Rouxbe online courses

Discussion in 'Choosing A Culinary School' started by ivanthetrble, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    HI all,

    I am wondering if anyone has any experience with the Rouxbe online courses. I am a home cook with a full time career away from food but I would like to continue learning and their professional cook program seems to be pretty well organized into a 6 month program. It does seem a bit odd to consider online classes but for me going to a formal culinary program just isn't going to be in the cards. I feel that I have progressed well beyond the normal Sur la Table type classes and am looking for something with more structure and challenge. Any thoughts on this program would be appreciated. Thanks!

    ITT
     
  2. TheSaladGuy

    TheSaladGuy

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    It's honestly not worth it. If you're going to go to culinary school, go to culinary school. Otherwise YouTube certain things, a great book id and a lot of people would recommend is "The Professional Chef" study that on your own time. Also The Flavor Bible is well.. my bible when it comes to experimenting lol. But online just isn't worth it school wise
     
  3. TheSaladGuy

    TheSaladGuy

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    And I know YouTube sounds ratchet but, there's a lot of chefs on there that routinely post quickie tutorial
     
  4. flambae

    flambae

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    I agree with SaladGuy, unless you have money to blow and want to waste a little time. You should only be paying for courses in cooking if you have a physical instructor right in front of you and access to all the equipment and ingredients you will need. The two books he recommended are pretty great tools too. There is a wealth of information on the internet about everything, youtube and blogs like this are probably a better(and cheaper) way to keep learning and growing as a cook. If you really want the classes, chances are that your local community college offers some type of cooking classes in the late afternoon or evening that might fit your schedule.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Skip the Professional Chef. Its intended to supplement and be a reference for in class time. There's a lot it never explains on its own.

    Rouxbe has been spoken well of by other members here before. I have no experience with it.

    Still, alot can be learned and practiced for free or less than rouxbe

    Craftsy has a free knife course that's decent. Search this site. We've discussed the class and have a link to it. Supplement that with Chad Ward's An Edge in the Kitchen. This is readily available used. I read it from my local library.

    Knife skills are the most basic skills and equipment for cooking. That's where you should start.

    My favorite book for learning to cook at home is Essentials of Cooking by James Peterson. He walks you through everything step by step with good photos.
    It was out of print for a while but lots of used copies are around. It is available as an ebook as well. I first read this from my library before getting my own copy. Go through it. Cook for 6 months, then go through it a second time. You'll be a very different cook by then and will have a very different experience and insight into the material.

    My next choice is The Chef's Art by Wayne Gisslen. Again readily available used for cheap. Gisslen has written many books for teaching professional chefs. This one he wrote for home cooks. He gets into some more advanced material but I learned a lot from it. I want to add this to my shelf but haven't bought a copy yet.

    America's Test Kitchen Cooking School is also a good introduction but not as deep as the others I've mentioned.

    Jacques Pepin's New Complete Techniques is a lot of photographs of and discussion of techniques. It's worth looking at after you've done time with some introductory material. It will be a deluge of information. Don't try to comprehend it all. Just use it to clarify a few questions and know that such a resource exists for when you need it.

    As you're cooking try to explain to yourself why you're doing things this particular way. Why that pan at that heat. Why this particular shape and size for cutting things.

    And taste, following food safe practices of course. Learn how foods and seasonings taste and change and develop during cooking.
     
    drirene and ivanthetrble like this.
  6. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    I have taken some good classes at the local LCB before they closed. I live in Portland, Oregon and I have been hoping the Oregon Culinary Institute would have some offerings for folks like me but so far no luck. I have been a regular on YouTube and there are some good videos but it all feels a bit piecemeal. Was hoping to find something with a bit more structure.
     
  7. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    Some things I have not heard of, thanks! The Jacques Pepin reference sounds interesting.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
  8. TheSaladGuy

    TheSaladGuy

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    I disagree wholeheartedly with the "Skip The Professional Chef" It's a book that helped me out tremendously, even though I still have a lot to learn, that's helped me with the bulk of it. From identifying fish, meats, veggies, etc. To learning proper temps and terms, food cost, business aspect of it all, etc. And for the stuff you find difficult to understand, there's always google !
     
  9. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    Not sure some of this would actually pertain to my situation. I am a home cook with no desire to enter the food industry, but I would like to have the knowledge and skills to cook like I could. The business aspects of it all really don't apply to my situation. If I had the time I would love to go to culinary school, again not to enter the industry but to have the skill set. Trying to find the best way to acquire this skill set is the issue. I do find YouTube etc to be helpful but would like something a bit more structured and that is why I was curious about Rouxbe.
     
    dectra likes this.
  10. TheSaladGuy

    TheSaladGuy

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    It's filled with most known cooking methods (French and American), equipment, how to use it, etc. but yeah it is mainly for... as the title says; Professional Chefs haha
     
  11. zberlin

    zberlin

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    I too am a home cook and I've taken many courses from craftsy, professional schools in NYC and courses at Rouxbe. Rouxbe really spot on and the costs are relatively cheap. I would stay away from youtube in its entirety. Lots of useless and quite frankly wrong info. Good luck