to me a spoon gets used more, washed more and the oil wouldn't stay on so long.   I still like my approach forcing a patina with plantains or a commercial rust converter.  course your spoon will be black and blue but at least it won't rust!